The fine editions of the Aristotelian Commentary Series make available long out-of-print commentaries of St. Thomas on Aristotle. Each volume has the full text of Aristotle with Bekker numbers, followed by the commentary of St. Thomas, cross-referenced using an easily accessible mode of referring to Aristotle in the Commentary.Each volume is beautifully printed and bound using the finest materials. All copies are printed on acid-free paper and Smyth sewn. They will last.
This collection surveys the tradition of medieval commentaries on Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" from its thirteenth-century origins to the fifteenth century, concentrating on the conception of the moral and intellectual virtues in a continuous interplay of ancient and Christian moral thought.
Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562) was a scriptural exegete, but also an Aristotelian philosopher. His voluminous commentaries on Old and New Testament books are complemented by this volume, the only one of its kind in his corpus. It provides a window into the complex world of early modern European philosophical translation and commentary, as well as the theology and ethics of the Reformed camp. Theological commentaries on Aristotle are an important part of the history of the philosophy-theology connection. Thomas Aquinas is an outstanding example, and Peter Martyr Vermigli follows in his steps. This lecture series, given at Strasbourg 1553-56, provides a running commentary, showing the positive take on Aristotle, along with the decisive criterion of scripture. It is a major contribution to the debate on Reformed scholasticism, which casts Beza, Vermigli, and Zanchi as protagonists. It supports the thesis of Richard Muller and others that scholasticism is a method rather than a position, a pedagogical mode of organizing doctrine in behalf of clarity and interior logic.
Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the text which had the single greatest influence on Aquinas's ethical writings, and the historical and philosophical value of Aquinas's appropriation of this text provokes lively debate. In this volume of new essays, thirteen distinguished scholars explore how Aquinas receives, expands on and transforms Aristotle's insights about the attainability of happiness, the scope of moral virtue, the foundation of morality and the nature of pleasure. They examine Aquinas's commentary on the Ethics and his theological writings, above all the Summa theologiae. Their essays show Aquinas to be a highly perceptive interpreter, but one who also brings certain presuppositions to the Ethics and alters key Aristotelian notions for his own purposes. The result is a rich and nuanced picture of Aquinas's relation to Aristotle that will be of interest to readers in moral philosophy, Aquinas studies, the history of theology and the history of philosophy.
Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499-1562) was a scriptural exegete, but also an Aristotelian philosopher. His voluminous commentaries on Old and New Testament books are complemented by this volume, the only one of its kind in his corpus. It provides a window into the complex world of early modern European philosophical translation and commentary, as well as the theology and ethics of the Reformed camp.
Presents Aristotle's celebrated work setting forth his system of moral philosophy.
This book comprises essays on the nature of Aspasius’ commentary, his interpretation of Aristotle, and his own place in the history of thought. The contributions are in English or Italian. Aspasius’ commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics is the earliest ancient commentary on Aristotle of which extensive parts survive in their original form. It is important both for the history of commentary as a genre and for the history of philosophical thought in the first two centuries A.D.; it is also still valuable as what its author intended it to be, an aid in interpreting the Ethics. All three aspects are explored by the essays. The book is not formally a commentary on Aspasius’ commentary; but between them the essays consider the interpretation of numerous problematic or significant passages. Full indices will enable readers quickly to locate discussion of particular parts of Aspasius’ work. This volume of essays will form a natural complement to the first ever translation of Aspasius’ commentary into any modern language, currently in preparation by Paul Mercken.
Given the enduring importance of Aristotle s "Nicomachean Ethics," it is remarkable to find that there is no extensive surviving commentary on this text from the period between the second century and the twelfth century. This volume is focused on the first of the medieval commentaries, that produced in the early twelfth century by Eustratios of Nicaea, Michael of Ephesus, and an anonymous author in Constantinople. This endeavor was to have a significant impact on the reception of the "Nicomachean Ethics" in Latin and Catholic Europe. For, in the mid-thirteenth century, Robert Grosseteste translated into Latin a manuscript that contained these Byzantine commentators. Both Albertus Magnus and Bonaventure then used this translation as a basis for their discussions of Aristotle's book. Contributors are George Arabatzis, Charles Barber, Linos Benakis, Elizabeth Fisher, Peter Frankopan, Katerina Ierodiakonou, David Jenkins, Anthony Kaldellis and Michele Trizio.
