This balanced and thoughtful book presents a thorough analysis of the dynamics of China’s foreign political and economic relations. Sebastian Heilmann and Dirk H. Schmidt consider China’s view of the world; its foreign policy decision-making process; its major bilateral relations; and key policy issues such as trade and investment, security, human rights, and climate change. The authors also assess how China’s often unconventional and hidden activities underlying its global expansion challenge Western predominance. By explicitly addressing controversies and conflicts and providing rich information and balanced arguments, Heilmann and Schmidt demonstrate that the institutions, procedures, and policies that are shaping Chinese foreign relations are far more complex and fluid than standard IR theory or media reporting suggest.
Written by an international team of experts from the US, UK, Hong Kong, China, Korea and Canada, this important and interesting book examines and exploresthe relationship between the international political and economic system, and Chinae(tm)s economic and political transition. Exploring international relations theory with a China-centric view, thebook addresses key and significant questions such as: Has the outside world shaped Chinae(tm)s position within the global polity and economic, and affected the way China deals with the world economy? Have Chinese leaders and foreign policy makers internalized the norms and values of the global economic activity? Who are the key players in China in this process of globalization? Giving vital insights into Chinae(tm)s likely development and international influence in the next decade, Chinae(tm)s Reforms and International Political Economy is an essential and invaluable read.
China’s inexorable rise as a major world power is one of the defining features of the contemporary political landscape. But should we heed the warnings of a so-called ‘China threat?’ Is China set to become the next superpower? Or will its ambitions be tempered by economic and political realities both at home and abroad? In this insightful and balanced analysis, noted China expert Stuart Harris explores China’s present foreign policy and its motivations, focusing in particular on the extent to which China will co-operate with the West in years to come. He considers what factors, international or domestic, will influence the foreign policies being shaped in Beijing, including how far the Chinese regime will adhere to existing global norms and the evolving international system. In contemplating this uncertain future, Harris assesses the considerable challenges and vulnerabilities likely to impact on Chinese foreign policy, leading it to be cautious and hesitant or assertive and aggressive on the international stage. Concise and authoritative, this book will be essential reading for anyone seeking a clearer understanding of the international relations of one of the world’s most important powers.
In this timely text, Denny Roy shows how the drive for security and power underlying Chinese foreign policy is reinforced by other important factors, including China's internal political struggles and unique, historically driven perceptions of international affairs. Providing a wide-ranging assessment of China's foreign policy, the author explores the PRC's relationships with key international organizations and countries, including the United States, Japan, Russia, Korea, India, and the Southeast Asian states.
The book presents the views of leading Chinese and American scholars working in the fields of Chinese foreign policy, national security and international political economy. It seeks to challenge the conventional wisdom about China's recent rise, contending it is a much more complex and contested trend than it has often been portrayed to be.
Ten outstanding specialists in Chinese foreign policy draw on new theories, methods, and sources to examine China's use of force, its response to globalization, and the role of domestic politics in its foreign policy.
"This comprehensive introduction to Chinese foreign relations examines the opportunities and limits China faces as it seeks growing international influence. Tracing the record of twists and turns in Chinese foreign relations since the end of the Cold War, Robert G. Sutter provides a nuanced analysis that shows that along with popular perceptions of its growing power, Beijing is hampered by both domestic and international constraints. Newly revised, this edition features more extensive treatment of China's role in the international economy and greater discussion of its relations with the developing world. Overall, the text's balanced and thorough assessment shows China's leaders exerting more influence in world affairs but remaining far from dominant. Facing numerous contradictions and tradeoffs, they move cautiously as they deal with a complex global environment."--Publisher's description.
