Complete EU Law combines extracts from leading cases and articles with expert author commentary in a concise and student-friendly format. The broad range of key topics taught on EU law modules are thoroughly covered, including full chapters on human rights and competition law. The Complete titles are ambitious in their scope; they've been carefully developed with teachers to offer law students more than just a presentation of the key concepts. Instead they offer a complete package. Only by building on the foundations of the subject, by showing how the law works, demonstrating its application through extracts from cases and judgments, and by giving students the tools and the confidence to think critically about the law will they gain a complete understanding. This text is also supported by an Online Resource Centre which includes: * An interactive timeline and map illustrating the development of the EU and providing essential background knowledge of the Union and its Member States * Video clips from the European Commission showing key moments in EU legal history * Updates from the authors allowing students to stay on top of key developments in EU law * Self-test questions with instant feedback to help check understanding and assist with revision * Outline answers to assessment questions to help develop essay and problem-solving skills ahead of exams
If you're serious about exam success, it's time to Concentrate! EU Law Concentrate is the essential study and revision guide for law students looking for extra marks. The clear, succinct coverage enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and helps you to succeed in exams. This guide has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. Online Resource Centre:Packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam QandAs, and more, EU Law Concentrate is also supported by extensive online resources to take your learning further (www.oup.com/lawrevision/): * Pinpoint which areas you need to concentrate on with the diagnostic test* Test your knowledge with the multiple choice questions and receive feedback on your answers* Improve your essay skills using the outline answers and annotated answers for guidance on what to include and how to structure your answer* Revise the facts and principles of key cases using the interactive flashcards* Learn the important terms and definitions using the interactive glossary* Check that you have covered the main points of a topic using the key facts lists* Explore the subject in more depth with extensive further reading recommendations* Achieve better marks following the advice on revision and exam technique by experienced examiner Nigel Foster
If you're serious about exam success, it's time to Concentrate! EU Law Concentrate is the essential study and revision guide for law students looking to consolidate knowledge and achieve the best possible marks in their exams. Providing clear, succinct coverage of the essential topics, it enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and excel in exams. Each guide in the Concentrate series has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for its high level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. Packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, practice exam questions, and more, EU Law Concentrate is also supported by a wide range of online resources to further your learning Online Resource Centre (http://www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/concentrate) DT Plan your revision using the printable topic overviews DT Target the areas you need to concentrate on with the diagnostic test and key facts checklist DT Test your knowledge of EU law with multiple choice questions and receive feedback on your answers DT Improve your essay-writing skills using the outline answers and expert guidance DT Revise the key facts and cases of the subject using the interactive flashcards DT Learn the important terms and definitions using the interactive glossary DT Explore the subject in more depth with extensive further reading recommendations DT Achieve better marks with the aid of experienced advice on revision and exam technique
If you're serious about exam success, it's time to Concentrate! EU Law Concentrate is the essential study and revision guide for law students looking for extra marks. The clear, succinct coverage enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and helps you to succeed in exams. This guide has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. Online Resources Packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more, EU Law Concentrate is also supported by extensive online resources to take your learning further (www.oup.com/lawrevision/): - Pinpoint which areas you need to concentrate on with the diagnostic test - Test your knowledge with the multiple choice questions and receive feedback on your answers - Improve your essay skills using the outline answers and annotated answers for guidance on what to include and how to structure your answer - Revise the facts and principles of key cases using the interactive flashcards - Learn the important terms and definitions using the interactive glossary - Explore the subject in more depth with extensive further reading recommendations - Achieve better marks following the advice on revision and exam technique by experienced examiner Nigel Foster
Complete Land Law is supported by clear author commentary, choice extracts, and useful learning features. The explanations and examples in this textbook have been crafted to help students hone their understanding of land law. The Complete titles are ambitious in their scope; they've been carefully developed with teachers to offer law students more than just a presentation of the key concepts. Instead they offer a complete package. Only by building on the foundations of the subject, by showing how the law works, demonstrating its application through extracts from cases and judgments, and by giving students the tools and the confidence to think critically about the law will they gain a complete understanding. This book is accompanied by a free to access Online Resource Centre which features resources for students and lecturers. For students - Guidence for answering end-of-chapter questions in the book - Self-test question with instant feedback - A flashcard glossary of key terms - Web links to useful websites For lecturers - Customizable PowerPoint slides containing the diagrams from the book for use in lectures and seminars
