This collection surveys the tradition of medieval commentaries on Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" from its thirteenth-century origins to the fifteenth century, concentrating on the conception of the moral and intellectual virtues in a continuous interplay of ancient and Christian moral thought.
Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562) was a scriptural exegete, but also an Aristotelian philosopher. His voluminous commentaries on Old and New Testament books are complemented by this volume, the only one of its kind in his corpus. It provides a window into the complex world of early modern European philosophical translation and commentary, as well as the theology and ethics of the Reformed camp.
The fine editions of the Aristotelian Commentary Series make available long out-of-print commentaries of St. Thomas on Aristotle. Each volume has the full text of Aristotle with Bekker numbers, followed by the commentary of St. Thomas, cross-referenced using an easily accessible mode of referring to Aristotle in the Commentary. Each volume is beautifully printed and bound using the finest materials. All copies are printed on acid-free paper and Smyth sewn. They will last.
Given the enduring importance of Aristotle s "Nicomachean Ethics," it is remarkable to find that there is no extensive surviving commentary on this text from the period between the second century and the twelfth century. This volume is focused on the first of the medieval commentaries, that produced in the early twelfth century by Eustratios of Nicaea, Michael of Ephesus, and an anonymous author in Constantinople. This endeavor was to have a significant impact on the reception of the "Nicomachean Ethics" in Latin and Catholic Europe. For, in the mid-thirteenth century, Robert Grosseteste translated into Latin a manuscript that contained these Byzantine commentators. Both Albertus Magnus and Bonaventure then used this translation as a basis for their discussions of Aristotle's book. Contributors are George Arabatzis, Charles Barber, Linos Benakis, Elizabeth Fisher, Peter Frankopan, Katerina Ierodiakonou, David Jenkins, Anthony Kaldellis and Michele Trizio.
Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562) was a scriptural exegete, but also an Aristotelian philosopher. His voluminous commentaries on Old and New Testament books are complemented by this volume, the only one of its kind in his corpus. It provides a window into the complex world of early modern European philosophical translation and commentary, as well as the theology and ethics of the Reformed camp. Theological commentaries on Aristotle are an important part of the history of the philosophy-theology connection. Thomas Aquinas is an outstanding example, and Peter Martyr Vermigli follows in his steps. This lecture series, given at Strasbourg 1553-56, provides a running commentary, showing the positive take on Aristotle, along with the decisive criterion of scripture. It is a major contribution to the debate on Reformed scholasticism, which casts Beza, Vermigli, and Zanchi as protagonists. It supports the thesis of Richard Muller and others that scholasticism is a method rather than a position, a pedagogical mode of organizing doctrine in behalf of clarity and interior logic.
Reading both philosophical and theological texts, this book presents an argument against nostalgia: against the myth of a Golden Age, against the posture that sees "modernity" as a problem to be solved.
Until the launch of this series nearly twenty years ago, the 15,000 volumes of the ancient Greek commentators on Aristotle, written mainly between 200 and 600 AD, constituted the largest corpus of extant Greek philosophical writings not translated into English or other European languages. Aspasius' commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, of which six books have come down to us, is the oldest surviving Greek commentary on any of Aristotle's works, dating to the middle of the second century AD. It offers precious insight into the thinking and pedagogical methods of the Peripatetic school in the early Roman Empire, and provides illuminating discussions of numerous technical points in Aristotle's treatise, along with valuable excursuses on such topics as the nature of the emotions. This is the first complete translation of Aspasius' work in any modern language.
Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the text which had the single greatest influence on Aquinas's ethical writings, and the historical and philosophical value of Aquinas's appropriation of this text provokes lively debate. In this volume of new essays, thirteen distinguished scholars explore how Aquinas receives, expands on and transforms Aristotle's insights about the attainability of happiness, the scope of moral virtue, the foundation of morality and the nature of pleasure. They examine Aquinas's commentary on the Ethics and his theological writings, above all the Summa theologiae. Their essays show Aquinas to be a highly perceptive interpreter, but one who also brings certain presuppositions to the Ethics and alters key Aristotelian notions for his own purposes. The result is a rich and nuanced picture of Aquinas's relation to Aristotle that will be of interest to readers in moral philosophy, Aquinas studies, the history of theology and the history of philosophy.
