CrimComics offers a new way to approach criminological theory by engaging students with impactful, highly visual illustrated texts. Each CrimComics Issue traces the development of the theory--placing it in social and political context--and demonstrates its application to the real world. The last page of each Issue features review questions and key terms. Issue 5, Anomie and Strain Theories, introduces students to Robert Merton's Anomie Theory, which posits that the idea of the American dream is implicated in the social production of crime. It also discusses two extensions of his theory, General Strain Theory and Institutional-Anomie Theory. Other issues include Issue 1: Origins of Criminology, Issue 2: Biology and Criminality, Issue 3: Classical and Neoclassical Criminology, and Issue 4, Social Disorganization Theory.
From a look at classics like Psycho and Double Indemnity to recent films like Traffic and Thelma & Louise, Nicole Rafter and Michelle Brown show that criminological theory is produced not only in the academy, through scholarly research, but also in popular culture, through film. Criminology Goes to the Movies connects with ways in which students are already thinking criminologically through engagements with popular culture, encouraging them to use the everyday world as a vehicle for theorizing and understanding both crime and perceptions of criminality. The first work to bring a systematic and sophisticated criminological perspective to bear on crime films, Rafter and Brown’s book provides a fresh way of looking at cinema, using the concepts and analytical tools of criminology to uncover previously unnoticed meanings in film, ultimately making the study of criminological theory more engaging and effective for students while simultaneously demonstrating how theories of crime circulate in our mass-mediated worlds. The result is an illuminating new way of seeing movies and a delightful way of learning about criminology. Instructor's Guide
Three down-on-their-luck friends in a dying Pennsylvania coal town are looking for a way out. Mitch is a rebellious malcontent whose bad attitude gets him fired from a chain box store. Doug can identify any pill by looking at it and any 1980s rock song by the first three notes, but doesn't understand credit scores. Kevin got married and had a kid too young and is now on parole after serving jail time for growing marijuana. The three of them dabble in petty crime and believe they have a talent for it, but things soon get out of hand...
CrimComics offers a new way to approach criminological theory by engaging students with impactful, highly visual illustrated texts. Each CrimComics Issue traces the development of the theory--placing it in social and political context--and demonstrates its application to the real world. The last page of each Issue features review questions and key terms. Issue 3, Classical and Neoclassical Criminology, begins with introducing students to Cesare Beccaria and Jeremy Bentham, two of the main proponents of the Classical School of criminology. This issue then outlines changes in the United States that led to a resurgence of these ideas in the latter part of the twentieth century, which influenced the development of several neoclassical criminological theories. Other issues include Issue 1: Origins of Criminology and Issue 2: Biology and Criminality.
In Criminological Theories, the noted criminologist Ronald Akers provides thorough description, discussion, and appraisal of the leading theories of crime/delinquent behavior and law/criminal justice - the origin and history of each theory and its contemporary developments and adherents. Akers offers a clear explanation of each theory (the central concepts and hypotheses of each theory as well as critical criteria for evaluating each theory in terms of its empirical validity). Researchers and librarians, as well as general readers, will find this book a very useful tool and will applaud its clear and understandable exposition of abstract concepts.
A survey of family ties benefits -- A normative framework for family ties benefits -- Applying the framework to family ties benefits -- A survey of family ties burdens -- A normative framework for family ties burdens -- Applying the framework to family ties burdens.
This text addresses the following two questions: "What kinds of problems can the law solve?" and "What kinds of problems does the law create?" Using these questions as starting points, Meier and Geis evenhandedly explore the role and function of law relating to six major issues that often divide Americans today: prostitution, drug use, homosexuality, abortion, pornography, and gambling. Statutes and public opinion have shifted dramatically over recent decades in regard to these behaviors. The book details these developments and offers explanations of why they have occurred.
The authors (of the U. of Georgia and Western Illinois U.) review and evaluate sociological, criminological, and psychological literature on the link between family life and antisocial behavior. They offer separate sections on child and adolescent antisocial behavior and adult antisocial behavior, paying particular attention to how the family socia
With contributions from leading academics, The Oxford Handbook of Criminology provides an authoritative collection of chapters covering the topics studied on criminology courses. Each chapter details relevant theory, recent research, policy developments, and current debates, and includes extensive references to aid further research.
In recent years, the lifecourse perspective has become a popular theoretical orientation toward crime. Yet despite its growing importance in the field of criminology, most textbooks give it only cursory treatment. Crime and the Lifecourse: An Introduction by Michael L. Benson provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary research and theory on the life-course approach to crime. The book emphasizes a conceptual understanding of this approach. A special feature is the integration of qualitative and quantitative research on criminal life histories. This book: provides an overview of the life course approach and describes the major concepts and issues in lifecourse theory as it applies to criminology reviews evidence on biological and genetic influences on crime reviews research on the role of the family in crime and juvenile delinquency provides a detailed discussion of the criminological lifecourse theories of Moffitt, Hagan, Sampson and Laub, and others discusses the connections between youthful crime and adult outcomes in education, occupation, and marriage presents an application of the lifecourse approach to white-collar crime discusses how macro sociological and historical developments have influenced the shape of the lifecourse in American society as it relates to patterns in crime.
CrimComics offers a new way to approach criminological theory by engaging students with impactful, highly visual illustrated texts. Each CrimComics Issue traces the development of the theory--placing it in social and political context--and demonstrates its application to the real world. The last page of each Issue features review questions and key terms. Issue 5, Anomie and Strain Theories, introduces students to Robert Merton's Anomie Theory, which posits that the idea of the American dream is implicated in the social production of crime. It also discusses two extensions of his theory, General Strain Theory and Institutional-Anomie Theory. Other issues include Issue 1: Origins of Criminology, Issue 2: Biology and Criminality, Issue 3: Classical and Neoclassical Criminology, and Issue 4, Social Disorganization Theory.