In the domain of public policy on pharmaceuticals, protecting public health requires a dual strategy: robust regulation on the one hand and stimulation of competitiveness and innovation on the other. Regulation must be robust to ensure that only medicines meeting exact standards of safety, quality and efficacy are authorised for human and animal use. At the same time, competitiveness and innovation must be stimulated. Without innovation in pharmaceuticals, the incurable diseases of today will remain incurable. Competitiveness drives innovation and innovation saves lives. Increased competitiveness of the pharmaceutical sector will not only better protect public health, but will also create high quality jobs and create growth. In this context the implementation of the G10 recommendations, particularly regarding the pricing and reimbursement of medicines by Member States, remains a considerable challenge. In order to make potentially life-saving pharmaceuticals available as soon as possible to patients and to enable industry to quickly recoup its investments and to reinvest into future R&D, still existing delays in some Member States between marketing authorization and the selling of the medicine have to be minimized. The proposed paediatric regulation, currently under discussion in Council and Parliament, is another example where a better protection of (childrens) health goes together with a stimulation of competitiveness and innovation in the European pharmaceutical industry. This publication focuses on the recent review of the EU pharmaceutical legislation. The revised legislation is a key part of the above-mentioned dual strategy.
Complete Land Law provides a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to the subject, combining extracts from key cases and legislation with clear author explanations and commentary. Diagrams, summaries and questions further support the text, making it the ideal guide for students new to the subject.
Examining the principle of mutual recognition in the EU legal order, this book takes a cross-policy approach to focus on the principle in the internal market and in the criminal justice area. It asks whether the principle of mutual recognition, as developed in relation to the free movement provisions (internal market), can equally be applied in judicial cooperation in criminal matters (the area of freedom, security, and justice), and if such a cross-policy application is desirable. Divided into three parts, the book first looks at the way this principle functions in the internal market. Part II examines how the principle works in judicial cooperation in criminal matters, with the final part answering the book's central questions. In each part, further related questions are asked: What is the object of the principle of mutual recognition? Who are the main actors involved? How does the mechanism of mutual recognition operate (with an emphasis on the existing limits to mutual recognition)? How does mutual recognition relate to harmonization and to mutual trust? What is the relevance of equivalence requirements and the distribution of competence between the home (issuing) State and the host (executing) State? What are the main characteristics of the principle of mutual recognition? And is it a workable principle? Through an in-depth analysis of the relevant Treaty provisions, EU legislation, EU case law, and EU policy documents, the book comes to the conclusion that a cross-policy application of the principle of mutual recognition is both feasible and desirable.
Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is a regulatory requirement for development across Europe, North America, Australasia and elsewhere, yet understanding the legal aspects is challenging. This comprehensive guide provides that understanding in a clear and straightforward way.The introduction considers SEA and the law, explaining what SEA is, why it is needed, how it works and why it is required, as well as examining the role of the law. Part One provides an overview of international law, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and international law, including treaties, customary international law and 'soft law' relevant to SEA. It analyses the Kiev SEA Protocol and related UNECE conventions, the Espoo Convention on EIA in a Transboundary Context and the Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters. It also analyses the role of SEA in conservation conventions.Part Two considers how the European legal system works, including an overview of the current status of European law. It examines the EIA Directive and SEA Directive together with other relevant directives and regulations, such as the Habitats and Wild Birds Directives, the Water Framework Directive, the Public Participation for Plans and Programmes Directive, and the Structural Funds Regulations. Finally the volume draws conclusions about the relationship and comparisons between international and European law generally, and in regulating SEA.
Many legal experts no longer share an unbounded trust in the potential of law to govern society efficiently and responsibly. They often experience the 'limits of the law', as they are confronted with striking inadequacies in their legal toolbox, with inner inconsistencies of the law, with problems of enforcement and obedience, and with undesired side-effects, and so on. The contributors to this book engage in the challenging task of making sense of this experience. Against the background of broader cultural transformations (such as globalisation, new technologies, individualism and cultural diversity), they revisit a wide range of areas of the law and map different types of limits in relation to some basic functions and characteristics of the law. Additionally, they offer a set of strategies to manage justifiably law's limits, such as dedramatising law's limits, conceptual refinement ('constructivism'), striking the right balance between different functions of the law, seeking for complementarity between law and other social practices.