Since the mid-1990s, the Chinese authorities have gradually come to embrace multilateralism to realize their basic foreign policy objectives in maintaining a peaceful international environment and enhancing China's international status and influence. This embrace is largely based on pragmatic considerations. There is no denial, however, that elements of liberalism and constructivism gradually enter into the considerations of Chinese leaders. They accept, for example, that non-traditional security issues can only be tackled through genuine multilateralism. This volume carefully examines China's increased participation in multilateral organizations and mechanisms and its efforts to initiate and develop its own discourses on global affairs straddling Asia, the Middle East, Africa and the Latin American continents. China's presence in international multilateral organizations has been providing developing countries a better chance to maintain a balance of power. Since China has no ambitious plan to transform the existing international order, its increasing enthusiastic engagement of multilateralism is likely to be accepted by the international community. Contents: PrefaceAbout the AuthorList of TablesAcronyms and AbbreviationsMultilateralism — Theoretical Issues and China's Approach in Foreign PolicyChina in Asia: China's Asian Policy in the Early Twenty-First Century: Adjusting to its Increasing StrengthChina's Regional Strategy and Challenges in East AsiaChina's ASEAN Policy in the 1990s: Pushing for Regional Multi-polarityThe Path of Least Resistance: China's Way of Engagement in Southeast AsiaThe ASEAN-China Free Trade Area — Success or Failure? A Preliminary Evaluation Based on Econometric EvidenceChina-ASEAN Economic Co-Operation and the Role of ProvincesChina and the World: The Shanghai Co-Operation Organisation: China's Initiative in Regional Institutional BuildingChina's Approach to Shanghai Co-operation Organisation: Institutional Building, Economic Co-operation and the Challenge from AfghanistanChina's Relations with the Gulf Co-operation Council States: Multi-level Diplomacy in a Divided Arab WorldChina's Approach to BRICSLatin America in China's Contemporary Foreign PolicyChina's African Policy in the Post-Cold War EraBibliographyIndex Readership: Policymakers, academics, professionals, undergraduate and graduate students interested in China's foreign policy. Keywords: Multilateralism;China;Foreign Policy;International RelationsReview: Key Features: It is a valuable reference book for undergraduate students, postgraduate students and scholars in the fields of China's foreign policy and international relations in the Asia-PacificIt is a most up-to-date account of China's approaches to its most significant multilateral regional organizations and forumsIn view of China's importance in international politics and economy, it is important to understand its policy
Modern China's Foreign Policy was first published in 1953. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. What are China's objectives in world affairs and what course will she pursue to achieve her goals? These are the questions of vital concern to the Western democracies, questions that can be approached intelligently only from a knowledge of how China's foreign policy has developed. In this illuminating and carefully documented book, Professor Levi analyzes china's attitudes and actions toward the rest of the world and clarifies many motivations behind her behavior, past and present. He traces the development of her foreign relations from the beginning of the modern era of Chinese contacts with Westerners, a little more than hundred years ago. The emphasis, however, is on the twentieth century, and particularly on the years since the peace settlements of World War I. The complex balance of relationships between China and the United States, on the one hand, and China and the Soviet Union, on the other, since the end of World War II is discussed in detail. Communist doctrine, notwithstanding its apparent rigidity, is shown to be a conveniently adjustable tool, capable of adaptation to the needs and strategies of present-day China. An integral part of the account is the attempt to single out and interpret the internal forces -- cultural, social, and economic -- that have influenced and shaped China's external policies. Thus, it is shown that the determinants of China's foreign policy have often been pressures and complexities within the country and that and understanding of the Chinese people and their traditions is essential to nations in their dealings with China.
This book offers an accessible, informative and up-to-date systemic analysis of the foreign policy of China. It demonstrates how domestic factors have profoundly shaped China’s foreign policy, from the late Mao’s era to the reform era, presenting its argument through an in-depth analysis of major cases of Chinese foreign policy.
This volume examines the Chinese foreign policy framework today and traces its evolution since the post-Mao era. Through the consideration of China's relations with the major powers and its management of various challenges ranging from territorial disputes to energy security, it investigates China's pursuit of major power status and influence in peaceful international scenarios. The author critically analyzes China's foreign policy from Chinese leaders' evolving worldview of the changing international environment. As China emerges as a major power and the second largest economy in the world, anyone interested in international politics and scenarios as well as China's foreign policy needs a basic, insightful reference book like this. Contents:China's Foreign Policy: Coping with the Challenge of PowerOverall Framework:The Evolution of China's Foreign Policy in the Post-Mao Era: From Anti-Hegemony to Modernization DiplomacyChina's Foreign Policy in the Mid–1990sChina's Foreign Policy Since the Seventeenth Party CongressConvincing the World of China's Tradition to Pursue Universal HarmonyChina's Significant Bilateral Relations:China's Peaceful Rise and the .U.S — Mutual Perceptions, Mutual Trust and Planning for Future ScenariosChinese Perceptions of Russian Foreign Policy During the Two Putin Administration: U.S.–Russia Relations and "Strategic Triangle" ConsiderationsChina's Japan Policy: Seeking Stability and Improvement in Uncertainties and ConflictsChina's India Policy: Balancing Global and Bilateral IssuesSino–Vietnamese Relations in the Early Twenty-first Century: Economics in Command?China's Iran Policy: Balancing Interests and Managing ExpectationsChina's Management of Various Challenges:A Chinese View of China's Energy SecurityBattle Ready? Developing a Blue-water Navy: China's Strategic DilemmaChina's Ocean Development Strategy and Its Handling of the Territorial Conflicts in the South China SeaFrom Non-interference to a Responsible Major Power: China's Engagement in DarfurChina's Approach to Intervention in the Syrian Crisis: The Challenge of Working through the United Nations System Readership: Academics, undergraduate and graduates students, professionals and policy makers interested in China's Foreign Policy. Key Features:The most updated and comprehensive book on Chinese foreign policyAnalyzes the Chinese perspective critically and objectivelyStudies China's relations with key countries and its various significant global challenges
