Sea Charts of the British Isles takes the reader on a circumnavigation of 'these sceptred isles', as Shakespeare referred to them, to explore, through the chart, this mulititude of sea ports, fishing and commercial harbours, naval bases and dockyards, and sea-side havens that have supported local life, and defended and imported for the populace at large. Travelling along the coastline the book displays a beautiful collection of charts containing a wealth of information about Britain's maritime history and the story of charting and surveying itself. The great names in British chart-making are all included, such as Captain Greenvile Collins, Professor Murdoch Mackenzie and his nephew of the same name, Graeme Spence and William Bligh. Between them they created the first structured attempts to survey and chart particular areas of the coast of mainland Britain as well as the more remote islands. Examples include several from Collins' 'Great Britain's Coastal Pilot', such as charts of Edinburgh and the Forth, the Orkney Islands, the coast of Ireland and the River Thames; the Chart of the Coast of Wales in St George's Channel and that of Milford Haven by Lewis Morris; The River Clyde and Glasgow by John Watt; and the Observation by Trinity House Pilots and Surveyors of the Downs covering the coast of Kent and the Goodwin Sands, as well as charts by other well-known European chart-makers such as the magnificent example of the Coast of England from Dover to the Isle of Wight showing the Cinque Ports by Lucas Janszoon Wagenaer that dates from 1583. Maritime archives such as the Admiralty Library, the National Maritime Museum, the Pepys Library, the UK Hydrographic Office and the National Archives have yielded up their unseen nautical records to portray the development of the sea chart in our own coastal waters, and each is explained through extensive captions.
Coasts of Britain explores the geography and the geology of the British Isles by it's coastlines. Each chapter looks at a particular type of coastline and examines the impact that the physical make-up of the landscape has had on the economic and social development. The text is written in a lively and stimulating way and is punctuated by superb colour photographs and maps as well as Fact Files which highlight pertinent points! Written to support the National Curriculum at Key Stage 2 and 3.
The three volumes of A History of the Peoples of the British Isles weave together the histories of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales and their peoples. The authors trace the course of social, economic, cultural and political history from prehistoric times to the present, analyzing the relationships, differences and similarities of the four areas. Covering British history from prehistoric times to 1688, Volume I's main themes include: * the development of prehistoric, Roman and Anglo-Saxon Britain * discussions of family and class structures * Medieval British history * the Stuart and Tudor leaderships * the arts and intellectual developments from 1485 to 1688. Presenting a wealth of material on themes such as women's history, the family, religion, intellectual history, society, politics, and the arts, these volumes are an important resource for all students of the political and cultural heritage of the British Isles.
This book is a history of Christianity from its earliest beginnings to the end of the twentieth century. The book provides students with an introduction to the many persons, places, movements, and events necessary for the telling of our story, the story of the Church. This history of Christianity is told in its essentials, simply and straightforwardly for students with little or no experience in the academic study of religion. It is a story told within the complex contexts of larger world events and world cultures, but defined and simplified by attention to those developments which have proven most influential for the past and present shaping of Church thought and practice. The book is a comprehensive and definitive introduction to the history of Christianity. It provides students with the necessary outline and description of the broad sweep of movements and periods in this history, but it also pauses at important points to provide details about the lives of Christians as lived at various times and in various locations. This story is told in easy-to-understand prose and with illustrative photographs, maps and charts.
This “interesting, insightful book” by the author of Deep South reveals “a side of Britain few visitors see” (The New York Times Book Review). After eleven years as an American living in London, the renowned travel writer Paul Theroux set out to travel clockwise around the coast of Great Britain to find out what the British were really like. The result is this perceptive, hilarious record of the journey. Whether in Cornwall or Wales, Ulster or Scotland, the people he encountered along the way revealed far more of themselves than they perhaps intended to display to a stranger. Theroux captured their rich and varied conversational commentary with caustic wit and penetrating insight. “A sharp and funny descriptive writer . . . Theroux is a good companion.” —The Times (London)
"Everyone should have two copies - one for the car and one for the house to plan journeys. . . a reminder to think more about the places you pass and less about your route, because every British journey is through rich history." (Edward Stourton) From much-loved historian Neil Oliver, comes this beautifully written, kaleidoscopic history of a place with a story like no other. The British Isles, this archipelago of islands, is to Neil Oliver the best place in the world. From north to south, east to west it cradles astonishing beauty. The human story here is a million years old, and counting. But the tolerant, easygoing peace we enjoy has been hard won. We have made and known the best and worst of times. We have been hero and villain and all else in between, and we have learned some lessons. The Story of the British Isles in 100 Places is Neil’s very personal account of what makes these islands so special, told through the places that have witnessed the unfolding of our history. Beginning with footprints made in the sand by humankind’s earliest ancestors, he takes us via Romans and Vikings, the flowering of religion, through civil war, industrial revolution and two world wars. From windswept headlands to battlefields, ancient trees to magnificent cathedrals, each of his destinations is a place where, somehow, the spirit of the past seems to linger.