Mit diesem Band liegt neben der Nikomachischen und der Eudemischen die dritte Version der Ethik des Aristoteles vor. Im Unterschied zu den beiden anderen Ethiken geht es hier um eine Tugend- und Güterlehre, nicht um ein umfassendes Konzept einer Eudämonie. Über die zeitliche Reihenfolge der ethischen Texte des Aristoteles besteht bisher keine Einigkeit. Somit schien es dem Bearbeiter zweckmäßig, Satz für Satz der Gedankendarstellung nachzugehen und auf diese Weise den ersten vollständigen Kommentar zu schaffen. Er kommt zu dem Schluss, dass die "Magna Moralia" nicht als nacharistotelische Kompilation aus Nikomachischer und Eudemischer Ethik begriffen werden könne, sie sich auch nicht zeitlich als "Mittlere Ethik" einreihen lasse, sondern die früheste Skizze des Aristoteles selbst sei. Wenn irgendwo, so ist also innerhalb der Ethik die Möglichkeit gegeben, Aristoteles sukzessive am Werk zu sehen.
Until the launch of this series nearly twenty years ago, the 15,000 volumes of the ancient Greek commentators on Aristotle, written mainly between 200 and 600 AD, constituted the largest corpus of extant Greek philosophical writings not translated into English or other European languages. Aspasius' commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, of which six books have come down to us, is the oldest surviving Greek commentary on any of Aristotle's works, dating to the middle of the second century AD. It offers precious insight into the thinking and pedagogical methods of the Peripatetic school in the early Roman Empire, and provides illuminating discussions of numerous technical points in Aristotle's treatise, along with valuable excursuses on such topics as the nature of the emotions. This is the first complete translation of Aspasius' work in any modern language.
Reading both philosophical and theological texts, this book presents an argument against nostalgia: against the myth of a Golden Age, against the posture that sees "modernity" as a problem to be solved.
Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the first and arguably most important treatise on ethics in Western philosophy. It remains to this day a compelling reflection on the best sort of human life and continues to inspire contemporary thought and debate. This Cambridge Companion includes twenty essays by leading scholars of Aristotle and ancient philosophy that cover the major issues of this text. The essays in this volume shed light on Aristotle's rigorous and challenging thinking on questions such as: can there be a practical science of ethics? What is happiness? Are we responsible for our character? How does moral virtue relate to good thinking? Can we act against our reasoned choice? What is friendship? Is the contemplative life the highest kind of life? Covering all sections of the Nicomachean Ethics and selected topics in Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics and Protrepticus, this volume offers the reader a solid foundation in Aristotle's ethical philosophy.
This book, written by well-known students of Etienne Gilson and especially dedicated to Armand A. Maurer, helps inaugurate a long-overdue special series in philosophy honoring Gilson s legendary scholarship. It presents wide-ranging expositions of Thomist realism in the tradition of Gilsonian humanism covering themes related to philosophy in general, historical method, aesthetics, metaphysics, epistemology, and politics."
A confluence of scholarly interest has resulted in a revival of Thomistic scholarship across the world. Several areas in the investigation of St. Thomas Aquinas, however, remain under-explored. This volume contributes to two of these neglected areas. First, the volume evaluates the contemporary relevance of St. Thomas's views for the philosophy and practice of education. The second area explored involves the intersections of the Angelic Doctor’s thought and the numerous cultures and intellectual traditions of the East. Contributors to this section examine the reception, creative appropriation, and various points of convergence between St. Thomas and the East.
The principles used in the translation of the Ethics are the same as those in the translations of the Physics and the Metaphysics, and their main function is to help the reader get Aristotle's meaning as accurately as possible. Briefly, they are principles of terminology and of thought, some of which will be repeated here. English terms common to all three translations have the same mean ings, with a few exceptions, and many terms proper to ethics are added. Many of the terms in the Glossary are defined or are made known dia lectically or in some other way. For the term 1tpOUiPEcrt~ the term 'inten tion' or the expression 'deliberate choice' will be used instead of the term 'choice', but the definition will be the same as that given in the Physics and the Metaphysics. Difficulties arise from some allied terms or terms close in meaning, e. g. , the terms UUAOC;, KUKOC;, ~OXeT\PO~, and 1tovT\p0C;, for the exact differences of their meanings are not ascertainable from the extant works. Each of these terms, however, seems to be used consistently, and we shall assume such consistency. The choice of the corresponding English terms can only be suggested by the usage of the Greek terms and by induction.
"Uniformly distinguished. . . . The cream of the philosophical thinking that has been done by students of Aristotle in this country and in Britain in the last few years. This compilation will mark a high point of excellence in its genre."--Gregory Vlastos, University of California, Berkeley

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