Complete EU Law combines extracts from leading cases and articles with expert author commentary in a concise and student-friendly format. The broad range of key topics taught on EU law modules are thoroughly covered, including full chapters on human rights and competition law. The Complete titles are ambitious in their scope; they've been carefully developed with teachers to offer law students more than just a presentation of the key concepts. Instead they offer a complete package. Only by building on the foundations of the subject, by showing how the law works, demonstrating its application through extracts from cases and judgments, and by giving students the tools and the confidence to think critically about the law will they gain a complete understanding. This text is also supported by an Online Resource Centre which includes: * An interactive timeline and map illustrating the development of the EU and providing essential background knowledge of the Union and its Member States * Video clips from the European Commission showing key moments in EU legal history * Updates from the authors allowing students to stay on top of key developments in EU law * Self-test questions with instant feedback to help check understanding and assist with revision * Outline answers to assessment questions to help develop essay and problem-solving skills ahead of exams
If you're serious about exam success, it's time to Concentrate! EU Law Concentrate is the essential study and revision guide for law students looking for extra marks. The clear, succinct coverage enables you to quickly grasp the fundamental principles of this area of law and helps you to succeed in exams. This guide has been rigorously reviewed and is endorsed by students and lecturers for level of coverage, accuracy, and exam advice. Online Resources Packed with essential information, key cases, revision tips, exam Q&As, and more, EU Law Concentrate is also supported by extensive online resources to take your learning further (www.oup.com/lawrevision/): - Pinpoint which areas you need to concentrate on with the diagnostic test - Test your knowledge with the multiple choice questions and receive feedback on your answers - Improve your essay skills using the outline answers and annotated answers for guidance on what to include and how to structure your answer - Revise the facts and principles of key cases using the interactive flashcards - Learn the important terms and definitions using the interactive glossary - Explore the subject in more depth with extensive further reading recommendations - Achieve better marks following the advice on revision and exam technique by experienced examiner Nigel Foster
Complete Land Law is supported by clear author commentary, choice extracts, and useful learning features. The explanations and examples in this textbook have been crafted to help students hone their understanding of land law. The Complete titles are ambitious in their scope; they've been carefully developed with teachers to offer law students more than just a presentation of the key concepts. Instead they offer a complete package. Only by building on the foundations of the subject, by showing how the law works, demonstrating its application through extracts from cases and judgments, and by giving students the tools and the confidence to think critically about the law will they gain a complete understanding. This book is accompanied by a free to access Online Resource Centre which features resources for students and lecturers. For students - Guidence for answering end-of-chapter questions in the book - Self-test question with instant feedback - A flashcard glossary of key terms - Web links to useful websites For lecturers - Customizable PowerPoint slides containing the diagrams from the book for use in lectures and seminars
This work deals with European Community law and is intended for the use of those whose experience covers the range from tertiary college stage through to postgraduate and professional levels.
Examining the principle of mutual recognition in the EU legal order, this book takes a cross-policy approach to focus on the principle in the internal market and in the criminal justice area. It asks whether the principle of mutual recognition, as developed in relation to the free movement provisions (internal market), can equally be applied in judicial cooperation in criminal matters (the area of freedom, security, and justice), and if such a cross-policy application is desirable. Divided into three parts, the book first looks at the way this principle functions in the internal market. Part II examines how the principle works in judicial cooperation in criminal matters, with the final part answering the book's central questions. In each part, further related questions are asked: What is the object of the principle of mutual recognition? Who are the main actors involved? How does the mechanism of mutual recognition operate (with an emphasis on the existing limits to mutual recognition)? How does mutual recognition relate to harmonization and to mutual trust? What is the relevance of equivalence requirements and the distribution of competence between the home (issuing) State and the host (executing) State? What are the main characteristics of the principle of mutual recognition? And is it a workable principle? Through an in-depth analysis of the relevant Treaty provisions, EU legislation, EU case law, and EU policy documents, the book comes to the conclusion that a cross-policy application of the principle of mutual recognition is both feasible and desirable.
This new edition of EU Employment Law provides a complete revision and update of the leading English language text in the field. The coverage in the new edition has been expanded with material on all the latest developments, incorporating the changes made by the Lisbon Treaty; the EU2020 strategy; the Charter of Fundamental Rights; the 'Article 19 Directives'; the Temporary Agency Work Directive; the revisions to the existing including the Directives on Parental Leave and European Works Council; and the new Social Security Regulations 883/2004. It also analyses the ever-expanding body of employment case law, including the momentous decisions in Viking, Laval, Rueffert, and Commission v Luxembourg. The book begins with an examination of the development of EU employment law focusing on the shift from employment law to employment policy. The text then studies rule-making in the field of employment law, considering both the traditional routes to legislation and governance techniques such as the Open Method of Coordination. The final chapters look closely at the substantive area of employment law, examining the free movement of persons, equal treatment, health and safety and working conditions, the restructuring of enterprises, worker participation, and collective action. Throughout, the book addresses the fundamental question as to the purpose of EU employment law: is it primarily economic, or social, or both?
