Sea Charts of the British Isles takes the reader on a circumnavigation of 'these sceptred isles', as Shakespeare referred to them, to explore, through the chart, this mulititude of sea ports, fishing and commercial harbours, naval bases and dockyards, and sea-side havens that have supported local life, and defended and imported for the populace at large. Travelling along the coastline the book displays a beautiful collection of charts containing a wealth of information about Britain's maritime history and the story of charting and surveying itself. The great names in British chart-making are all included, such as Captain Greenvile Collins, Professor Murdoch Mackenzie and his nephew of the same name, Graeme Spence and William Bligh. Between them they created the first structured attempts to survey and chart particular areas of the coast of mainland Britain as well as the more remote islands. Examples include several from Collins' 'Great Britain's Coastal Pilot', such as charts of Edinburgh and the Forth, the Orkney Islands, the coast of Ireland and the River Thames; the Chart of the Coast of Wales in St George's Channel and that of Milford Haven by Lewis Morris; The River Clyde and Glasgow by John Watt; and the Observation by Trinity House Pilots and Surveyors of the Downs covering the coast of Kent and the Goodwin Sands, as well as charts by other well-known European chart-makers such as the magnificent example of the Coast of England from Dover to the Isle of Wight showing the Cinque Ports by Lucas Janszoon Wagenaer that dates from 1583. Maritime archives such as the Admiralty Library, the National Maritime Museum, the Pepys Library, the UK Hydrographic Office and the National Archives have yielded up their unseen nautical records to portray the development of the sea chart in our own coastal waters, and each is explained through extensive captions.
Coasts of Britain explores the geography and the geology of the British Isles by it's coastlines. Each chapter looks at a particular type of coastline and examines the impact that the physical make-up of the landscape has had on the economic and social development. The text is written in a lively and stimulating way and is punctuated by superb colour photographs and maps as well as Fact Files which highlight pertinent points! Written to support the National Curriculum at Key Stage 2 and 3.
Like most of us, Ian Vince used to think of the British countryside as average, unexciting - as dramatic as a nice cup of tea. Then, over the course of a single car journey, the features of our green and pleasant land reawakened a fascination with geology that he had long forgotten, and he began to delve beneath the surface (metaphorically, that is). From the rocks of north-west Scotland which are amongst the oldest on the planet to St Michael's Mount off the coast of Cornwall, which was still being shaped in human memory, The Lie of the Land takes us on a journey through a fantastically exotic Britain of red desert sands, shattering continental collisions and tides of volcanic lava. Ian Vince shows us how Britain came to look the way it does; and with warmth and wit transports us back through billions of years to a land that time forgot.
In 1806 a British expeditionary force captured Buenos Aires. Over the next eighteen months, Britain was sucked into a costly campaign on the far side of the world. The Spaniards were humbled on the battlefield and Montevideo was taken by storm, but the campaign ended in disaster when 6000 redcoats and riflemen surrendered following a bloody battle in the streets of the Argentine capital. So ended one of the most humiliating – and neglected – episodes of the entire Napoleonic Wars.??In The British Invasion of the River Plate Ben Hughes tells the story of this forgotten campaign in graphic detail. His account is based on research carried out across two continents. It draws on contemporary newspaper reports, official documents and the memoirs, letters and journals of the men who were there.??He describes the initially successful British invasion, which was stopped when their troops were surrounded in Buenos Aires’ main square and forced to surrender, and the second British attack which was eventually defeated too. His narrative covers the course of the entire campaign and its aftermath. While focusing on the military and political aspects of the campaign, his book gives an insight into the actions of the main protagonists – William Carr Beresford, Sir Home Popham, Santiago de Liniers and ‘Black Bob’ Craufurd – and into the experiences of the forgotten rank and file.??He also considers the long-term impact of the campaign on the fortunes of the opposing sides. Many of the British survivors went on to win glory in the Peninsular War. For the Uruguayans and Argentines, their victory gave them a sense of national pride that would eventually encourage them to wrest their independence from Spain.
The North Sea regions are some of the busiest shipping lanes in the world (which have recently seen the introduction of oil and gas rigs), and the surrounding land areas are some of the most populous. This book presents a historical investigation of great storms that have affected the North Sea and neighboring northern seas, the British Isles, and the fringe of northwest Europe. All those wind storms with serious effects that could be identified within the past 500-600 years are recorded and a few earlier cases discussed. In every case, observations of weather and other circumstances reported during the storm have been used to produce a modern and reasonably full meteorological analysis that will facilitate wind strength estimates and wind measurements and aid in the diagnosis of storm origins. As a scientific study, this work takes advantage of the unequaled abundance in this region of historical reports and records. The book is destined to further meteorological understanding and help examine weather trends and secular variations and the impact of storms on human affairs, especially in damage to buildings, forests, and other aspects of the landscape, particularly coasts. It will be of interest to atmospheric scientists, engineers, geographers, historians, and administrators.
This is the first book to be entirely devoted to the geomorphology and sedimentology of estuaries. The chapters in the book are structured according to the morphogenetic classification which is based on a new definition of estuaries and covers all areas within this field. The material is presented in such a way that it serves both as a reference for the researcher and as a textbook for use on courses covering estuaries, coastal environments, sedimentology and oceanography. Internationally renowned specialists have provided in-depth descriptions of the geomorphology, sedimentology and interactive processes associated with each particular subject.

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