Inhalt: Birgit TAUTZ: Introduction: Color and Ethnic Difference or Ways of Seeing Part I: 1800 Gudrun HENTGES: Die Erfindung der 'Rasse' um 1800 - Klima, Säfte und Phlogiston in de Rassentheorie Immanuel Kants Wendy SUTHERLAND: Black Skin, White Skin and the Aesthetics of the Female Body in: Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Ziegler's Die Mohrinn Daniel PURDY: The Whiteness of Beauty: Weimar Neo-Classicism and the Sculptural Transcendence of Color Assenka OKSILOFF: The Eye of the Ethnographer: Adalbert von Chamisso's Voyage Around the World Part II: 1900 Thomas R. MILLER: Seeing Eyes, Reading Bodies: Visuality, Race and Color Perception or a Threshold in the History of Human Sciences Andreas MICHEL: "Our European Arrogance": Wilhelm Worringer and Carl Einstein on Non-European Art Nana BADENBERG: Mohrenwäschen, Völkerschauen: Der Konsum des Schwarzen um 1900 Fatima EL-TAYEB: "We are Germans, We are Whites, and We Want to Stay White!" African Germans and Citizenship in the early 20th Century Part III: 2000 Uli LINKE: Shame on the Skin: Post-Holocaust Memory and the German Aesthetics of Whiteness Christine ACHINGER: Colouring the invisible: The figure of the 'black drug dealer' as a projection of socially produced fears Helen CAFFERTY: Orfeo and Sam: Racial, Sexual, and Ethnic Otherness in Dörrie's Keiner liebt mich (1994) and Sanoussi-Bliss' Zurück auf los (1999) Birgit TAUTZ: Epilog: Farblose Räume
The Woman of Colour is a unique literary account of a black heiress’ life immediately after the abolition of the British slave trade. Olivia Fairfield, the biracial heroine and orphaned daughter of a slaveholder, must travel from Jamaica to England, and as a condition of her father’s will either marry her Caucasian first cousin or become dependent on his mercenary elder brother and sister-in-law. As Olivia decides between these two conflicting possibilities, her letters recount her impressions of Britain and its inhabitants as only a black woman could record them. She gives scathing descriptions of London, Bristol, and the British, as well as progressive critiques of race, racism, and slavery. The narrative follows her life from the heights of her arranged marriage to its swift descent into annulment and destitution, only to culminate in her resurrection as a self-proclaimed “widow” who flouts the conventional marriage plot. The appendices, which include contemporary reviews of the novel, historical documents on race and inheritance in Jamaica, and examples of other women of colour in early British prose fiction, will further inspire readers to rethink issues of race, gender, class, and empire from an African woman’s perspective.
There is no overarching master narrative in understanding the history of German colonialism, and over the past decade, the study of Germany’s colonial past has experienced a dramatic transformation in its scope of inquiry. Influenced by new theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of race, nationalism, and globalization, these new studies initiate a process of reevaluating and redefining the parameters within which German Colonialism is understood. The role of visual materials, in particular, is ideal for exploring the porousness of disciplinary boundaries, though visual culture studies pertaining to German history – and especially German colonialism – have previously been almost completely neglected. Investigating visual communication and mass culture, print culture and suggestive racial politics, racial aesthetics, racial politics and early German film, racial continuity and German film, and photography, German Colonialism, Visual Culture, and Modern Memory offers compelling evidence of a German society between 1884 and 1919 that produced vibrant and heterogeneous – and at times contradictory – cultures of colonialism. This collection of new essays illustrates the dramatic changes and vast array of perspectives that have recently emerged in the study of German colonialism. In documenting the latest cutting-edge research of German colonial history, the contributors to this volume prove wrong the persistent assumptions that the creation of Germany’s colonial empire did not have any lasting impact on German political and cultural life. Their essays document how colonialism in its various forms was entwined with the inner workings of modern German life and society, especially through the cultural and technical innovations of its time. In contrast to existing research, these studies show that colonial Germany played a significant role in shaping German perceptions of racial difference, influenced German support for World War I, and facilitated the construction of German nationalism. German Colonialism, Visual Culture, and Modern Memory uniquely demonstrates that the visual culture of colonialism is closely linked to the fascination with new modes of seeing and the enigma of visual experience that have become trademarks of modernity.