The Directions series has been written with students in mind. The ideal guide as they approach the subject for the first time, this book will help them: DT Gain a complete understanding of the topic: just the right amount of detail conveyed clearly DT Understand the law in context: with scene-setting introductions and highlighted case extracts, the practical importance of the law becomes clear DT Identify when and how to critically evaluate the law: they'll be introduced to the key areas of debate and given the confidence to question the law DT Deepen and test knowledge: visually engaging learning and self-testing features aid understanding and help students tackle assessments with confidence DT Elevate their learning: with the ground-work in place your students can aspire to take their learning to the next level, with direction provided on how to go further Online resources This text is also accompanied by free online resources which includes the following features: - Regular updates on the progression of Brexit in terms of EU law - Self-test questions with instant feedback - Video clips from the European Commission - Suggested approaches to end of chapter questions - Study and exam tips - Useful weblinks - An interactive timeline showing the key moments in EU legal history - An interactive map illustrating the development of the EU and providing essential background knowledge
This eagerly awaited new edition has been significantly revised after extensive user feedback to meet current teaching requirements. The first major textbook to be published since the rejuvenation of the Lisbon Treaty, it retains the best elements of the first edition – the engaging, easily understandable writing style, extracts from a variety of sources showing the creation, interpretation and application of the law and comprehensive coverage. In addition it has separate chapters on EU law in national courts, governance and external relations reflecting the new directions in which the field is moving. The examination of the free movement of goods and competition law has been restructured. Chapter introductions clearly set out what will be covered in each section allowing students to approach complex material with confidence and detailed further reading sections encourage further study. Put simply, it is required reading for all serious students of EU law.
This book considers the case for modernising partnership rights in EC family reunification law. Existing Community law traditionally guarantees immigration rights only to spouses and yet there is a growing diversity of national laws on same-sex marriage, registered partnerships and recognition of cohabitation. The Community institutions which have recently framed new legislation seem to view this as a question that can be settled by political agreement with little or no outside constraint. The book challenges this assumption. The book outlines recent developments in national legal systems and traces the development of the recent Community legislation. Then, drawing on basic ECHR principles, the place of the ECHR in Community law, and on basic Community law principles of free movement and discrimination the book argues that the right of a migrant EU Citizen to family reunification for a cohabiting partner is presumptively protected and therefore justification for refusing to admit such partners must be provided. It also considers the possible justifications for marriage-partners only immigration policies and concludes that although possible, such justifications are far from certain to succeed. The discussion also tackles the question of whether judicial activism is appropriate or whether there should be judicial deference to the legislative process recently completed. The book concludes with a wider discussion of the proper response of Community law to the increasing diversity of Member States family laws and policies beyond the field of immigration rights.
This unique book is not an introduction to European Law. It provides an understanding of methodology, objectives and principles of EU law. It tries to explain its legal peculiarities, particularly with regard to the concept of internal market. It takes as starting point its liberal roots enshrined in the free movement, competition and autonomy provisions, but focuses equally on the development of countervailing principles about citizenship, adequate standards, and governance. It refers selectively to important secondary law, in particular directives, and to leading cases of the European Court of Justice. It is directed at all law scholars, students, practitioners, political scientists, in the old and new Member countries of the EU as well as third countries who want to understand what EU law is all about. It will allow the reader a first orientation, without suffocating him or her in too much detail.
This book revisits, in a new light, some of the classic cases which constitute the foundations of the EU legal order and is timed to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Rome Treaty establishing a European Economic Community. Its broader purpose, however, is to discuss the future of the EU legal order by examining, from a variety of different perspectives, the most important judgments of the ECJ which established the foundations of the EU legal order. The tone is neither necessarily celebratory nor critical, but relies on the viewpoint of the distinguished line-up of contributors - drawn from among former and current members of the Court (the view from within), scholars from other disciplines or lawyers from other legal orders (the view from outside), and two different generations of EU legal scholars (the classics revisit the classics and a view from the future). Each of these groups will provide a different perspective on the same set of selected judgments. In each short essay, questions such as 'what would have EU law been without this judgment of the Court? what factors might have influenced it?; did the judgment create expectations which were not fully fulfilled?' and so on, are posed and answered. The result is a profound, wide-ranging and fresh examination of the 'founding cases' of EU law.
