After decades of focusing on the mother's role in parenting, family studies researchers have turned their attention to the role of the father in parenting and family development. The results shed new light on childhood development and question conventional wisdom by showing that beyond providing the more traditional economic support of the family, fathers do indeed matter when it comes to raising a child. Stemming from a series of workshops and publications sponsored by the Family and Child Well-Being Network, under the federal fatherhood initiative of the National Institute of Child Health and Development, this comprehensive volume focuses on ways of measuring the efficacy of father involvement in different scenarios, using different methods of assessment and different populations. In the process, new research strategies and new parental paradigms have been formulated to include paternal involvement. Moreover, this volume contains articles from a variety of influences while addressing the task of finding the missing pieces of the fatherhood construct that would work for new age, as well as traditional and minority fathers. The scope of this discussion offers topics of interest to basic researchers, as well as public policy analysts.
Sponsored by the National Council on Family Relations, the Sourcebook of Family Theory and Research is the reference work on theory and methods for family scholars and students around the world. This volume provides a diverse, eclectic, and paradoxically mature approach to theorizing and demonstrates how the development of theory is crucial to the future of family research. The Sourcebook reflects an interactive approach that focuses on the process of theory building and designing research, thereby engaging readers in "doing" theory rather than simply reading about it. An accompanying Web site, http://www.ncfr.org/sourcebook, offers additional participation and interaction in the process of doing theory and making science.
Family Factors and the Educational Success of Children addresses a wide range of family variables and a diverse array of family situations in order to understand the dynamics of the multifaceted relationship between family realities and educational outcomes of children. It provides research on building effective partnerships between parents and teaches the importance of parental style, parental involvement as a means of improving family life, the influence of family factors on children of color, and the role of religion in influencing family and educational dynamics. This book is a valuable resource for academics, family scientists, social workers, psychologists, parents, and students. The book contains research on a full variety of issues, which will provide insight into a wide range of practical matters regarding the influence of the family. The research methodology included in this book includes examining large data sets, case studies, research syntheses and other student surveys. As a result of reading this book, individuals will have greater insight into how a multitudinous number of family factors ultimately influence the educational success of children, whether that is experienced directly or indirectly. This book was published as a double special issue of Marriage and Family Review.
The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA), which became law in 1997, elicited a major shift in federal policy and thinking toward child welfare, emphasizing children's safety, permanency, and well-being over preserving biological ties at all costs. The first edition of this volume mapped the field of child welfare after ASFA's passage, detailing the practices, policies, programs, and research affected by the legislation's new attitude toward care. This second edition highlights the continuously changing child welfare climate in the U.S., including content on the Fostering Connections Act of 2008. The authors have updated the text throughout, drawing from real-world case examples and data obtained from the national Child and Family Services Reviews and emerging empirically based practices. They have also added chapters addressing child welfare workforce issues, supervision, and research and evaluation. The volume is divided into four sections—child and adolescent well-being, child and adolescent safety, permanency for children and adolescents, and systemic issues within services, policies, and programs. Recognized scholars, practitioners, and policy makers discuss meaningful engagement with families, particularly Latino families; health care for children and youth, including mental health care; effective practices with LGBT youth and their families; placement stability; foster parent recruitment and retention; and the challenges of working with immigrant children, youth, and families.
Common stereotypes portray black fathers as being largely absent from their families. Yet while black fathers are less likely than white and Hispanic fathers to marry their child's mother, many continue to parent through cohabitation and visitation, providing caretaking, financial, and other in-kind support. This volume captures the meaning and practice of black fatherhood in its many manifestations, exploring two-parent families, cohabitation, single custodial fathering, stepfathering, noncustodial visitation, and parenting by extended family members and friends. Contributors examine ways that black men perceive and decipher their parenting responsibilities, paying careful attention to psychosocial, economic, and political factors that affect the ability to parent. Chapters compare the diversity of African American fatherhood with negative portrayals in politics, academia, and literature and, through qualitative analysis and original profiles, illustrate the struggle and intent of many black fathers to be responsible caregivers. This collection also includes interviews with daughters of absent fathers and concludes with the effects of certain policy decisions on responsible parenting.