This book examines China’s relations with its weak peripheral states through the theoretical lens of structural power and structural violence. China’s foreign policy concepts toward its weak neighbouring states, such as the ‘One Belt, One Road’ strategy, are premised on the assumption that economic exchange and a commitment to common development are the most effective means of ensuring stability on its borders. This book, however, argues that China’s overreliance on economic exchange as the basis for its bilateral relations contains inherently self-defeating qualities that have contributed and can further contribute to instability and insecurity within China’s periphery. Unequal economic exchange between China and its weak neighbours results in Chinese influence over the state’s domestic institutions, what this book refers to as ‘structural power’. Chinese structural power, in turn, can undermine the state’s development, contribute to social unrest, and exacerbate existing state/society tensions—what this book refers to as ‘structural violence’. For China, such outcomes lead to instability within its peripheral environment and raise its vulnerability to security threats stemming from nationalism, separatism, terrorism, transnational organised crime, and drug trafficking, among others. This book explores the causality between China’s economically-reliant foreign policy and insecurity in its weak peripheral states and considers the implications for China’s security environment and foreign policy. This book will be of much interest to students of Chinese politics, Asian security studies, international political economy and IR in general.
This updated and expanded new edition of Chinese Foreign Policy examines the patterns of engagement with various domestic and international actors that have shaped Beijing's foreign policy since the Cold War. It explores a series of ongoing questions and trends, as well as offering an in-depth look at the key areas of China's modern global relations. Bringing together the many different facets of China's foreign interests, the volume presents a comprehensive overview of the country's international affairs, covering such key issues as: -the rise of globalisation, international financial uncertainty, and China's economic power -the country's bilateral and multilateral approaches to international problem-solving -China's engagement in various regional and international regimes -modern strategic challenges, including terrorism and economic security -the question of shifting American power -Beijing's changing political, strategic and economic linkages with the developed and developing world. Chinese Foreign Policy will be of great interest to upper-level students of Chinese international relations, Asian politics, comparative foreign policy and international relations, as well as professionals interested in China's changing place in the global system.
Chinese Foreign Policy offers an unprecedented survey of China's foreign relations since 1949. The contributors include leading historians, economists, and political scientists in the field of Chinese studies, as well as noteworthy international relations specialists. The principal purposes of the volume are to assess the variety of sources that give shape to Chinese foreign policy, and to trace four decades of Chinese interaction with the world. Individual chapters include consideration of the historical, perceptual, economic, and political sources of Chinese foreign policy; how the international strategic and technological systems impact on China and vice versa; China's evolving relations with the United States, the former Soviet Union, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia since the Chinese Communist Party came to power; patterns in China's co-operative and conflictual behaviour; how China negotiates; China's role in the international economy; and the relationship between international relations theory and the study of Chinese foreign policy. Studies of these subjects are retrospective, but they consider various scenarios for the future evolution of China's relations with the world community. Contributors: Wendy Frieman, Steven M. Goldstein, Carol Lee Hamrin, Harry Harding, Lillian Craig Harris, Harold C. Hinton, Samuel S. Kim, Wiliam C. Kirby, Paul H. Kreisberg, Steven I. Levine, Barry Naughton, James N. Rosenau, Madelyn C. Ross, Philip Snow, WilliamT. Tow, Wang Jisi, Allen S. Whiting, Michael B. Yahuda, and the editors.
Most people believe China's foreign behavior is driven by its growing power status in world politics. Chinese leaders still firmly uphold some traditional values in foreign policy such as sovereignty, territorial integrity, and national unification. However, it is often neglected that China's behavior is also shaped by its changing perception of the globalizing world and, to a large extent, is a result of external pressure on China. By examining the dynamics of paradigm shifts in China's foreign policy thinking, this book explores the ideological sources of China's international relations in the new century. With growing economic interdependence with the outside world, which creates both constraints as well as incentives to adapt to the prevailing norms in contemporary international relations, authors of this volume analyze indigenous Chinese sources of intellect on the paradigm shifts. The concepts studied in this volume include national identity, nationalism, globalism, multilateralism, sovereignty, and the role of international law in Chinese foreign policy. This volume helps to shed new light on how the dynamics of paradigm shifts affect China's behavior in international affairs.