This comprehensive reference work describes and illustrates some 200 types of inshore craft that once fished and traded, under oar and sail, around the coasts of the British Isles. The types are arranged by coastal area and each is described in terms of its shape and design, fitness for location and purpose, build, evolution and geographical distribution. Details of dimensions, rig, building materials, seamanship and the survival of examples are given where known, while hundreds of line drawings and photographs show the vessels in their original forms. A team of twelve experts describe all these boat types and, in addition, there are introductions to the main geographic areas outlining the physical environments, fisheries and other uses of the sea that have influenced boat design; maps of all the areas show ports and physical features. At the beginning of the last century sail and oar dominated fisheries and local trade: one hundred years later those craft have all but vanished. This book brings alive for maritime historians and enthusiasts, traditional boat sailors, modelmakers, and all those with an interest in local history, the vast array of craft that were once such a significant feature of our inshore seas. ‘Inshore Craft is a spectacular achievement’ - Wooden Boat Magazine
The main intent of this book is to prepare the North American sailor for his first crossing of the Atlantic to Europe. It is actually so exhaustive in its coverage that it will indeed help the bluewater sailor to learn how to cross any ocean in the world.
Winner of the 'Travel Narrative Book of the Year' in 2005 by the British Guild of Travel Writers (BGTW), 'The Coast Road' presents an idiosyncratic and illuminating snapshot of England and what it is to be English today. In this travelogue, award-winning writer Paul Gogarty travels 3,000 miles in a motorhome, exploring intimate coastal communities and ruminating on the future of the English coast. All points of the compass are covered; after an unsettling benediction at Dover's Eastern Docks he travels to Derek Jarman's Dungeness; to rakish Brighton and Madame Rosina's Bournemouth; the mudflats and Arabian sands of the north-west, where he joins a roomful of George Formbys in Blackpool; the now infamous Morcambe Bay; Billy Butlin's Skegness; and a parachuting vicar. The journey comes full circle in the secret creeks of East Anglia. 'The Coast Road' is a warm-hearted tribute to England's coastline written by a romantic spirit who beautifully captures both the idiosyncrasies of the nation and the euphoria of the open road. 'The Coast Road' was also the recent winner of the British Guild of Travel Writers Best Narrative Travel Book Award.
The fully revisied second edition of Wild Swimming Coast now includes even more for walkers, swimmers and explorers: Full national coverage of Britain's most beautiful beaches Lagoons, sea caves and amazing places to snorkel. New 1:10,000 Ordnance Survey mapping Best beach cafes, local food, pubs and campsites Where to sea kayak, coasteer and swim with dolphins Best activities with children and families This revised and expanded edition of the best-selling coastal classic features the same winning formula of stunning photography, engaging travel writing and practical guidance. It is set to continue as the definitive guide to Britain's secret beaches and hidden coastline.
Highlights both the conservation value of the coastal geomorphology sites of Great Britain and the important role these sites play in the development of the science of geomorphology. Each chapter in this work includes descriptions of the landforms and gives interpretation of dynamics of the geomorphological systems operating within the sites.
The North Sea regions are some of the busiest shipping lanes in the world (which have recently seen the introduction of oil and gas rigs), and the surrounding land areas are some of the most populous. This book presents a historical investigation of great storms that have affected the North Sea and neighboring northern seas, the British Isles, and the fringe of northwest Europe. All those wind storms with serious effects that could be identified within the past 500-600 years are recorded and a few earlier cases discussed. In every case, observations of weather and other circumstances reported during the storm have been used to produce a modern and reasonably full meteorological analysis that will facilitate wind strength estimates and wind measurements and aid in the diagnosis of storm origins. As a scientific study, this work takes advantage of the unequaled abundance in this region of historical reports and records. The book is destined to further meteorological understanding and help examine weather trends and secular variations and the impact of storms on human affairs, especially in damage to buildings, forests, and other aspects of the landscape, particularly coasts. It will be of interest to atmospheric scientists, engineers, geographers, historians, and administrators.

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