This invaluable guide provides a succinct, up-to-the-minute view of European and international affairs. It presents a vast range of information in a highly accessible, jargon-free question-and-answer format, giving all the salient facts on:
The European Commission white paper on sport, published on 11 July 2007, was referred to the Culture, Media and Sport Committee for an opinion by the European Scrutiny Committee. The white paper consists of three policy discussions, on the social value of sport, the economic value of sport, and the organisation of sport. Various action points emerge from the discussions, and with the white paper these form the Action Plan Pierre de Coubertin (included as an appendix to this report). There is a lack of competence for sport under existing EU treaties, though not under the Reform, or Lisbon, treaty. The report examines the content of the white paper and sport and EU law in detail. The Committee believes that sport has distinctive characteristics that need to be taken into account in the application of EU law. Much of the white paper is useful in exploring scope for using existing networks and programmes to support participation in sport. But the Committee does not believe there is any justification or necessity for the Commission to take a more active role in driving the development of policy on sport, and notes the alarm created by the lack of a clear statement on the autonomy of sports organisations. Governing bodies of sport should have the freedom to decide for themselves how their sport is run.
This is the second edition of this wide-ranging survey of EU law. The new edition has been significantly enlarged. Unlike many other EU law books it takes full account not only of the Lisbon Treaty changes to the EU treaties, but also of the fact that the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights now has the same legal value as the EU Treaties. It therefore not only covers the relevant case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union, but also ties that case law into the decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, because it is clear that EU law can only now properly be understood and applied against this background of European fundamental rights jurisprudence. The book sets out very clearly the broad shape of the European Union's legal systems, while also giving the reader a good feel for the policy motivations in the Court of Justice of the European Union and the scope of EU legislative activity. Written in a lively and accessible style, it is an ideal guide for practitioners, whether those coming to the subject for the first time or those already with a background in EU law. Among the additions and changes in this expanded edition the book includes new chapters on the EU and fundamental rights, on commercial agency, on criminal law and on private international law in the EU. It also contains a full treatment of EU equality law. The first edition 'EC Law for UK Lawyers' by Aidan O'Neill and Jason Coppel (ISBN: 9780406024596) was published by Butterworths in 1994.
'Craig & de Burca has become a byword for quality: legally accurate and contextually rich' Christopher Hilson, Professor of Law, University of Reading Building on its unrivalled reputation as the definitive EU law textbook, this sixth edition continues to provide clear and insightful analysis of all aspects of European Union law. Drawing on their wealth of experience both teaching and writing in this area, Paul Craig and Grainne de Burca provide a comprehensive and enhanced account of their classic text. Working closely as an author team for over twenty years, they succeed in bringing together a unique mix of illuminating commentary and well-chosen extracts from a wide range of cases, legislation and academic articles. All chapters have been carefully structured and designed to enhance student learning at all levels, laying the foundations of the subject while building analysis of more complex areas and cutting edge debates. Each chapter opens with a concise overview of the 'central issues', providing valuable context, before drawing together key analysis in a comprehensive chapter conclusion to provide a clear yet complete picture of the subject. The book is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre which includes the following resources: - An interactive map of the EU, providing key facts about each member state - An interactive timeline, tracing key dates in the development of the EU - Author video discussing the importance of studying EU law - Updates to the law post-publication
This book examines the principal trends and policy goals relating to collective redress mechanisms in Europe. It identifies three principal areas in which procedures and debates have emerged: within consumer protection and competition law, and from some national court systems. It identifies differing national models of public and private enforcement in consumer protection law in the Member States, and the search for more efficient and inclusive procedures that would deliver increased access to justice and enhanced compliance with desired standards (arguably through deterrence). A sequence of case studies illustrates the pros and cons of differing models. Lessons are also drawn from the experience of class actions in the USA over the transactional costs of private law mechanisms, and adverse economic consequences. The various policy strands are unravelled and prioritised, and options for the future are recommended. The American 'private enforcement' model is contrasted with the more prevalent European public and mediated enforcement tradition. New developments involving Ombudsmen and oversight of compensation by public enforcement bodies are identified, and underlying theories of restorative justice and responsive regulation discussed. Public, private, formal, informal, ADR and voluntary methodologies are evaluated against criteria, and it is concluded that the optimal options for collective redress in Europe involve a combination of approaches, with priority given to public and voluntary solutions over private court-based mechanisms. "Reform of collective redress is the hottest topic in European civil justice today. Dr. Hodges, one of the world's leading experts in the field, provides a deeply informed evaluation of the current debates. Illustrative case studies drawn from both consumer protection and competition areas enrich and ground his provocative analysis of the complex issues at stake making this a "must-have" book for every practitioner, academic and policy-maker in the field". Professor Jane Stapleton, Australian National University, and University of Texas, Austin.