China’s rise as a major trading power has prompted debate about the nature of that country’s involvement in the liberal international economic order. China’s Foreign Trade Policy sheds light on this complex question by examining the changing domestic forces shaping China’s foreign trade relations. Specifically, this book explores the evolving trade policymaking process in China by looking at: China’s WTO accession negotiation China’s bilateral trade disputes The development of China’s antidumping regime China’s emerging trade disputes in the WTO. In addition, Ka Zeng examines how lobbying patterns in China are becoming more open and pluralistic, with bureaucratic agencies, sectoral interests, regional interests, and even transnational actors increasingly able to influence the process and outcome of China’s trade negotiations. Using case studies of China’s trade disputes with its major trading partners, as well as China’s participation in the dispute settlement process of the World Trade Organization, to present an in-depth analysis of China’s trade relations, this book will appeal to students and scholars of international political economy, Chinese politics and foreign policy, and more generally Asian studies.
This book examines the political factors in the economic relationship between the European Union and China that help to explain the apparent stalling of the EU-China strategic partnership in policy terms. Written by two specialists with long experience of EU-China relations, this new volume draws on the latest research on how each side has emerged from the economic crisis and argues that promising potential for EU-China cooperation is being repeatedly undermined by political obstacles on both sides. The work is designed to be an analysis useful for university faculty and students interested in China and the European Union as well as for the general reader, providing an empirically-led examination that is academically informed and yet also approachable. Dissecting key policy areas such as trade, research and innovation, investment, and monetary affairs, the conclusion offers a compelling prognosis of how the EU-China relationship might develop over the coming years.
China and South Korea have come a long way since they were adversaries. The arc of their relationship since the late 1970s is an excellent model of East-West cooperation and, at the same time, highlights the growing impact of China's "rise" over its regional neighbors, including America's close allies. South Korea-China relations have rarely been studied as an independent theme. The accumulation of more than fifteen years of research, Between Ally and Partner reconstructs a comprehensive portrait of Sino-Korean rapprochement and examines the strategic dilemma that the rise of China has posed for South Korea and its alliance with the United States. Jae Ho Chung makes use of declassified government archives, internal reports, and opinion surveys and conducts personal interviews with Korean, Chinese, and American officials. He tackles three questions: Why did South Korea and China reconcile before the end of the cold war? How did rapprochement lay the groundwork for diplomatic normalization? And what will the intersection of security concerns and economic necessity with China mean for South Korea's relationship with its close ally, the United States? The implications of Sino-Korean relations go far beyond the Korean Peninsula. South Korea was caught largely unprepared, both strategically and psychologically, by China's rise, and the dilemma that South Korea now faces has crucial ramifications for many countries in Asia, where attempts to counterbalance China have been rare. Thoroughly investigated and clearly presented, this book answers critical questions concerning what kept these two countries talking and how enmity was transformed into a zeal for partnership.
By mid-2015, the Obama presidency will be entering its final stages, and the race among the successors in both parties will be well underway. And while experts have already formed a provisional understanding of the Obama administration's foreign policy goals, the shape of the "Obama Doctrine" is finally coming into full view. It has been consistently cautious since Obama was inaugurated in 2009, but recent events in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and the Far East have led an increasingly large number of foreign policy experts to conclude that caution has transformed into weakness. In The Obama Doctrine, Colin Dueck analyzes and explains what the Obama Doctrine in foreign policy actually is, and maps out the competing visions on offer from the Republican Party. Dueck, a leading scholar of US foreign policy, contends it is now becoming clear that Obama's policy of international retrenchment is in large part a function of his emphasis on achieving domestic policy goals. There have been some successes in the approach, but there have also been costs. For instance, much of the world no longer trusts the US to exert its will in international politics, and America's adversaries overseas have asserted themselves with increasing frequency. The Republican Party will target these perceived weaknesses in the 2016 presidential campaign and develop competing counter-doctrines in the process. Dueck explains that within the Republican Party, there are two basic impulses vying with each other: neo-isolationism and forceful internationalism. Dueck subdivides each impulse into the specific agenda of the various factions within the party: Tea Party nationalism, neoconservatism, conservative internationalism, and neo-isolationism. He favors a realistic but forceful US internationalism, and sees the willingness to disengage from the world by some elements of the party as dangerous. After dissecting the various strands, he articulates an agenda of forward-leaning American realism--that is, a policy in which the US engages with the world and is willing to use threats of force for realist ends. The Obama Doctrine not only provides a sharp appraisal of foreign policy in the Obama era; it lays out an alternative approach to marshaling American power that will help shape the foreign policy debate in the run-up to the 2016 elections.

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