Multi-sensory environments in the classroom provide a wealth of stimulating learning experiences for all young children whose senses are still under development. Creating Multisensory Environments: Practical Ideas for Teaching and Learning is a highly practical guide to low-cost cost, easy to assemble multi-sensory environments. With a step-by-step guide to each activity, these creative learning environments focus on multi-sensory experiences and: are designed to stimulate all the sensory channels – auditory, visual, kinaesthetic, olfactory and gustatory include suggestions for extension or differentiation depending on the abilities of your pupils, or the time available encourage creative thinking and learning, and development of social and emotional skills feature clear learning Outcomes, linking with P-Scales for children with special education needs can be set up in your classroom or school hall in just a matter of minutes or be a semi-permanent feature in a small area of the classroom, convenient for use at any given moment. Although these activities will be of particular value for children with sensory impairments, they will also provide stimulating learning environments, as promoted in the themes and principles of the Early Years Foundation Stage guidance. Theory and background to multi-sensory learning is provided to enable you to adapt the suggested scenarios according to the needs of individual learners. This practical and easy to use book is an essential companion for busy classroom practitioners wanting to create a stimulating and meaningful learning environment.
This unique, fully photocopiable resource offers guidance and materials to aid those developing multisensory environments - artificially engineered spaces that encourage relaxation, social skills and learning by stimulating the five senses. Particularly useful for those working with people with multiple disabilities, this resource explains the theory underlying multisensory environments, describes the different types, and outlines the practicalities of planning, setting up and equipping a multisensory space. The resource also features useful checklists and tools for creating multisensory experiences in both designed and everyday settings, such as the kitchen, bathroom, garden or beach. Multisensory Environments is published using photocopy-friendly lay-flat binding and is an essential tool for any professional working with individuals with multiple disabilities. It is the perfect complement to Sensory Stimulation: Sensory-Focused Activities for People with Physical and Multiple Disabilities, also authored by Susan Fowler and published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
***WINNER OF A NAUTILUS 2017 SILVER MEDAL BOOK AWARD*** Adaptive Sensory Environments: An Introduction presents a cutting-edge methodology for adaptive sensory design by fostering an inter-disciplinary approach in which aspects of neuroscience, biophilia, captology, nanotechnology, kinetics, and sensemaking all play critical roles in helping adaptive architecture "tune" to occupants. Furthermore, the book illustrates how adaptive sensory environments transform and uplift quality of life in entirely new ways, by strategically unlocking the potential that technological innovations bring. By teaching scholars, researchers, practitioners, specialists, and consultants how to design architecture that guides what emerging interactive technology can do, it allows them to see deeper into an architectural design, to extend beyond interaction and, ultimately, to build environments that adapt by changing and growing with their occupants’ immediate needs and long-term goals.
First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This book provides teachers and therapists with a user-friendly bank of practical ideas and suggestions to use in the MSE for pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties. These include equipment and resources that can be used to engineer the environment to promote particular outcomes; a set of photocopiable, fast, easy to complete observation and assessment forms; a selection of practical strategies and methods that can be used in the MSE; and ideas to help teachers integrate environment, assessment and instruction to maximize individual programs.
This photocopiable resource provides the reader with a step-by-step approach to organising sensory-focused activities for carers and professionals working with people with physical, multiple or complex disabilities. Importantly, it also presents information on sensory stimulation within a framework that embraces the person's daily environment.
Creating Sensory Spaces celebrates spaces enlivened with sensual richness and provides you with the knowledge and tools necessary to create them. Drawing on numerous built case studies in ten countries and illustrated with over 85 full color images, the book presents a new framework for the design of sensory spaces including light, color, temperature, smell, sound, and touch. Bridging across disciplines of architecture, engineering, phenomenology and perceptual psychology, this book informs the design of buildings and neighborhoods that reclaim the role of the body and all the senses in creating memorable experiences of place and belonging.
We perceive and understand our environment using many sensory systems-vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and proprioception. These multiple sensory modalities not only give us complementary sources of information about the environment but also an understanding that is richer and more complex than one modality alone could achieve. As adults, we integrate the multiple signals from these sense organs into unified functional representations. However, the ease with which we accomplish this feat belies its computational complexity. Not only do the senses convey information about the environment in different neural codes, but the relationship between the senses frequently changes when, for example, the body changes posture (e.g. when the eyes move in their sockets), or indeed shape, when the body grows across development. These computational problems prompt an important question which represents the key focus of this book: How do we develop the ability to integrate the senses? While there is a considerable literature on the development of single senses, such as vision or hearing, few books have considered the development of all our senses, and more importantly, how they develop the ability to work with each other. This book is unique in exploring this extraordinary feat of human nature - how we develop the ability to integrate our senses. It will be an important book for all those in the fields of cognitive and developmental neuroscience.
