The purpose of this book is to demonstrate that complex numbers and geometry can be blended together beautifully. This results in easy proofs and natural generalizations of many theorems in plane geometry, such as the Napoleon theorem, the Ptolemy-Euler theorem, the Simson theorem, and the Morley theorem. The book is self-contained - no background in complex numbers is assumed - and can be covered at a leisurely pace in a one-semester course. Many of the chapters can be read independently. Over 100 exercises are included. The book would be suitable as a text for a geometry course, or for a problem solving seminar, or as enrichment for the student who wants to know more.
Follows on from Sherlock Holmes in Babylon to take the history of mathematics through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
A reissue of Professor Coxeter's classic text on non-Euclidean geometry. It surveys real projective geometry, and elliptic geometry. After this the Euclidean and hyperbolic geometries are built up axiomatically as special cases. This is essential reading for anybody with an interest in geometry.
An Episodic History of Mathematics will acquaint students and readers with mathematical language, thought, and mathematical life by means of historically important mathematical vignettes. It will also serve to help prospective teachers become more familiar with important ideas of in the history of mathematicsboth classical and modern.Contained within are wonderful and engaging stories and anecdotes about Pythagoras and Galois and Cantor and Poincar, which let readers indulge themselves in whimsy, gossip, and learning. The mathematicians treated here were complex individuals who led colorful and fascinating lives, and did fascinating mathematics. They remain interesting to us as people and as scientists.This history of mathematics is also an opportunity to have some fun because the focus in this text is also on the practicalgetting involved with the mathematics and solving problems. This book is unabashedly mathematical. In the course of reading this book, the neophyte will become involved with mathematics by working on the same problems that, for instance, Zeno and Pythagoras and Descartes and Fermat and Riemann worked on.This is a book to be read, therefore, with pencil and paper in hand, and a calculator or computer close by. All will want to experiment; to try things; and become a part of the mathematical process.
Needhams neuartiger Zugang zur Funktionentheorie wurde von der angelsächsischen Fachpresse begeistert aufgenommen. Mit über 500 zum großen Teil perspektivischen Grafiken vermittelt er im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes eine Anschauung von der ansonsten oft als trocken empfundenen Funktionentheorie. Weitere Informationenen zu Buch und Autor finden Sie auf der Web-Site des Autors.
Leonhard Euler was one of the most prolific mathematicians that have ever lived. This book examines the huge scope of mathematical areas explored and developed by Euler, which includes number theory, combinatorics, geometry, complex variables and many more. The information known to Euler over 300 years ago is discussed, and many of his advances are reconstructed. Readers will be left in no doubt about the brilliance and pervasive influence of Euler's work.
The work of the Norwegian mathematician Sophus Lie extends ideas of symmetry and leads to many applications in mathematics and physics. Ordinarily, the study of the "objects" in Lie's theory (Lie groups and Lie algebras) requires extensive mathematical prerequisites beyond the reach of the typical undergraduate. By restricting to the special case of matrix Lie groups and relying on ideas from multivariable calculus and linear algebra, this lovely and important material becomes accessible even to college sophomores. Working with Lie's ideas fosters an appreciation of the unity of mathematics and the sometimes surprising ways in which mathematics provides a language to describe and understand the physical world.Lie Groups is an active learning text that can be used by students with a range of backgrounds and interests. The material is developed through 200 carefully chosen problems. This is the only book in the undergraduate curriculum to bring this material to students so early in their mathematical careers.
This is a challenging problem-solving book in Euclidean geometry, assuming nothing of the reader other than a good deal of courage. Topics covered included cyclic quadrilaterals, power of a point, homothety, triangle centers; along the way the reader will meet such classical gems as the nine-point circle, the Simson line, the symmedian and the mixtilinear incircle, as well as the theorems of Euler, Ceva, Menelaus, and Pascal. Another part is dedicated to the use of complex numbers and barycentric coordinates, granting the reader both a traditional and computational viewpoint of the material. The final part consists of some more advanced topics, such as inversion in the plane, the cross ratio and projective transformations, and the theory of the complete quadrilateral. The exposition is friendly and relaxed, and accompanied by over 300 beautifully drawn figures. The emphasis of this book is placed squarely on the problems. Each chapter contains carefully chosen worked examples, which explain not only the solutions to the problems but also describe in close detail how one would invent the solution to begin with. The text contains as selection of 300 practice problems of varying difficulty from contests around the world, with extensive hints and selected solutions. This book is especially suitable for students preparing for national or international mathematical olympiads, or for teachers looking for a text for an honor class.