A collection of original essays addressing theories of criminal behavior that is written at a level appropriate for undergraduate students. This book offers section introductions that provide a historical background for each theory, key issues that the theory addresses, and a discussion of any controversies generated by the theory.
Criminal punishment in America is harsh and degrading--more so than anywhere else in the liberal west. Executions and long prison terms are commonplace in America. Countries like France and Germany, by contrast, are systematically mild. European offenders are rarely sent to prison, and when they are, they serve far shorter terms than their American counterparts. Why is America so comparatively harsh? In this novel work of comparative legal history, James Whitman argues that the answer lies in America's triumphant embrace of a non-hierarchical social system and distrust of state power which have contributed to a law of punishment that is more willing to degrade offenders.
How does an idea that forms in the minds of a few activists in one part of the world become a global norm that nearly all states obey? How do human rights ideas spread? In this book, Robyn Linde tracks the diffusion of a single human rights norm: the abolition of the death penalty for child offenders under the age of 18. The norm against the penalty diffused internationally through law--specifically, criminal law addressing child offenders, usually those convicted of murder or rape. Through detailed case studies and a qualitative, comparative approach to national law and practice, Linde argues that children played an important--though little known--role in the process of state consolidation and the building of international order. This occured through the promotion of children as international rights holders and was the outcome of almost two centuries of activism. Through an innovative synthesis of prevailing theories of power and socialization, Linde shows that the growth of state control over children was part of a larger political process by which the liberal state (both paternal and democratic) became the only model of acceptable and legitimate statehood and through which newly minted international institutions would find purpose. The book offers insight into the origins, spread, and adoption of human rights norms and law by elucidating the roles and contributions of principled actors and norm entrepreneurs at different stages of diffusion, and by identifying a previously unexplored pattern of change whereby resistant states were brought into compliance with the now global norm against the child death penalty. From the institutions and legacy of colonialism to the development and promotion of the global child--a collection of related, still changing norms of child welfare and protection--Linde demonstrates how a specifically Western conception of childhood and ideas about children shaped the current international system.
Covering major U.S. Supreme Court cases on juvenile law, this book addresses society's concerns about youth by focusing on how the law impacts them. Divided into two parts, the book first covers landmark cases that define the legal rights of youth within the juvenile justice process and then focuses on the legal rights of youth at school. Chapters are introduced with a brief discussion of the topic and case comments are provided before each U.S. Supreme Court case. This important collection summarizes the key legal issues before the court and captures the cases that have had a profound impact on the lives of minors.Covers every major U.S. Supreme Court case on juvenile law since 1966. Part I covers cases on the justice system including investigation of crimes, court processing, dispositions, and even the death penalty. Part II focuses on the educational system and includes topics such as school prayer, free speech, discipline, search and seizure in schools, and drug testing of students. Includes the Supreme Court'smajority opinionin each case because this opinion reflects the opinion of the Justices that voted in favor of the ruling.Law enforcement professionals involved with Juvile Law.
Public knowledge of crime and criminal justice often develops through the media to the extent that, for some people, the media may be their sole source of information on these issues and systems. The role that the media plays in shaping public perceptions of crime and criminality, and framingdebates about criminal justice and responses to crime, is therefore undeniable. For these reasons, questions of media influence have become a prominent aspect of criminological theorising and inquiry. Media and Crime offers a new and innovative approach to these debates and analysis by combining the skills and expertise of journalism and media studies with criminological knowledge to critically interrogate the nexus between the media and crime, and the linkages between process, practice andrepresentation. Wide-ranging in subject matter, and international in scope, it provides a theoretically informed analysis of media constructions of crime, criminality and criminal justice. Media and Crime will be of interest to scholars, practitioners and students of journalism, media studies,criminology, sociology, and the general reader.
Easily accessible to undergraduates, Significant Cases in Criminal Procedure, Second Edition, offers a clear, comprehensive introduction to criminal procedure. Rather than providing complete opinions, which may overwhelm students, the authors present case briefs, along with analyses, explanations, and short excerpts. In addition to the case summaries, the book includes lists of all of the cases it covers, both in alphabetical order and grouped by topic; a short introduction to each topic; and an index. CRIMINAL JUSTICE CASE BRIEFS SERIES Significant Cases in Criminal Procedure, Second Edition Craig Hemmens, Alan Thompson, and Lisa S. Nored (978-0-19-995791-0) Significant Cases in Corrections, Second Edition Craig Hemmens, Barbara Belbot, and Katherine Bennett (978-0-19-994858-1) Significant Cases in Juvenile Justice, Second Edition Craig Hemmens, Benjamin Steiner, and David Mueller (978-0-19-995841-2)
Uses case studies, interviews, and the most up-to-date research to explore the connections between transnational crime and organized crime -- Back cover.
Theories of Delinquency is a comprehensive survey of the theoretical approaches towards understanding delinquent behavior. Donald Shoemaker aptly presents all major individualistic and sociological theories in a standard format with basic assumptions, important concepts, and critical evaluations. Theories covered include biological and psychological explanations, anomie and social disorganization, differential association, drift theory, labeling theory, critical theories, and explanations of female delinquency. Now in its sixth edition, Theories of Delinquency contains up-to-date discussions based on current research throughout, extensive revisions to control theories, especially the general theory of crime, and expanded coverage of integrated and cutting-edge theories. Clearly written, consistently organized, and now thoroughly updated, Theories of Delinquency remains essential reading for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of crime and delinquency.

Best Books