In this brief, Mary Virginia Orna details the history of color from the chemical point of view. Beginning with the first recorded uses of color and ending in the development of our modern chemical industry, this rich, yet concise exposition shows us how color pervades every aspect of our lives. Our consciousness, our perceptions, our useful appliances and tools, our playthings, our entertainment, our health, and our diagnostic apparatus – all involve color and are based in no small part on chemistry.
From antiquity to the present day, color has been embedded with cultural meaning. Associated with blood, fire, fertility, and life force, the color red has always been extremely difficult to achieve and thus highly prized." "This book discusses the origin of the red colorant derived from the insect cochineal, its early use in Precolumbian ritual textiles from Mexico and Peru, and the spread of the American dyestuff through cultural interchange following the Spanish discovery and conquest of the New World in the 16th century. Drawing on examples from the collections of the Metropolitan Museum, it documents the use of this red-colored treasure in several media and throughout the world.
This book investigates the contested ways in which eighteenth-century German philosophers, scientists, poets, and dramatists perceived and represented China and Africa from 1680 to 1830. Tautz demonstrates in compelling ways that reading China allowed for the integration of cultural difference into Enlightenment universalism, whereas seeing Africa exposed irreducible differences that undermined any claims of universality. By working through the case of eighteenth-century Germany and Europe, the book adds an important cross-cultural and historical dimension to questions relevant to our world today.
The leading resource for collaborative critical care for newborns, Merenstein & Gardner’s Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care, 7th Edition provides a multidisciplinary approach and a real-world perspective. It focuses on evidenced-based practice, with clinical directions in color for easy retrieval and review. Special features help you prioritize the steps in initial care, and provide a guide to sharing information with parents. With each chapter written jointly by both physicians and nurses, this book is comprehensive enough to suit the needs of the entire team in your neonatal intensive care unit. Unique! A multidisciplinary perspective is provided by an editorial team of two physicians and two nurses, and each chapter is written and reviewed by a physician and nurse team, so information mirrors the real-world experience in a neonatal intensive care unit. Unique! Clinical content is in color, so you can quickly scan through chapters for information that directly affects patient care. Unique! Parent Teaching boxes highlight the relevant information to be shared with a patient’s caregivers. Critical Findings boxes outline symptoms and diagnostic findings that require immediate attention, helping you prioritize assessment data and steps in initial care. Coverage in clinical chapters includes pathophysiology and etiology, prevention, data collection, treatment, complications, outcomes, prognosis, and parent education. Expanded Neonatal Surgery chapter covers all of the most common procedures in neonatal surgery. Follow-up of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Infant chapter is expanded to include coverage of outcomes management and discharge planning. Streamlined references are updated to include only the most current or classic sources.
In Translating the World, Birgit Tautz provides a new narrative of German literary history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Departing from dominant modes of thought regarding the nexus of literary and national imagination, she examines this intersection through the lens of Germany’s emerging global networks and how they were rendered in two very different German cities: Hamburg and Weimar. German literary history has tended to employ a conceptual framework that emphasizes the nation or idealized citizenry; yet the experiences of readers in eighteenth-century German cities existed within the context of their local environments, in which daily life occurred and writers such as Lessing, Schiller, and Goethe worked. Hamburg, a flourishing literary city in the late eighteenth century, was eventually relegated to the margins of German historiography, while Weimar, then a small town with an insular worldview, would become mythologized for not only its literary history but its centrality in national German culture. By interrogating the histories of and texts associated with these cities, Tautz shows how literary styles and genres are born of local, rather than national, interaction with the world. Her examination of how texts intersect and interact reveals how they shape and transform the urban cultural landscape as they are translated and move throughout the world. A fresh, elegant exploration of literary translation, discursive shifts, and global cultural changes, Translating the World is an exciting new story of eighteenth-century German culture and its relationship to expanding global networks that will especially interest scholars of comparative literature, German studies, and literary history.
Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment. Richly illustrated, this book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning— a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history—including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.
A widely influential book--revised to reveal racial privilege at work in the 21st century.

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