​ The luxury market has transformed from its traditional conspicuous consumption model to a new experiential luxury sensibility that is marked by a change in how consumers define luxury. In a global context, it is crucial to understand why consumers buy luxury, what they believe luxury is, and how their perception of luxury value impacts their buying behavior. This handbook aims to provide a holistic approach to luxury marketing with respect to the characteristics and the key challenges and opportunities of luxury brand management. Therefore, the multifaceted contributions by authors from different parts of the world will offer both a research and management perspective of luxury marketing and deliver a concentrated body of knowledge with contributions from diverse elements.
A powerful reminder to anyone who thinks design is primarily a visual pursuit, The Senses accompanies a major exhibition at the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum that explores how space, materials, sound, and light affect the mind and body. Learn how contemporary designers, including Petra Blaisse, Bruce Mau, Malin+Goetz and many others, engage sensory experience. Multisensory design can solve problems and enhance life for everyone, including those with sensory disabilities. Featuring thematic essays on topics ranging from design for the table to tactile graphics, tactile sound, and visualizing the senses, this book is a call to action for multisensory design practice. The Senses: Design Beyond Vision is mandatory reading for students and professionals working in diverse fields, including products, interiors, graphics, interaction, sound, animation, and data visualization, or anyone seeking the widest possible understanding of design. The book, designed by David Genco with Ellen Lupton, is edited by Lupton and curator Andrea Lipps. Includes essays by Lupton, Lipps, Christopher Brosius, Hansel Bauman, Karen Kraskow, Binglei Yan, and Simon Kinnear.
In The Multisensory Museum: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Touch, Sound, Smell, Memory, and Space, museum expert Nina Levent and Alvaro Pascual-Leone, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School bring together scholars and museum practitioners from around the world to highlight new trends and untapped opportunities for using such modalities as scent, sound, and touch in museums to offer more immersive experiences and diverse sensory engagement for visually- and otherwise-impaired patrons. While attention has been paid to accessibility for the physically-impaired since passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, making buildings accessible is only the first small step in elevating museums to be centers of learning and culture for all members of their communities. This landmark book will help all museums go much further.
The answer is gastrophysics, the new area of sensory science pioneered by Oxford professor Charles Spence. Now he's stepping out of his lab to lift the lid on the entire eating experience how the taste, the aroma, and our overall enjoyment of food are influenced by all of our senses, as well as by our mood and expectations.
Sensory Stories are short stories of a few lines which are brought to life through a selection of meaningful sensory experiences. They are particularly beneficial for students with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other special educational needs (SEN). For children with PMLD, Sensory Stories can open up new avenues for communication and inclusive learning. For students with SPD and ASD, they offer a fun way of encountering sensory experiences and triggers in a safe, repetitive way, which over time can help to reduce associated anxieties. This accessible guide offers teachers, other professionals working with students with SEN and parents with a complete step-by-step guide to creating and using Sensory Stories effectively. Aiming to make Sensory Stories affordable and accessible to schools and parents alike by using everyday items found in the classroom and home, Joanna Grace provides original, ready-to-use Sensory Stories with accompanying lesson plans, games and activities and adaptations for different abilities and diagnoses. Written by an experienced SEN consultant and sensory learning specialist, this is unique and essential reading for teachers, other professionals and parents wishing to introduce the many benefits of multi-sensory storytelling to children in their care.
Attempts to define what comics are and explain how they work have not always been successful because they are premised upon the idea that comic strips, comic books and graphic novels are inherently and almost exclusively visual. This book challenges that premise, and asserts that comics is not just a visual medium. The book outlines the multisensory aspects of comics: the visual, audible, tactile, olfactory and gustatory elements of the medium. It rejects a synaesthetic approach (by which all the senses are engaged through visual stimuli) and instead argues for a truly multisensory model by which the direct stimulation of the reader’s physical senses can be understood. A wide range of examples demonstrates how multisensory communication systems work in both commercial and more experimental contexts. The book concludes with a case study that looks at the works of Alan Moore and indicates areas of interest that multisensory analysis can draw out, but which are overlooked by more conventional approaches.