This book, written by well-known students of Etienne Gilson and especially dedicated to Armand A. Maurer, helps inaugurate a long-overdue special series in philosophy honoring Gilson s legendary scholarship. It presents wide-ranging expositions of Thomist realism in the tradition of Gilsonian humanism covering themes related to philosophy in general, historical method, aesthetics, metaphysics, epistemology, and politics."
This book comprises essays on the nature of Aspasius’ commentary, his interpretation of Aristotle, and his own place in the history of thought. The contributions are in English or Italian. Aspasius’ commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics is the earliest ancient commentary on Aristotle of which extensive parts survive in their original form. It is important both for the history of commentary as a genre and for the history of philosophical thought in the first two centuries A.D.; it is also still valuable as what its author intended it to be, an aid in interpreting the Ethics. All three aspects are explored by the essays. The book is not formally a commentary on Aspasius’ commentary; but between them the essays consider the interpretation of numerous problematic or significant passages. Full indices will enable readers quickly to locate discussion of particular parts of Aspasius’ work. This volume of essays will form a natural complement to the first ever translation of Aspasius’ commentary into any modern language, currently in preparation by Paul Mercken.
A confluence of scholarly interest has resulted in a revival of Thomistic scholarship across the world. Several areas in the investigation of St. Thomas Aquinas, however, remain under-explored. This volume contributes to two of these neglected areas. First, the volume evaluates the contemporary relevance of St. Thomas's views for the philosophy and practice of education. The second area explored involves the intersections of the Angelic Doctor’s thought and the numerous cultures and intellectual traditions of the East. Contributors to this section examine the reception, creative appropriation, and various points of convergence between St. Thomas and the East.
Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the first and arguably most important treatise on ethics in Western philosophy. It remains to this day a compelling reflection on the best sort of human life and continues to inspire contemporary thought and debate. This Cambridge Companion includes twenty essays by leading scholars of Aristotle and ancient philosophy that cover the major issues of this text. The essays in this volume shed light on Aristotle's rigorous and challenging thinking on questions such as: can there be a practical science of ethics? What is happiness? Are we responsible for our character? How does moral virtue relate to good thinking? Can we act against our reasoned choice? What is friendship? Is the contemplative life the highest kind of life? Covering all sections of the Nicomachean Ethics and selected topics in Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics and Protrepticus, this volume offers the reader a solid foundation in Aristotle's ethical philosophy.
An excellent new translation and commentary. It will serve newcomers as an informative, accessible introduction to the Nicomachean Ethics and to many issues in Aristotle’s philosophy, but also has much to offer advanced scholars. The commentary is noteworthy for its frequent citations of relevant passages from other works in Aristotle’s corpus, which often shed new light on the texts. Reeve’s translation is meticulous: it hits the virtuous mean--accurate and technical, yet readable--between translation’s vicious extremes of faithlessness and indigestibility.--Jessica Moss, New York University
This dissertation seeks to establish that there is a renaissance of Thomistic Philosophy in the Post-Conciliar Catholic Church, specifically a reawakening of Scholasticism, as evidenced by Pope John Paul II in his encyclical Veritatis Splendor. The Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) ushered in a new era for the Roman Catholic religion prompted by the desire of Pope John XXIII to have the 2,000 year old institution catch up with the modern world and address current problems as well as present the ancient faith in contemporary ways. Prior to Vatican II, there was a monolithic way to explain faith and reason. Theology and Philosophy were rigidly taught via textbook manuals according to a norm established under Pope Pius X who vigorously denounced the errors of Modernism in his encyclical Pascendi (1907). His immediate predecessor, Pope Leo XIII had issued Aeterni Patris (1879) which directed a restoration of the pre-eminence of Thomistic philosophy. Unfortunately, the neo-Thomism of the Leonine papacy was not as resilient as the classical Thomism before it.The staunch Thomism which existed from 1879 to 1965 had been preceded by an era of anti-Scholasticism