The principal thesis of Companions in Crime is that deviant behavior is predominantly social behavior.
Die Konzentration von Kriminalität und Gewalt in sozial benachteiligten Wohnquartieren erfährt in Zeiten wachsender sozialer Spaltungen zunehmende Aufmerksamkeit. Die Annahme, dass Segregationsprozesse und räumliche Armutskonzentrationen in Großstädten Jugendkriminalität verschärfen können, ist weit verbreitet und hat in der Stadt- und Kriminalsoziologie insbesondere in den USA im letzten Jahrzehnt eine bedeutende Renaissance erfahren. Mithilfe neuer statistischer Verfahren wie der Mehrebenenanalyse ist es möglich, eigenständige Effekte des sozialräumlichen Kontextes auf das Verhalten der Bewohner genauer zu untersuchen. Der Sammelband greift diese neue Forschungsrichtung auf und vereinigt erstmals aktuelle deutsche und internationale Studien zu Kontexteffekten auf Jugendkriminalität und Kriminalitätswahrnehmungen der Bewohner. Die Studien werden ergänzt durch ausführliche theoretische Beiträge aus stadt- und kriminalsoziologischer Perspektive sowie durch methodisch orientierte Beiträge.
Criminology is in a period of much theoretical ferment. Older theories have been revitalized, and newer theories have been set forth. The very richness of our thinking about crime, however, leads to questions about the relative merits of these competing paradigms. Accordingly, in this volume advocates of prominent theories are asked to "take stock" of their perspectives. Their challenge is to assess the empirical status of their theory and to map out future directions for theoretical development. The volume begins with an assessment of three perspectives that have long been at the core of criminology: social learning theory, control theory, and strain theory. Drawing on these traditions, two major contemporary macro-level theories of crime have emerged and are here reviewed: institutional-anomie theory and collective efficacy theory. Critical criminology has yielded diverse contributions discussed in essays on feminist theories, radical criminology, peacemaking criminology, and the effects of racial segregation. The volume includes chapters examining Moffitt's insights on life-course persistent/adolescent-limited anti-social behavior and Sampson and Laub's life-course theory of crime. In addition, David Farrington provides a comprehensive assessment of the adequacy of the leading developmental and life-course theories of crime. Finally, Taking Stock presents essays that review the status of perspectives that have direct implications for the use of criminological knowledge to control crime. Taken together, these chapters provide a comprehensive update of the field's leading theories of crime. The volume will be of interest to criminological scholars and will be ideal for classroom use in courses reviewing contemporary theories of criminal behavior.
The main feature of this work is that it explores criminal behavior from all aspects of Tinbergen's Four Questions. Rather than focusing on a single theoretical point of view, this book examines the neurobiology of crime from a biosocial perspective. It suggests that it is necessary to understand some genetics and neuroscience in order to appreciate and apply relevant concepts to criminological issues. Presenting up-to-date information on the circuitry of the brain, the authors explore and examine a variety of characteristics, traits and behavioral syndromes related to criminal behavior such as ADHD, intelligence, gender, the age-crime curve, schizophrenia, psychopathy, violence and substance abuse. This book brings together the sociological tradition with the latest knowledge the neurosciences have to offer and conveys biological information in an accessible and understanding way. It will be of interest to scholars in the field and to professional criminologists.
In recent years, the idea of emergence, which suggests that observed patterns in behavior and events are not fully reductive and stem from complex lower-level interactions, has begun to take hold in the social sciences. Criminologists have started to use this framework to improve our general understanding of the etiology of crime and criminal behavior. When Crime Appears: The Role of Emergence is concerned with our ability to make sense of the complex underpinnings of the end-stage patterns and events that we see in studying crime and offers an early narrative on the concept of emergence as it pertains to criminological research. Collectively, the chapters in this volume provide a sense of why the emergence framework could be useful, outlines its core conceptual properties, provides some examples of its potential application, and presents some discussion of methodological and analytic issues related to its adoption.
Ideal for allied health and pre-nursing students, Alcamos Fundamentals of Microbiology, Body Systems Edition, retains the engaging, student-friendly style and active learning approach for which award-winning author and educator Jeffrey Pommerville is known. It presents diseases, complete with new content on recent discoveries, in a manner that is directly applicable to students and organized by body system. A captivating art program, learning design format, and numerous case studies draw students into the text and make them eager to learn more about the fascinating world of microbiology.
In 1894, eighteen-year-old Jack London quit his job shoveling coal, hopped a freight train, and left California on the first leg of a ten thousand-mile odyssey. His adventure was an exaggerated version of the unemployed migrations made by millions of boys, men, and a few women during the original “great depression” of the 1890s. By taking to the road, young wayfarers like London forged a vast hobo subculture that was both a product of the new urban industrial order and a challenge to it. As London’s experience suggests, this hobo world was born of equal parts desperation and fascination. “I went on ‘The Road,’” he writes, “because I couldn't keep away from it . . . because I was so made that I couldn’t work all my life on ‘one same shift’; because—well, just because it was easier to than not to.” The best stories that London wrote about his hoboing days can be found in The Road, a collection of nine essays with accompanying illustrations, most of which originally appeared in Cosmopolitan magazine between 1907 and 1908. His virile persona spoke to white middle-class readers who vicariously escaped their desk-bound lives and followed London down the hobo trail. The zest and humor of his tales, as Todd DePastino explains in his lucid introduction, often obscure their depth and complexity. The Road is as much a commentary on London’s disillusionment with wealth, celebrity, and the literary marketplace as it is a picaresque memoir of his youth.
