Intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students, this text is based on the highly successful course given by Walter Greiner at the University of Frankfurt, Germany. The two volumes on classical mechanics provide not only a complete survey of the topic but also an enormous number of worked examples and problems to show students clearly how to apply the abstract principles to realistic problems.
The series of texts on Classical Theoretical Physics is based on the highly successful courses given by Walter Greiner. The volumes provide a complete survey of classical theoretical physics and an enormous number of worked out examples and problems.
This reference and workbook provides not only a complete survey of classical electrodynamics, but also an enormous number of worked examples and problems to show the reader how to apply abstract principles to realistic problems. The book will prove useful to graduate students in electrodynamics needing a practical and comprehensive treatment of the subject.
This text provides a pedagogical tour through mechanics from Newton to Einstein with detailed explanations and a large number of worked examples. From the very beginning relativity is kept in mind, along with its relation to concepts of basic mechanics, such as inertia, escape velocity, Newton's potential, Kepler motion and curvature. The Lagrange and Hamilton formalisms are treated in detail, and extensive applications to central forces and rigid bodies are presented. After consideration of the motivation of relativity, the essential tensor calculus is developed, and thereafter Einstein's equation is solved for special cases with explicit presentation of calculational steps. The combined treatment of classical mechanics and relativity thus enables the reader to see the connection between Newton's gravitational potential, Kepler motion and Einstein's corrections, as well as diverse aspects of mechanics. The text addresses students and others pursuing a course in classical mechanics, as well as those interested in a detailed course on relativity.
Comprehensive graduate-level text by a distinguished theoretical physicist reveals the classical underpinnings of modern quantum field theory. Topics include space-time, Lorentz transformations, conservation laws, equations of motion, Green’s functions, and more. 1964 edition.
in this work, we must therefore assume several abstract concepts that hardly need defending at this point in the history of mechanics. Most notably, these include the concept of the point particle and the concept of the inertial observer. The study of the relativistic particle system is undertaken here by means of a particular classical theory, which also exists on the quantum level, and which is especially suited to the many-body system in flat spacetime. In its fundamental postulates, the theory may be consid ered to be primarily the work of E.C.G. Stiickelberg in the 1940's, and of L.P. Horwitz and C. Piron in the 1970's, who may be said to have provided the generalization of Stiickelberg's theory to the many-body system. The references for these works may be found in Chapter 1. The theory itself may be legitimately called off-shell Hamiltonian dynamics, parameterized relativistic mechanics, or even classical event dynamics. The most important feature of the theory is probably the use of an invariant world time parameter, usually denoted T, which provides an evolution time for the system in such as way as to allow manifest co variance within a Hamiltonian formalism. In general, this parameter is neither a Lorentz-frame time, nor the proper time of the particles in the system.
Originally written in 1964, this famous text is a study of the classical theory of charged particles. Many applications treat electrons as point particles. At the same time, there is a widespread belief that the theory of point particles is beset with various difficulties such as an infinite electrostatic self-energy, a rather doubtful equation of motion which admits physically meaningless solutions, violation of causality and others. The classical theory of charged particles has been largely ignored and has been left in an incomplete state since the discovery of quantum mechanics. Despite the great efforts of men such as Lorentz, Abraham, Poincar‚, and Dirac, it is usually regarded as a ?lost cause?. But thanks to progress made just a few years ago, the author is able to resolve the various problems and to complete this unfinished theory successfully.
The Compendium of Theoretical Physics contains the canonical curriculum of theoretical physics. From classical mechanics over electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and statistical physics/thermodynamics, all topics are treated axiomatic-deductively and confimed by exercises, solutions and short summaries.
One could make the claim that all branches of physics are basically generalizations of classical mechanics. It is also often the first course which is taught to physics students. The approach of this book is to construct an intermediate discipline between general courses of physics and analytical mechanics, using more sophisticated mathematical tools. The aim of this book is to prepare a self-consistent and compact text that is very useful for teachers as well as for independent study.
Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems presents a modern and reasonably complete account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies for physics students at the advanced undergraduate level. The book aims to present a modern treatment of classical mechanical systems in such a way that the transition to the quantum theory of physics can be made with the least possible difficulty; to acquaint the student with new mathematical techniques and provide sufficient practice in solving problems; and to impart to the student some degree of sophistication in handling both the formalism of the theory and the operational technique of problem solving. Vector methods are developed in the first two chapters and are used throughout the book. Other chapters cover the fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics, the special theory of relativity, gravitational attraction and potentials, oscillatory motion, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, central-force motion, two-particle collisions, and the wave equation.
The fourth edition contains seven new sections with chapters on General Relativity, Gravitational Waves and Relativistic Cosmology. The text has been thoroughly revised and additional problems inserted. The Complete course of Theoretical Physics by Landau and Lifshitz, recognized as two of the world's outstanding physicists, is published in full by Butterworth-Heinemann. It comprises nine volumes, covering all branches of the subject; translations from the Russian are by leading scientists.
The new edition of a classic text that concentrates on developing general methods for studying the behavior of classical systems, with extensive use of computation.
First Published in 2018. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.
This book constructs the mathematical apparatus of classical mechanics from the beginning, examining basic problems in dynamics like the theory of oscillations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The author emphasizes geometrical considerations and includes phase spaces and flows, vector fields, and Lie groups. Discussion includes qualitative methods of the theory of dynamical systems and of asymptotic methods like averaging and adiabatic invariance.
A Wall Street Journal Best Book of 2013 If you ever regretted not taking physics in college--or simply want to know how to think like a physicist--this is the book for you. In this bestselling introduction, physicist Leonard Susskind and hacker-scientist George Hrabovsky offer a first course in physics and associated math for the ardent amateur. Challenging, lucid, and concise, The Theoretical Minimum provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.
Why study relativistic particle physics? Because of deeper understanding, curiosity and applications. Consider first deeper understanding. Physics forms the basis of many other sciences, and relativistic particle physics forms the basis of physics. Starting from nonrelativistic point mechanics, there are three major steps: first to classical (unquantized) relativistic electrodynamics, then to non relativistic quantum mechanics and finally to relativistic quantum physics. This book describes the third step. Relativistic particle problems which are mainly classical (such as synchrotron radiation) are largely omitted (see for example Jackson 1975). I have divided the subject into several smaller steps. The step from the Schrödinger equation to the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations (chapter 1) is easy, apart from logical inconsistencies in limiting cases. Chapter 2 deals mainly with two-particle problems. From two-particle unitarity (sect. 2-5) and a symmetric treatment of projectile and target in the Born approxima tion to scattering (sect. 2-7), one is able to deduce recoil corrections to the relativistic one-particle equations (mainly the reduced mass, sect. 2-9). The final formulas provide a rather firm basis for atomic physics. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is presented in chapter 3. Clearly, many things must be omitted if one allots one chapter to the subject of whole 1976, Källen 1958, Akhiezer and Berestetskii books (Jauch and Rohrlieh 1965, Bjorken and Drell 1965, Landau and Lifshitz 1971, 1975, and others).
This classic text enables students to make connections between classical and modern physics - an indispensable part of a physicist's education. In this new edition, Beams Medal winner Charles Poole and John Safko have updated the text to include the latest topics, applications, and notation, to reflect today's physics curriculum. They introduce students to the increasingly important role that nonlinearities play in contemporary applications of classical mechanics. New numerical exercises help students to develop skills in how to use computer techniques to solve problems in physics. Mathematical techniques are presented in detail so that the text remains fully accessible to students who have not had an intermediate course in classical mechanics.
This is a textbook that derives the fundamental theories of physics from symmetry. It starts by introducing, in a completely self-contained way, all mathematical tools needed to use symmetry ideas in physics. Thereafter, these tools are put into action and by using symmetry constraints, the fundamental equations of Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory, Electromagnetism, and Classical Mechanics are derived. As a result, the reader is able to understand the basic assumptions behind, and the connections between the modern theories of physics. The book concludes with first applications of the previously derived equations. Thanks to the input of readers from around the world, this second edition has been purged of typographical errors and also contains several revised sections with improved explanations.

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