The assumption that Member States of the European Union enjoyed exclusive competence over social provision has been shaken by the realisation that they are now "semi-sovereign welfare states†? whose policy choices are subject to increasing scrutiny under Community law. This book seeks to take stock of how Community membership is reshaping the legal environment of welfare provision across Europe. Topics covered include: the evolving economic and governance debates about Community intervention in social rights; the relationship between public services and Community competition and state aids law; the crucial developments which have taken place in the sphere of health care; and recent judgments on free movement and equal treatment for Union citizens as regards national education and social assistance policies. Social Welfare and EU Law provides a valuable collection of essays overall exploring the emergence of new models of social solidarity within the European Union.
While scholarly writing has dealt with the role of law in the process of European integration, so far it has shed little light on the lawyers and communities of lawyers involved in that process. Law has been one of the most thoroughly investigated aspects of the European integration process, and EU law has become a well-established academic discipline, with the emergence more recently of an impressive body of legal and political science literature on 'European law in context'. Yet this field has been dominated by an essentially judicial narrative, focused on the role of the European courts, underestimating in the process the multifaceted roles lawyers and law play in the EU polity, notably the roles they play beyond the litigation arena. This volume seeks to promote a deeper understanding of European law as a social and political phenomenon, presenting a more complete view of the European legal field by looking beyond the courts, and at the same time broadening the scholarly horizon by exploring the ways in which European law is actually made. To do this it describes the roles of the great variety of actors who stand behind legal norms and decisions, bringing together perspectives from various disciplines (law, political science, political sociology and history), to offer a global multi-disciplinary reassessment of the role of 'law' and 'lawyers' in the European integration process.
The Cambridge Yearbook of European Legal Studies provides a forum for the scrutiny of significant issues in EU Law, the law of the European Convention on Human Rights, and Comparative Law with a 'European' dimension, and particularly those issues which have come to the fore during the year preceding publication. The contributions appearing in the collection are commissioned by the Centre for European Legal Studies (CELS) Cambridge, a research centre in the Law Faculty of the University of Cambridge specialising in European legal issues. The papers presented are at the cutting edge of the fields which they address, and reflect the views of recognised experts drawn from the University world, legal practice, and the institutions of both the EU and its Member States. Inclusion of the comparative dimension brings a fresh perspective to the study of European law, and highlights the effects of globalisation of the law more generally, and the resulting cross fertilisation of norms and ideas that has occurred among previously sovereign and separate legal orders. The Cambridge Yearbook of European Legal Studies is an invaluable resource for those wishing to keep pace with legal developments in the fast moving world of European integration. INDIVIDUAL CHAPTERS Please click on the link below to purchase individual chapters from Volume 14 through Ingenta Connect: www.ingentaconnect.com SUBSCRIPTION TO SERIES To place an annual online subscription or a print standing order through Hart Publishing please click on the link below. Please note that any customers who have a standing order for the printed volumes will now be entitled to free online access. www.hartjournals.co.uk/cyels/subs Editorial Advisory Board: Albertina Albors-Llorens, John Bell, Alan Dashwood, Simon Deakin, David Feldman, Richard Fentiman, Angus Johnston, John Spencer Founding Editors: Alan Dashwood and Angela Ward

Best Books