This book contains key topics that form the foundations for high-school mathematics.
Algebra and Tiling is accessible to undergraduate mathematics majors, as most of the tools necessary to read the book are found in standard upper division algebra courses, but teachers, researchers, and professional mathematicians will find the book equally appealing. Beginners will find the exercises and the appendices especially useful. The unsolved problems will challenge both beginners and experts. The book could serve as the basis of an undergraduate or graduate seminar or a source of applications to enrich an algebra or geometry course.
This book is about beautiful mathematical concepts and creations. Mathematical ideas have an aesthetic appeal that can be appreciated by those who have the time and dedication to investigate. Mathematical topics are presented in the categories of words, images, formulas, theorems, proofs, solutions, and unsolved problems. Readers will investigate exciting mathematical topics ranging from complex numbers to arithmetic progressions, from Alcuin's sequence to the zeta function, and from hypercubes to infinity squared.Do you know that a lemniscate curve is the circular inversion of a hyperbola? That Sierpinski's triangle has fractal dimension 1.585….? That a regular septagon can be constructed with straightedge, compass, and an angle trisector? Do you know how to prove Lagrange's theorem that every positive integer is the sum of four squares? Can you find the first three digits of the millionth Fibonacci number? Discover the keys to these and many other mathematical problems. In each case, the mathematics is compelling, elegant, simple, and beautiful.Who should read this book? There is something new for any mathematically-minded person. High school and college students will find motivation for their mathematical studies. Professional mathematicians will find fresh examples of mathematical beauty to pass along to others. Within each chapter, the topics require progressively more prerequisite knowledge. An appendix gives background definitions and theorems, while another gives challenging exercises (with solutions).
Differential geometry has a long, wonderful history it has found relevance in areas ranging from machinery design of the classification of four-manifolds to the creation of theories of nature's fundamental forces to the study of DNA. This book studies the differential geometry of surfaces with the goal of helping students make the transition from the compartmentalized courses in a standard university curriculum to a type of mathematics that is a unified whole, it mixes geometry, calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, complex variables, the calculus of variations, and notions from the sciences. Differential geometry is not just for mathematics majors, it is also for students in engineering and the sciences. Into the mix of these ideas comes the opportunity to visualize concepts through the use of computer algebra systems such as Maple. The book emphasizes that this visualization goes hand-in-hand with the understanding of the mathematics behind the computer construction. Students will not only “see” geodesics on surfaces, but they will also see the effect that an abstract result such as the Clairaut relation can have on geodesics. Furthermore, the book shows how the equations of motion of particles constrained to surfaces are actually types of geodesics. Students will also see how particles move under constraints. The book is rich in results and exercises that form a continuous spectrum, from those that depend on calculation to proofs that are quite abstract.
A Portal Through Mathematics is a collection of puzzles and problems mostly on topics relating to secondary mathematics. The problems and topics are fresh and interesting and frequently surprising. One example: the puzzle that asks how much length must be added to a belt around the Earth's equator to raise it one foot has probably achieved old chestnut status. Ivanov, after explaining the surprising answer to this question, goes a step further and asks, if you grabbed that too long belt at some point and raised it as high as possible, how high would that be? The answer to that is more surprising than the classic puzzle's answer. The book is organized into 29 themes, each a topic from algebra, geometry or calculus and each launched from an opening puzzle or problem. There are excursions into number theory, solid geometry, physics and combinatorics. Always there is an emphasis on surprise and delight. And every theme begins at a level approachable with minimal background requirements. With well over 250 puzzles and problems, there is something here sure to appeal to everyone. A Portal Through Mathematics will be useful for prospective secondary teachers of mathematics and may be used (as a supplementary resource) in university courses in algebra, geometry, calculus, and discrete mathematics. It can also be used for professional development for teachers looking for inspiration. However, the intended audience is much broader. Every fan of mathematics will find enjoyment in it.