The first book to examine identity theft from the offender's perspective
This volume provides the first comprehensive overview of social psychological research on inequality for a graduate student and professional audience. Drawing on all of the major theoretical traditions in sociological social psychology, its chapters demonstrate the relevance of social psychological processes to this central sociological concern. Each chapter in the volume has a distinct substantive focus, but the chapters will also share common emphases on: • The unique contributions of sociological social psychology • The historical roots of social psychological concepts and theories in classic sociological writings • The complementary and conflicting insights that derive from different social psychological traditions in sociology. This Handbook is of interest to graduate students preparing for careers in social psychology or in inequality, professional sociologists and university/college libraries.
In Violence Against Women, award-winning author Walter S. DeKeseredy offers a passionate but well-documented sociological overview of a sobering problem. He starts by outlining the scope of the challenge and debunks current attempts to label intimate violence as gender neutral. He then lays bare the structural practices that sustain this violence, leading to a discussion of long- and short-term policies to address the issue. DeKeseredy includes an examination of male complicity and demonstrates how boys and men can change their roles. Throughout, he responds to myths that dismiss threats to women's health and safety and provides an impassioned call to action for women, men, and policymakers.
This new book from noted criminologists Charis Kubrin, Thomas Stucky and Marvin Krohn is a unique supplement for criminological theory courses, graduate level research methods courses, or seminars that take a close look at the development of criminological theory and/or methods. This book is intended to bridge the gap between theory and research in the study of crime and deviant behavior. There are a number of textbooks that provide excellent summaries of criminological theories. Many ofthese include critiques of the theories discussing the empirical evidence that has been rendered in support (or not) of those theories. However, empirical evidence is only as good as the research methods that were used to generate it. Theory texts do not critically evaluate the research methods that generate the findings they cite. The student, therefore, obtains an impression of the utility of the theory based on an uncritical assessment of the research evidence. The purpose of this book is to explicitly assess the research methods that have been used to test nine theoretical perspectives of crime. Specifically, the authors focus on sampling, measurement, and analytical issues in doing theoretically directed research.
Designed to bring criminology into the 21st century by showing how leading criminologists have integrated aspects of the biological sciences into their discipline. This book covers behavior and molecular genetics, epigenetics, evolutionary biology, and neuroscience, and apply them to various correlates of crime such as age, race, and gender.
Criminological Theory: A Brief Introduction, Third Edition, offers an accessible discussion of the major theories of crime, delinquency, social deviance, and social control with an objective and neutral approach. The text provides students with an understanding of not only what the central tenets are of criminological theories but also focuses on providing real-life examples and implications for criminal justice policy and practice.
This textbook analyzes the causes, dynamics, and nature of male crime and aggression. Written for both undergraduate and graduate level students, this textbook takes a multidisciplinary approach to male criminality. The study of crime and criminals has typically either focused specifically on female deviance or has offered a general analysis of crime that presumes, by and large, a male offender. This textbook explicitly analyzes male criminality, rather than implicitly studying it through a general analysis of crime. The relationship between male aggression and masculinity is explored, as is the role of testosterone and other biological factors that may play a role in male crime and violence. The textbook is divided into seven parts. Part 1 examines the biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural and masculinity theories that attempt to explain male aggression, crime, and violence. Part 2 concentrates on the dynamics of male crime and violence. Gender differences in criminal behavior are examined, as well as racial and ethnic differences in male crime. The arrest patterns and the characteristics of male inmates in adult and juvenile correctional facilities are also explored. Part 3 focuses on male crime of violence; chapters are devoted to examinations of homicide, forcible rape, domestic violence, stalking, hate crimes, workplace violence, and terrorism. Part 4 explores property offenses, such as robbery, motor vehicle theft, and carjacking. Part 5 examines male sex offenses and includes analyses of incest, child sexual abuse, prostitution-related crimes, and explores the relationship between pornography and male violence. Part 6 looks at juvenile male crime and delinquency, with a focus on youth gangs and school crime and violence. Part 7 outlines Federal legislation designed to combat criminal and violent behavior, including the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, the Violence Against Women Act of 2000, and the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, amended in 1978. The textbook is appropriate for coursework in criminal justice, criminology, sociology, psychology, law enforcement, and other related areas of study.
Understanding worldwide gangs through the lens of globalization
Hinduja examines the social, psychological, criminological, and behavioral aspects of Internet crime. Guided by the most prominent general theories of criminal behavior, he explores music piracy - an all too-common form of cybercrime - by attempting to answer a number of questions. Does stress and strain play a role? What about low self-control? Is music piracy learned within intimate social groups? Do rationalizations and justifications contribute to participation? Is the behavior strengthened or weakened through rewards and punishments? Hinduja then discusses his findings in detail, with the intention of framing ideas into feasible practices that can accommodate the benefits of the new digital economy, the music industry, and the perpetually growing wired world.

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