The assumption that Member States of the European Union enjoyed exclusive competence over social provision has been shaken by the realisation that they are now "semi-sovereign welfare states†? whose policy choices are subject to increasing scrutiny under Community law. This book seeks to take stock of how Community membership is reshaping the legal environment of welfare provision across Europe. Topics covered include: the evolving economic and governance debates about Community intervention in social rights; the relationship between public services and Community competition and state aids law; the crucial developments which have taken place in the sphere of health care; and recent judgments on free movement and equal treatment for Union citizens as regards national education and social assistance policies. Social Welfare and EU Law provides a valuable collection of essays overall exploring the emergence of new models of social solidarity within the European Union.
Judicial review constitutes an important aspect of any legal system operating under the rule of law. This book provides a comprehensive account of judicial review in EU law by assessing the vast and complex case-law of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in this area and the academic opinion which has accompanied its rulings over the years. It questions the prevalent view in academic literature that the Court s restrictive approach to allowing individuals direct access to the Community Courts, in case of a challenge against normative acts, amounts to a denial of an effective remedy. The author argues that the emerging constitutional nature of the European Union and its federal structure requires a more balanced view. While it will improve direct access for individuals to the Union's judiciary, the Lisbon Treaty will not radically alter the system of judicial review in the European Union. Judicial Review in EU Law will be of great interest to academics, and given its detailed discussion of case-law of the ECJ it will also appeal to postgraduate students of European law. Dealing with an important aspect of legal practice, it will be invaluable reading for practitioners in law firms and officials working in local, regional and central government.
Routledge Q&As give you the tools to practice and refine your exam technique, showing you how to apply your knowledge to maximum effect in an exam situation. Each book contains up to fifty essay and problem-based questions on the most commonly examined topics, complete with expert guidance and fully worked model answers. These new editions for 2013-2014 will provide you with the skills you need for your exams by: Helping you to be prepared: each title in the series has an introduction presenting carefully tailored advice on how to approach assessment for your subject Showing you what examiners are looking for: each question is annotated with both a short overview on how to approach your answer, as well as footnoted commentary that demonstrate how model answers meet marking criteria Offering pointers on how to gain marks, as well as what common errors could lose them: ‘Aim Higher’ and ‘Common Pitfalls’ offer crucial guidance throughout Helping you to understand and remember the law: diagrams for each answer work to illuminate difficult legal principles and provide overviews of how model answers are structured Books in the series are also supported by a Companion Website that offers online essay-writing tutorials, podcasts, bonus Q&As and multiple-choice questions to help you focus your revision more effectively.
Many legal experts no longer share an unbounded trust in the potential of law to govern society efficiently and responsibly. They often experience the 'limits of the law', as they are confronted with striking inadequacies in their legal toolbox, with inner inconsistencies of the law, with problems of enforcement and obedience, and with undesired side-effects, and so on. The contributors to this book engage in the challenging task of making sense of this experience. Against the background of broader cultural transformations (such as globalisation, new technologies, individualism and cultural diversity), they revisit a wide range of areas of the law and map different types of limits in relation to some basic functions and characteristics of the law. Additionally, they offer a set of strategies to manage justifiably law's limits, such as dedramatising law's limits, conceptual refinement ('constructivism'), striking the right balance between different functions of the law, seeking for complementarity between law and other social practices.
In National Judges as EU law Judges: The Polish Civil Law System Urszula Jaremba examines the way civil judges in Poland function as decentralised EU judges. To this end, the author employs legal and empirical - that is to say quantitative and qualitative − methodology and theory.
The European Commission white paper on sport, published on 11 July 2007, was referred to the Culture, Media and Sport Committee for an opinion by the European Scrutiny Committee. The white paper consists of three policy discussions, on the social value of sport, the economic value of sport, and the organisation of sport. Various action points emerge from the discussions, and with the white paper these form the Action Plan Pierre de Coubertin (included as an appendix to this report). There is a lack of competence for sport under existing EU treaties, though not under the Reform, or Lisbon, treaty. The report examines the content of the white paper and sport and EU law in detail. The Committee believes that sport has distinctive characteristics that need to be taken into account in the application of EU law. Much of the white paper is useful in exploring scope for using existing networks and programmes to support participation in sport. But the Committee does not believe there is any justification or necessity for the Commission to take a more active role in driving the development of policy on sport, and notes the alarm created by the lack of a clear statement on the autonomy of sports organisations. Governing bodies of sport should have the freedom to decide for themselves how their sport is run.
European Union Law and Private International Law both attempt to resolve a conflict of laws. There is however a certain tension between the two disciplines. The present book proposes suggestions to enhance their mutual understanding.

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