among the European centers of learning during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Protestant Reformation, the advent of Humanism and the chaos of the French Revolution proved to be formidable foes for Thomistic philosophy. Scholastic reasoning alone could not address the Biblical questions being posed by Luther and the other Reformers. Logical distinctions which are the hallmark of Thomism were too complicated for world which at times violently left the Mediaeval era behind it.Leo XIII after the conclusion of the Napoleonic wars and while Europe was relatively at peace, saw the need to resurrect the philosophy he deemed perennially valid to combat religious and political errors which he saw as the causes for the wars and discord among peoples and nations. Leonine strategy was to aggressively promote and proliferate a centralized control over Catholic education, especially at the seminary and university levels. The first half of the twentieth century ironically experienced the horrors of two world wars and demonstrated the depth of human depravity and capacity for evil. No one, however, in 1879 could have envisioned the wars, hot and cold, which would define global existence.Just as Aquinas was originally suspected and rejected by many of his contemporaries in the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries and later vindicated in glory, so, too, Thomistic Philosophy would wax and wane through the centuries. The aftermath of Vatican II when the Latin Mass was replaced with the vernacular and ecumenical dialogue was sought with the non-Catholic religions, Thomism again took a back seat. Post-Conciliar scholars of philosophy and theology wanted to break the chains of manual style textbooks. Existentialism and Phenomenology were the predominant philosophies. Thomistic Philosophy and Scholasticism were viewed as relics of the past. Thirty years after the Second Vatican Council, Pope John Paul II, known for his penchant for Phenomenology and Personalism, issues Veritatis Splendor which in essence restores the pride of place the Natural Moral Law doctrine once held before. A true student and subscriber to the moral reasoning used in Humanae Vitae (1967) by Pope Paul VI, John Paul II shakes the dust in Catholic intelligentsia by canonizing the Natural Moral Law as the only valid means to do good moral theology. Veritatis Splendor ignited a firestorm of debate, essays, discussions and dissertations on the age old principle known as the Natural Law.This paper intends to show the development of the Natural Moral Law doctrine from its beginnings to its most famous herald followed by a systematic review of Veritatis Splendor in order to show that Thomism is indeed alive and well in Catholic thought and has once again captured the imprimatur of Papal endorsement.
The principles used in the translation of the Ethics are the same as those in the translations of the Physics and the Metaphysics, and their main function is to help the reader get Aristotle's meaning as accurately as possible. Briefly, they are principles of terminology and of thought, some of which will be repeated here. English terms common to all three translations have the same mean ings, with a few exceptions, and many terms proper to ethics are added. Many of the terms in the Glossary are defined or are made known dia lectically or in some other way. For the term 1tpOUiPEcrt~ the term 'inten tion' or the expression 'deliberate choice' will be used instead of the term 'choice', but the definition will be the same as that given in the Physics and the Metaphysics. Difficulties arise from some allied terms or terms close in meaning, e. g. , the terms UUAOC;, KUKOC;, ~OXeT\PO~, and 1tovT\p0C;, for the exact differences of their meanings are not ascertainable from the extant works. Each of these terms, however, seems to be used consistently, and we shall assume such consistency. The choice of the corresponding English terms can only be suggested by the usage of the Greek terms and by induction.
Written by one of the most important founding figures of Western philosophy, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics represents a critical point in the study of ethics which has influenced the direction of modern philosophy. The Routledge Guidebook to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics introduces the major themes in Aristotle’s great book and acts as a companion for reading this key work, examining: The context of Aristotle’s work and the background to his writing Each separate part of the text in relation to its goals, meanings and impact The reception the book received when first seen by the world The relevance of Aristotle’s work to modern philosophy, its legacy and influence. With further reading included throughout, this text is essential reading for all students of philosophy, and all those wishing to get to grips with this classic work.

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