"This innovative and wide-ranging book shows how storytelling can open new worlds for children with or without special educational needs. With sections that outline both therapeutic and educational approaches, the leading practitioners who contribute to this practical resource draw on their extensive experience, and distil their own approaches for the reader to use as inspiration for their own lessons. Providing a highly accessible combination of theory and practice, the contributors to this book: Define their own approach to storytelling; Describe the principles and theory that underpin their practice; Demonstrate how they work with different types of story; Provide extensive case-studies and assessment frameworks for a range of different special needs and age ranges; Provide some 'top tips' for practitioners who want to start using stories in this way. Using Storytelling to Support Children and Adults with Special Needs will be of interest to all education professionals as well as therapists, youth workers, counsellors, and storytellers and theatre practitioners working in special education"--
It has become accepted in the neuroscience community that perception and performance are quintessentially multisensory by nature. Using the full palette of modern brain imaging and neuroscience methods, The Neural Bases of Multisensory Processes details current understanding in the neural bases for these phenomena as studied across species, stages of development, and clinical statuses. Organized thematically into nine sub-sections, the book is a collection of contributions by leading scientists in the field. Chapters build generally from basic to applied, allowing readers to ascertain how fundamental science informs the clinical and applied sciences. Topics discussed include: Anatomy, essential for understanding the neural substrates of multisensory processing Neurophysiological bases and how multisensory stimuli can dramatically change the encoding processes for sensory information Combinatorial principles and modeling, focusing on efforts to gain a better mechanistic handle on multisensory operations and their network dynamics Development and plasticity Clinical manifestations and how perception and action are affected by altered sensory experience Attention and spatial representations The last sections of the book focus on naturalistic multisensory processes in three separate contexts: motion signals, multisensory contributions to the perception and generation of communication signals, and how the perception of flavor is generated. The text provides a solid introduction for newcomers and a strong overview of the current state of the field for experts.
In the spirit of encouraging international dialogue between researchers and practitioners, often working within isolated traditions, this book discusses perspectives on science education for the gifted informed by up-to-date research findings from a number of related fields. The book reviews philosophy, culture and programmes in science education for the gifted in diverse national contexts, and includes scholarly reviews of significant perspectives and up-to-date research methods and findings. The book is written in a straightforward style for students studying international perspective modules on undergraduate, but especially masters and doctoral degrees in Science Education and Gifted Education. Gifted education has come to be regarded as a key national programme in many countries, and gifted education in science disciplines is now of major importance to economic and technological development. Despite these national initiatives and developments, there are very few discussions on gifted education in science from international perspectives. This will be a valued addition to the scholarship in this emergent field.
This essential guide provides both new and established trainers with accessible, innovative and engaging strategies to create an inspirational learning environment. This professional book is suitable for early years, primary and secondary teachers, school leaders and heads of department who are supporting their teaching colleagues in schools. It offers practical advice on planning and delivering great training sessions, including suggestions on how best to share existing knowledge in a group and how to combine dialogue and written text to effectively develop ideas in the classroom. The thinking behind each idea is not only clearly explained but is accompanied with a wealth of practical strategies that can be applied to a variety of training and teaching situations. This accessible resource is designed to help busy teaching professionals motivate their colleagues and deliver effective training. Generously illustrated throughout, the book is separated into four learning phases: preparing for successful training; offering direct input through new ideas; embedding participant learning; and monitoring, evaluating and planning for the future. Becoming a Brilliant Trainer: A Teacher’s Guide to Running Sessions and Engaging Learners will be an invaluable text for both trainee and qualified teachers, school leaders and all those with an interest in delivering great training sessions.
Children are ‘hard-wired’ to learn and they learn best by being active and autonomous – exploring, discovering, creating and taking risks, in other words, by playing. However, formal, subject specific lessons and a focus on data, targets and unrealistic expectations are causing young children to be bored and stressed and this is stifling their learning. Year One in Action reveals the remarkable progress children can make when they are allowed to pursue their own interests, ideas and challenges in a superb and enabling environment supported by responsive, skilled and empathic staff. Demonstrating how a child-led approach supports the development of purposeful, calm, confident and independent children, this book offers a unique month-by-month insight into the workings of a highly successful Year One class. It covers all aspects of practice from timetabling, adult roles and transitions to the organisation of the classroom and outside area. It tracks the events of each month in the year, paying close attention to the physical environment and the learning that is taking place. Interactions between staff and children are recognised as, and exploited as, teaching opportunities. Throughout the book, Anna Ephgrave gives the reasons behind each decision made. She also explains what the outcomes have been for the children, emphasising that a child-led approach, with planning in the moment, enables rich learning across the curriculum for all children within a meaningful context. Key features include: over 150 full colour photographs to illustrate practice; photocopiable pages of planning sheets, record keeping sheets and sample letters to parents examples of individual learning journeys and planning in the moment; guidance on what to look for when assessing children’s progress; advice on risk/benefit assessments; suggestions for managing transitions and minimising stress. The achievements of these children have been remarkable and they have remained the enthusiastic, independent, happy and unique individuals that they were when they came into Year One. Written by a leading consultant teacher, this book will inspire teachers to be brave and do what is right for children – let them take the lead, trust that they want to learn and above all let them play!

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