This book presents an international perspective on the involvement of men in the lives of young children across a range of differing contexts and from a number of disciplinary perspectives. It takes as a starting point the importance of positive male engagement with young children so as to ensure their optimal development. Past research has revealed however the complexity of studying these relationships and the barriers that exist in families & society which impede the implementation of positive relationships. This book is developed to use new research and educational thinking in order to explore the lived experiences of both fathers and men in edu-care and in addition to considers what it is to be a man in the 21st century. As such this work is pertinent, timely and responsive to issues of concern to all those professionals, policy makers and practitioners within education and family services and also to the public in general. The central purpose of the book is to contribute to the debate around key issues connected to the ways in which men can develop secure professional and familial attachments to young children for whom they have a responsibility. This book was published as a special issue of Early Child Development and Care.
The most long-lasting and enduring relationship an individual can develop is with a sibling. Considering the closeness in age and early association of siblings, they can bond for a lifetime. Psychologists are beginning to appreciate the sibling link and its dynamic role in a child's social development. Beyond the mother-child dyad, sibling associations are now attributed with determining cognitive faculties, emotional balance, self-sufficiency, and peer interactions. Clarifying the complex processes of these relationships and the benefit of parental involvement, Avidan Milevsky provides a foundational text for a growing area of study. Deploying personal narrative, theoretical examinations, and empirical data, he unravels the intricacies of the sibling exchange and their function in overall family structures. He identifies the factors that make such bonds successful (or harmful) and the influence of parents in shaping these outcomes. He also evaluates the compensatory possibilities of the sibling bond when faced with the absence of a parent or friend. Variables such as age, birth order, gender, and family size are tremendous considerations, and parents hoping to enhance the sibling bond gain immensely from understanding these predictors. Milevsky shows practitioners how to educate parents and help them apply their knowledge in practice. He particularly supplies crucial perspective on "deidentification," or conscious differentiation, in which parents encourage different life paths to minimize sibling comparison and competition. A major tool for clinicians, social service providers, and educators, this book clarifies the next frontier in child development research.
The essays in this collection deploy biological and social scientific perspectives to evaluate the transformative experience of parenthood for today's women and men. They map the similar and distinct roles mothers and fathers play in their children's lives and measure the effect of gendered parenting on child well-being, work and family arrangements, and the quality of couples' relationships. Contributors describe what happens to brains and bodies when women become mothers and men become fathers; whether the stakes are the same or different for each sex; why, across history and cultures, women are typically more involved in childcare than men; why some fathers are strongly present in their children's lives while others are not; and how the various commitments men and women make to parenting shape their approaches to paid work and romantic relationships. Considering recent changes in men's and women's familial duties, the growing number of single-parent families, and the impassioned tenor of same-sex marriage debates, this book adds sound scientific and theoretical insight to these issues, constituting a standout resource for those interested in the causes and consequences of contemporary gendered parenthood.
Over the last twenty years it has become recognized that fathers play a crucial role in child development and subsequent adult status and behaviour. This book presents the state-of-the-art on fathering and its determinants. Based on original research into the effects that different styles of fathering can have on children, it explores the long and short terms outcomes of involved fathering on different domains of children?s lives, including academic achievement, mental health, socio-economic status, adolescent relationships and delinquency.
This handsomely bound volume contains 23 articles by leading scholars addressing recent developments in the field of sociology. It opens with W. Richard Scott's (Stanford U.) reflections on the emergence of organizational sociology during the second half of the 20th century. Other topics include (for example) a review of Durkheim's Theory of Mental
This study examined how mothers and fathers reason about young children's autonomy and personal discretion. Since fathers' ideas about these issues remain unexplored, the goal of the present study was to assess both fathers and mothers conceptions of young children's areas of personal choice, as well as to analyze the effect of child's gender on those conceptions. Seventy-seven upper-middle class White American mothers (n=39) and fathers (n=38) of children ages 3-5, half girls and half boys, were individually interviewed regarding their judgments about a set of hypothetical scenarios depicting daily life conflictual interactions between a preschool age child's action or desires and his/her parent's expectations. Parents evaluated and justified differently children's expression of resistance to their authority or expectations as a function of whether the child's action was perceived to be a moral, a conventional, or a personal matter. While parents treated moral and conventional scenarios as issues that parent should control based on moral and conventional concerns, they allow for children's assertions and decision-making around personal issues. Fathers tended to be more conventional in their thinking on parental authority and autonomy issues than mothers. However, both mothers' and fathers' judgments reflect concerns for the development of children's personal autonomy along with acknowledgment of parental responsibilities to regulate children's social and moral behaviors. Child's gender was not found to affect parents' judgment about autonomy issues for preschool age.
