Normal0falsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONEMicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Representing work by a mixture of veterans and a new generation of lithic analysts, Contemporary Lithic Analysis in the Southeast explores fresh ideas while reworking and pushing the limits of traditional methods and hypotheses. The variability in the southeastern lithic landscape over space and through time makes it a dynamic and challenging region for archaeologists. Demonstrating a holistic approach and using a variety of methods, this volume aims to derive information regarding prehistoric lifeways from lithic assemblages. The contributors use data from a wide temporal span and a variety of sites across the Southeast, ranging from Texas to South Carolina and from Florida to Kentucky. Not merely cautionary tales, these case studies demonstrate the necessity of looking beyond the bag of lithic material sitting in the laboratory to address the key questions in the organization of prehistoric lithic technologies. How do field-collection strategies bias our interpretations? What is therelationship between technological strategies and tool design? How can inferences regarding social and economic strategies be made from lithic assemblages? Contributors William Andrefsky Jr. / Andrew P. Bradbury / Philip J. Carr / CarolynConklin / D. Randall Cooper / Jason L.Edmonds / Jay D. Franklin / Albert C.Goodyear III / Joel Hardison / Lucinda M.Langston / D. Shane Miller / George H.Odell / Charlotte D. Pevny / Tara L. Potts /Sarah E. Price / Douglas Sain / Sarah C.Sherwood / Ashley M. Smallwood /Paul Thacker
This work takes as its starting point the role of fieldwork and how this has changed over the past 150 years. The author argues against progressive accounts of fieldwork and instead places it in its broader intellectual context to critically examine the relationship between theoretical paradigms and everyday archaeological practice. In providing a much-needed historical and critical evaluation of current practice in archaeology, this book opens up a topic of debate which affects all archaeologists, whatever their particular interests.
Stone is one of the oldest building materials, and its conservation ranks as one of the most challenging in the field. The use of alkoxysilanes in the conservation of stone can be traced as far back as 1861, when A. W. von Hoffman suggested their use for the deteriorating limestone on the Houses of Parliament in London. Alkoxysilane-based formulations have since become the material of choice for the consolidation of stone outdoors.l This volume, the first to cover comprehensively alkoxysilanes in stone consolidation, synthesizes the subject's vast and extensive literature, which ranges from production of alkoxysilanes in the nineteenth century to the extensive contributions from sol-gel science in the 1980s and 90s. Included are a historical overview, an annotated bibliography, and discussions of the following topics: the chemistry and physics of alkoxysilanes and their gels; the influence of stone type; commercial and noncommercial formulations; practice; lab and field evaluation of service life; and recent developments. This book is designed for conservators, scientists, and preservation architects in the field of stone conservation and will also serve as an indispensable introduction to the subject for students of art conservation and historic preservation.
This bibliography on the procurement and exploitation of chert resouces during prehistory does not aim to be exhaustive, although it is certainly extensive, but it intends to offer a broad range of publications for specialists from a variety of fields. Following an introductory discussion of lithic raw material procurement, the bibliography is divided into geological and archaeological studies. The publications listed are mainly in English but include others in European languages and encompass the years 1870 to 2001. Includes a chronological index.
This is a Foreword by an archaeologist, not a conservator, but as Brad Rodgers says, “Conservation has been steadily pulled from archaeology by the forces of specialization”(p. 3),andhewantstoremedythatsituationthroughthismanual. He seesthisworkasa“calltoactionforthenon-professionalconservator,”permitting “curators, conservators, and archaeologists to identify artifacts that need prof- sional attention and, allow these professionals to stabilize most artifacts in their own laboratories with minimal intervention, using simple non-toxic procedures” (p. 5). It is the mission of Brad’s manual to “bring conservation back into arch- ology” (p. 6). The degree of success of that goal depends on the degree to which archaeologists pay attention to, and put to use, what Brad has to say, because as he says, “The conservationist/archaeologist is responsible to make preparation for an artifact’s care even before it is excavated and after its storage into the foreseeable future”. . . a tremendous responsibility” (p. 10). The manual is a combination of highly technical as well as common sense methods of conserving wood, iron and other metals, ceramics, glass and stone, organicsandcomposits—afarbetterguidetoartifactconservationthanwasava- able to me when I ?rst faced that archaeological challenge at colonial Brunswick Town, North Carolina in 1958—a challenge still being faced by archaeologists today. The stage of conservation in 1958 is in dramatic contrast to the procedures Brad describes in this manual—conservation has indeed made great progress. For instance,acommonprocedurethenwastoheattheartifactsredhotinafurnace—a method that made me cringe.
