The papers in this volume show the origin and development of Bernstein's theoretical studies into the relationships between social class, patterns of language use and the primary socialization of the child. 'Bernstein's hypothesis will require [teachers] to look afresh not only at their pupils' language but at how they teach and how their pupils learn.' Douglas Barnes, Times Educational Supplement 'His honesty is such that it illuminates several aspects of what it is to be a genius.' Josephine Klein, British Journal of Educational Studies
The papers in this volume show the origin and development of Bernstein's theoretical studies into the relationships between social class, patterns of language use and the primary socialization of the child. 'Bernstein's hypothesis will require [teachers] to look afresh not only at their pupils' language but at how they teach and how their pupils learn.' Douglas Barnes, Times Educational Supplement 'His honesty is such that it illuminates several aspects of what it is to be a genius.' Josephine Klein, British Journal of Educational Studies
The papers in this second volume show some of the results of the empirical exploration of Bernstein's hypothesis. The volume represents a significant contribution not only to the study of the sociology of language, but also to education and the social sciences. "This collection demonstrates the magnitude of Bernstein's pioneering contribution to socio-linguistic studies" - S. John Eggleston, Times Educational Supplement
Illustrating the effect of class relationships upon the institutionalizing of elaborate codes in the school, the papers in this volume each develop from the previous one and demonstrate the evolution of the concepts discussed.
This book represents part of an ongoing effort to understand the rules, practices, agencies and agents which shape and change the social construction of pedagogic discourse. It draws together and re-examines the findings of the author's earlier work.
This book, the fifth in the series developing Bernstein's code theory, presents a lucid account of the most recent developments of this code theory and, importantly, shows the close relation between this development and the empirical research to which the theory has given rise. Pedagogy, Symbolic Control and Identity addresses the central issue of Bernstein's research project: are there any general principles underlying the transformation of knowledge into pedagogic communication? In Bernstein's view, we have studied only pedagogic messages and their institutional and ideological base. We have not studied the nature of the relay which makes messages possible. The discussion of this research forms part II of this book, where Bernstein makes explicit the methodology of the research and, in particular, the crucial significance of languages of description. This new edition of Bernstein's classic book is updated with three new chapters: on discourse, on official knowledge and identities, and a wide ranging interview with Joseph Solomon. The new edition, published as Volume Five in his Class, Codes, and Control Series, builds on the continuing tradition of Bernstein's highly influential work on class, education, language, and society.
Illustrating the effect of class relationships upon the institutionalizing of elaborate codes in the school, the papers in this volume each develop from the previous one and demonstrate the evolution of the concepts discussed.
Drugs in Society: Causes, Concepts, and Control, Eighth Edition, focuses on the many critical areas of America's drug problem, providing a foundation for rational decision-making within this complex and multidisciplinary field. Lyman offers a comprehensive big-picture examination of the US drug problem, dealing with drugs, abusers, drug enforcement, and public policy. Organized in three sections: Understanding the Problem, Gangs and Drugs, and Fighting Back, topics covered include the business of drugs and the role of organized crime in the drug trade, drug legalization and decriminalization, legal and law enforcement strategies, an analysis of the socialization process of drug use and abuse, and a historical discussion of drug abuse that puts the contemporary drug problem into perspective. Suitable for upper-level undergraduates in Criminal Justice, Criminology, and related programs, Drugs in Society, Eighth Edition, uses logical organization and strong pedagogy (case studies, focused text boxes with related information, critical thinking tasks) to support learning objectives.
The second edition of this book would not have been possible without the comments and suggestions from students, especially those at Columbia University. Many of the new topics introduced here are a direct result of student feedback that helped refine and clarify the material. The intention of this book was to develop material that the author would have liked to have had available as a student. Theory of Applied Robotics: Kinematics, Dynamics, and Control (2nd Edition) explains robotics concepts in detail, concentrating on their practical use. Related theorems and formal proofs are provided, as are real-life applications. The second edition includes updated and expanded exercise sets and problems. New coverage includes: components and mechanisms of a robotic system with actuators, sensors and controllers, along with updated and expanded material on kinematics. New coverage is also provided in sensing and control including position sensors, speed sensors and acceleration sensors. Students, researchers, and practicing engineers alike will appreciate this user-friendly presentation of a wealth of robotics topics, most notably orientation, velocity, and forward kinematics.
This unified survey focuses on linear discrete-time systems and explores natural extensions to nonlinear systems. It emphasizes discrete-time systems, summarizing theoretical and practical aspects of a large class of adaptive algorithms. 1984 edition.
The perennially bestselling third edition of Norman A. Anderson's Instrumentation for Process Measurement and Control provides an outstanding and practical reference for both students and practitioners. It introduces the fields of process measurement and feedback control and bridges the gap between basic technology and more sophisticated systems. Keeping mathematics to a minimum, the material meets the needs of the instrumentation engineer or technician who must learn how equipment operates. I t covers pneumatic and electronic control systems, actuators and valves, control loop adjustment, combination control systems, and process computers and simulation
Unsparing and important. . . . An informative, clearheaded and sobering book.—Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post (1999 Critic's Choice) Inner-city black America is often stereotyped as a place of random violence, but in fact, violence in the inner city is regulated through an informal but well-known code of the street. This unwritten set of rules—based largely on an individual's ability to command respect—is a powerful and pervasive form of etiquette, governing the way in which people learn to negotiate public spaces. Elijah Anderson's incisive book delineates the code and examines it as a response to the lack of jobs that pay a living wage, to the stigma of race, to rampant drug use, to alienation and lack of hope.
This book represents part of an ongoing effort to understand the rules, practices, agencies and agents which shape and change the social construction of pedagogic discourse. It draws together and re-examines the findings of the author's earlier work.

Best Books