Studies the effects that jail time and parole have on the relationships between young fathers and their children, with research revealing how the prison structure and its programs help fathers stay in touch with sons and daughters.
Includes sections "Book reviews" and "Periodical literature."
What goes on "behind closed doors" in families is examined in this text. Through his storytelling style, Randy Day introduces readers to the family processes approach – the strategies and behaviors families use to achieve goals. The emphasis is on how families work and interact rather than on the psychological, sociological, or economic processes. It examines emotions in families, communication, relationship formation/dissolution, family rituals, and power and conflict. Chapters open with a Preview and conclude with a Summary, Study Questions, Key Terms, and Suggested Readings. Principle Boxes highlight key concepts and a Glossary defines the key terms listed at the ends of the chapters. Significantly updated with 50% new material including many new references and examples, the new edition features: A new chapter that introduces the discipline’s methodology A new chapter on relationship formation including partner selection, falling in love, commitment, sexuality, passion, and intimacy A new design reformatted to tie in with the book’s website at http://www.psypress.com/family-processes which now contains the Chapter Activity Questions that reinforce critical thinking skills, the Journal Activities that strengthen students' personal connection to the material, and the chapter Previews and Key Terms for review purposes An Instructor’s Web Resource at http://www.psypress.com/family-processes with small group and in-class exercises, lecture outlines in PowerPoint, topics for debate, suggested films, and multiple-choice, true/false, matching, and essay questions More material on the role of gender, power, genetics, and personality in relationships; families from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds and the impact of work and technology on the family; the changing nature of family structures including single parenting and gay unions; and stresses in family life. Written for undergraduate courses on family processes, family dynamics, family life, the family, and/or marriage & family interaction taught in family studies, human development, psychology, sociology, social work, education, consumer sciences, home economics, health, and nursing departments, this book also appeals to those who want to maximize the positive parts of family life and manage the inevitable challenges.
Sacred Matters explores the multi-disciplinary literature about the role of religion in family life and provides new research and a new theory about ways various aspects of the sacred are helpful and harmful. The authors hope that their new conceptual framework will stimulate new research and encourage the creation of new intervention programs designed to help families. Sacred Matters features: a new conceptual framework and theory about how, when, and why sacred matters influence family processes and outcomes new qualitative and quantitative research collected in a variety of ways from people with different religious perspectives in different geographical areas an expansion in theory and research about the role of forgiveness, sacrifice, prayer, and sanctification in family life the integration of studies and issues from psychology, sociology, family studies, anthropology, and religion. This book raises the bar in creating new theories about family processes and in the integration of theory, research, and application. It begins with a review of the previous literature and then expands the research about sanctification to create a new general theory (or model) about ways sacred processes help and hinder families. Next the authors expand the theory and research about the role of forgiveness, sacrifice, and prayer in families. New theory and research are then added about loving, coping with conflict, dealing with undesirable behavior, generational relationships, morality, and the psychosocial aspects of religion. The authors then describe ways sacred theory can be integrated with other theories and ways it provides new explanations about broader social problems. The book concludes with new quantitative research and suggestions for future research. Researchers, practitioners, and advanced students in several disciplines will find this volume valuable. It will expand and enrich the reading in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in areas such as family studies, human development, marriage and family therapy, the psychology of the family and the psychology of religion, the sociology of the family and the sociology of religion, pastoral counseling, anthropology, and social work.
Annotation Discusses the social implications of absentee fathers. Provides a text for undergraduates in social policy and should also be important for professionals concerned with family breakdown and child support.

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