One Saturday afternoon in September 1955 a young Italian attorney, Sal Dematteo, while visiting the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, views an elaborate dagger and begins having visions of ancient Rome and Judea. As these episodes increase, interrupting his life, he consults his Jewish law partner, David Gold, and the two embark on a journey to find the meaning of Sal’s episodes and make them stop. It appears the visions have a relationship to history and are connected to Flavius Josephus, a historian and descendent of an old Jewish family. Josephus was a top military commander in the Jewish Army in the Galilee and allegedly defected to the Romans after the siege of the fortress city of Jotapata. As the quest evolves, others become deeply involved, including a psychiatrist, his nurse, a priest and a rabbi. An archaeologist, who calls himself a time detective, is also called in to help them in their search. They learn the dagger, which belonged to the ancient lawgiver, Hammurabi, was passed down through generations of Babylonian Emperors, and is now being sought by the Sicarians, a secret band of assassins who threaten the lives of those involved.
A comprehensive synthesis of Caribbean prehistory from the earliest settlement by humans more than 4000 years BC, to the time of European conquest of the islands. The Caribbean was the last large area in the Americas to be populated, and its relative isolation allowed unique cultures to develop. Samuel Wilson reviews the evidence for migration and cultural change throughout the archipelago, dealing in particular with periods of cultural interaction when groups with different cultures and histories were in contact. He also examines the evolving relationship of the Caribbean people with their environment, as they developed increasingly productive economic systems over time, as well as the emergence of increasingly complex social and political systems, particularly in the Greater Antilles in the centuries before the European conquest. Wilson also provides a review of the history of Caribbean archaeology and the individual scholars and ideas that have shaped the field.
This title will be available online in its entirety in Open Access In and Out of Suriname: Language, Mobility and Identity offers a fresh multidisciplinary approach to multilingual Surinamese society, that breaks through the notion of bounded ethnicity enshrined in historical and ethnographic literature on Suriname.
This is the first book to describe the intimate relationship between Latin literature and the politics of ancient Rome. Until now, most scholars have viewed classical Latin literature as a product of aesthetic concerns. Thomas Habinek shows, however, that literature was also a cultural practice that emerged from and intervened in the political and social struggles at the heart of the Roman world. Habinek considers major works by such authors as Cato, Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Seneca. He shows that, from its beginnings in the late third century b.c. to its eclipse by Christian literature six hundred years later, classical literature served the evolving interests of Roman and, more particularly, aristocratic power. It fostered a prestige dialect, for example; it appropriated the cultural resources of dominated and colonized communities; and it helped to defuse potentially explosive challenges to prevailing values and authority. Literature also drew upon and enhanced other forms of social authority, such as patriarchy, religious ritual, cultural identity, and the aristocratic procedure of self-scrutiny, or existimatio. Habinek's analysis of the relationship between language and power in classical Rome breaks from the long Romantic tradition of viewing Roman authors as world-weary figures, aloof from mundane political concerns--a view, he shows, that usually reflects how scholars have seen themselves. The Politics of Latin Literature will stimulate new interest in the historical context of Latin literature and help to integrate classical studies into ongoing debates about the sociology of writing.
Our daily news bulletins bring us tales of the wonder of science, from Mars rovers and intelligent robots to developments in cancer treatment, and yet often the emphasis is on the potential threats posed by science. It appears that irrationality is on the rise in western society, and public opinion is increasingly dominated by unreflecting prejudice and unwillingness to engage with factual evidence. From genetically modified crops and food, organic farming, the MMR vaccine, environmentalism, the precautionary principle and the new anti-capitalist and anti-globalisation movements, the rejection of the evidence-based approach nurtures a culture of suspicion, distrust, and cynicism, and leads to dogmatic assertion and intolerance. In this compelling and timely examination of science and society, Dick Taverne argues that science, with all the benefits it brings, is an essential part of civilised and democratic society: it offers the most hopeful future for mankind.
Improve your skills in ophthalmic photography. Learn basic and advanced techniques in fundus photography, retinal and choroidal angiography, and electronic imaging. Prepare most effectively for the OPS and JCAHPO certification exams.
This volume addresses the directions that studies of archaeological human remains have taken in a number of different countries, where attitudes range from widespread support to prohibition. Overlooked in many previous publications, this diversity in attitudes is examined through a variety of lenses, including academic origins, national identities, supporting institutions, archaeological context and globalization. The volume situates this diversity of attitudes by examining past and current tendencies in studies of archaeologically-retrieved human remains across a range of geopolitical settings. In a context where methodological approaches have been increasingly standardized in recent decades, the volume poses the question if this standardization has led to a convergence in approaches to archaeological human remains or if significant differences remain between practitioners in different countries. The volume also explores the future trajectories of the study of skeletal remains in the different jurisdictions under scrutiny.