Matrix algebra has been called "the arithmetic of higher mathematics" [Be]. We think the basis for a better arithmetic has long been available, but its versatility has hardly been appreciated, and it has not yet been integrated into the mainstream of mathematics. We refer to the system commonly called 'Clifford Algebra', though we prefer the name 'Geometric Algebm' suggested by Clifford himself. Many distinct algebraic systems have been adapted or developed to express geometric relations and describe geometric structures. Especially notable are those algebras which have been used for this purpose in physics, in particular, the system of complex numbers, the quatemions, matrix algebra, vector, tensor and spinor algebras and the algebra of differential forms. Each of these geometric algebras has some significant advantage over the others in certain applications, so no one of them provides an adequate algebraic structure for all purposes of geometry and physics. At the same time, the algebras overlap considerably, so they provide several different mathematical representations for individual geometrical or physical ideas.
An ideal choice for a first course in complex analysis, this book can be used either as a classroom text or for independent study. Written in an informal style by a master expositor, the book distills more than half a century of experience with the subject into a lucid, engaging, yet rigorous account. The book reveals both the power of complex analysis as a tool for applications and the intrinsic beauty of the subject as a fundamental part of pure mathematics. Written at the level of courses commonly taught in American universities to seniors and beginning graduate students, the book is suitable for readers acquainted with advanced calculus or introductory real analysis. The treatment goes beyond the standard material of power series, Cauchy's theorem, residues, conformal mapping, and harmonic functions by including accessible discussions of many intriguing topics that are uncommon in a book at this level. Readers will encounter notions ranging from Landau's notation to overconvergent series to the Phragmén-Lindelöf theorem. The flexibility afforded by the supplementary topics and applications makes the book adaptable either to a short, one-term course or to a comprehensive, full-year course.The writing is user-friendly in many ways. Each topic is discussed in a typical, commonly encountered situation rather than in the most general, abstract setting. There are no numbered equations. Numerous exercises interspersed in the text encourage readers to test their understanding of new concepts and techniques as they are presented. Detailed solutions of the exercises, included at the back of the book, both serve as models for students and facilitate independent study. Supplementary exercises at the ends of sections, not solved in the book, provide an additional teaching tool.This second edition of Invitation to Complex Analysis has been painstakingly revised by the author's son, himself an award-winning mathematical expositor.
This book is arranged to show the development of the different branches of mathematics over time and contains many illustrations to support the text. In all, a short, innovative and easy-to-read history of mathematics.
Designed for precollege teachers by a collaborative of teachers, educators, and mathematicians, Applications of Algebra and Geometry to the Work of Teaching is based on a course offered in the Summer School Teacher Program at the Park City Mathematics Institute. But this book isn't a "course" in the traditional sense. It consists of a carefully sequenced collection of problem sets designed to develop several interconnected mathematical themes, and one of the goals of the problem sets is for readers to uncover these themes for themselves. The specific theme developed in Applications of Algebra and Geometry to the Work of Teaching is the use of complex numbers--especially the arithmetic of Gaussian and Eisenstein integers--to investigate some questions that are at the intersection of algebra and geometry, like the classification of Pythagorean triples and the number of representations of an integer as the sum of two squares. Applications of Algebra and Geometry to the Work of Teaching is a volume of the book series "IAS/PCMI-The Teacher Program Series" published by the American Mathematical Society. Each volume in that series covers the content of one Summer School Teacher Program year and is independent of the rest. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
Now available in paperback, this successful radical approach to complex analysis replaces the standard calculational arguments with new geometric ones. With several hundred diagrams, and far fewer prerequisites than usual, this is the first visual intuitive introduction to complex analysis. Although designed for use by undergraduates in mathematics and science, the novelty of the approach will also interest professional mathematicians.
Provide students with the tools to solve problems that are found on mathematical problem-solving exams.

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