In 1966 Congress passed the National Sea Grant College Program Act to promote marine research, education, and extension services in institutions along the nation's ocean and Great Lakes coasts. In Maryland a Sea Grant Program -- a partnership among federal and state governments, universities, and industries -- began in 1977, and in 1982 the University of Maryland was named the nation's seventeenth Sea Grant College. The Maryland Sea Grant College focuses its efforts on the Chesapeake Bay, with emphasis on the marine concerns of fisheries, seafood technology, and environmental quality. Saving the Seas is a collection of eighteen essays by leading thinkers in the area of marine and environmental management. In this book the focus falls on the world's coastal seas, where stakeholders compete for intensely sought-after resources -- not only fisheries, harbors, shipping and defense infrastructure, but also culturally important places and traditional ways of life.
Archaeology, History, and Predictive Modeling will allow scholars to more easily examine the record of human activity over the past 13,000 or more years in this part of western Louisiana and adjacent portions of east Texas. It will be useful to southeastern archaeologists and anthropologists, both professional and amateur.
This new study explores the history of cross-cultural performative encounters in the Pacific from the Eighteenth century to the present. It examines Western theatrical representations of Pacific cultures and investigates how Pacific Islanders used their own cultural performances to negotiate the colonial situation.
Insight and Imagination explores the primacy of the self in organizational research, consulting, and management / leadership. Contesting the radical dichotomy between "objective" and "subjective" understanding, and the devaluation of the latter, Professor Howard F. Stein argues that the imagination of the observer, informed by his or her unconscious, can lead to a greater understanding of the psychological reality of the workplace and in turn to better informed problem solving. Insight emerges from the disciplined use of the imagination rather than its repudiation. The book brings countertransference to center stage as a tool for understanding the emotional experience of organizational life and for formulating interventions. One often neglected use of the imagination is the capacity to not have to know beforehand what one needs to learn what poet John Keats called "negative capability." Insight and Imagination proposes the use of the humanities as a means of expanding and deepening one's access to the inner life of organizations. The author draws from the art created by others and from his own poetry written and often used during an organizational consultation. Among the specific contexts discussed in this book are the experience of organizational downsizing; helping organizations to grieve after change and loss; recognizing "red herrings" in organizational decision making; the language of organizational change; recognizing hidden agendas in meetings; and reflective practice in organizational life."
Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) is one of the most powerful communication tools available. It offers an in-depth understanding of what really happens when we communicate. Anyone who has a grasp of the basic concepts and techniques involved and who learns to use them, can maximize the effectiveness of all their interpersonal communications. Completely revised and updated, this third edition of Develop your NLP Skills includes much new material, together with mini case studies and action points. It will help anyone to become more successful at work through setting effective goals; building quality relationships with colleagues and business associates; replacing conflict with co-operation; and managing mental activities for greater self-control. Invaluable to anyone interested in improving their powers of communication, Develop your NLP Skills provides practical guidance on using NLP techniques to achieve business excellence.
Most of us take it for granted that we are free agents: that we can sometimes act so as to shape our own lives and those of others, that we have choices about how to do so and that we are responsible for what we do. But are we really justified in believing this? For centuries philosophers have argued about whether free will and moral responsibility are compatible with determinism or natural causation, and they seem no closer to agreeing about it now than at any time in the past. Many contemporary philosophers have come to the conclusion that the intractability of the old argument about free will and determinism is caused by deep rooted illusions and inconsistencies in our unreflective attitudes about moral responsibility and freedom to act. Kevin Magill challenges this view and argues that the philosophical stalemate about free will has arisen through lack of attention to the content of the experiences that shape our understanding of free will and agency and through a mistaken belief that the concept of moral responsibility requires a moral and metaphysical justification. The book sets out an original account of the various ways we experience choosing, deciding and acting, which reconciles the apparently opposing intuitions that have fuelled the traditional dispute.
Effective communication is essential for business success. From training new employees to building a rapport with potential clients, the ability to deliver information, whilst achieving maximum impact, is a skill that all business people need, yet many find difficult to master. This fully revised edition continues to provide practical advice, addressing the common problems people face when making a presentation. Ideal for the inexperienced speaker or anyone wanting to improve their communication skills, Successful Presentation Skills includes tips on how to: overcome nerves; be concise; understand body language; use visual aids effectively. Now in its third edition it includes up-to-date information and tips to achieve a first-class presentation, including advice on structuring a presentaion and the advantages of using PowerPoint technology. An indispensible guide to communicating with confidence.
Concurrent enrollment programs offer high-achieving high school students the opportunity to take college credit-bearing courses taught by college-approved high school teachers. This low-cost, scalable model brings accelerated coursework to urban, suburban, and rural students. In this book, scholars explore the function of concurrent enrollment programs in addressing the gap between high school preparation and readiness for the academic and social demands of college. Experts in the education field map out the foundation for programs offering concurrent enrollment courses, including best practices and necessary elements for a sustainable, viable program that contributes to student success in higher education. Providing research-based evidence of the overwhelming benefits of such partnerships between high schools and colleges, this book is a vital tool for all educators considering adopting a concurrent enrollment program.

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