Scholarly interest in the history of crime has grown dramatically in recent years. Adopting an international and interdisciplinary perspective to investigate the historical discourses of crime in Europe and the United States from the sixteenth to the late
Scholarly interest in the history of crime has grown dramatically in recent years and, because scholars associated with this work have relied on a broad social definition of crime which includes acts that are against the law as well as acts of social banditry and political rebellion, crime history has become a major aspect not only of social history, but also of cultural as well as legal studies. This collection explores how the history of crime provides a way to study time, place and culture. Adopting an international and interdisciplinary perspective to investigate the historical discourses of crime in Europe and the United States from the sixteenth to the late twentieth century, these original works provide new approaches to understanding the meaning of crime in modern western culture and underscore the new importance given to crime and criminal events in historical studies. Written by both well-known historians and younger scholars from across the globe, the essays reveal that there are important continuities in the history of crime and its representations in modern culture, despite particularities of time and place.
Working broadly from the perspective of cultural criminology, Crime, Media and Culture engages with theories and debates about the nature of media-audience relations, examines representations of crime and justice in news media and fiction, and considers the growing significance of digital technologies and social media. The book discusses the multiple effects media representations of crime have on audiences but also the ways media portrayals of crime and disorder influence government policy and lawmaking. It also considers the processes by which certain stories are selected for their newsworthiness. Also examined are the theoretical, conceptual and methodological underpinnings of cultural criminology and its subfields of visual criminology and narrative criminology. Drawing on case studies and empirical examples from the increasingly blurred worlds of reality and entertainment, the dynamics of crime, media and culture are illuminated across a range of chapters covering topics that include: moral panics/folk devils and trial by media; fear of crime; cop shows and courtroom dramas; female criminality and child-on-child killing; serial killers; surveillance, new media and policing; organized crime and state crime. Crime, Media and Culture will be an invaluable resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students interested in criminology and media studies. The book will also prove useful for lecturers and academic researchers wishing to explore the intersections of crime, media and cultural inquiry.
Thoroughly updated and greatly expanded from its original edition, this three-volume set is the go-to comprehensive resource on the legal, social, psychological, political, and public health aspects of guns in American life. • 450 alphabetically organized entries, including 100 new for this edition, covering key issues (suicide, video games and gun violence, firearm injury statistics) and events (workplace shootings, the Virginia Tech massacre) • 102 expert contributors from all academic fields involved in studying the causes and effects of gun violence • A chronology of pivotal moments and controversies in the history of firearm ownership and use in the United States • An exhaustive bibliography of print and online resources covering all aspects of the study of guns in the United States • Appendices on federal gun laws, state gun laws, and pro- and anti-gun-control organizations
This text provides a comprehensive overview of the criminal justice and criminology curriculum through contributed essays designed to review and expand upon key areas of study. The text will explore and examine theory, cases, laws and policies as they have been shaped by a larger social, cultural, and historical context. Topics span the gamut of the Criminal Justice and Criminology curriculum, including crime theory, law enforcement, jurisprudence, corrections and organizations.
In the fourth edition of Essential Criminology, authors Mark M. Lanier, Stuart Henry, and Desiré J.M. Anastasia build upon this best-selling critical review of criminology, which has become essential reading for students of criminology in the 21st century. Designed as an alternative to overly comprehensive, lengthy, and expensive introductory texts, Essential Criminology is, as its title implies, a concise overview of the field. The book guides students through the various definitions of crime and the different ways crime is measured. It then covers the major theories of crime, from individual-level, classical, and rational choice to biological, psychological, social learning, social control, and interactionist perspectives. In this latest edition, the authors explore the kind of criminology that is needed for the globally interdependent twenty-first century. With cutting-edge updates, illustrative real-world examples, and new study tools for students, this text is a necessity for both undergraduate and graduate courses in criminology.
Assuming no prior knowledge, this text provides a clear and user-friendly introduction to the key definitions and issues of crime. With an unrivalled combination of scope plus introductory pitch, this is a one-stop shop for undergraduates taking their first modules in criminology and criminal justice.
Criminologist Nicole Rafter analyses the source of the appeal of crime films, and their role in popular culture. She argues that crime films both reflect and shape our ideas about fundamental social, economic and political issues.
This sixth volume Advances in Criminological Theory is testimony to a resurgent interest in anomie-strain theory, which began in the mid-1980s and continues unabated into the 1990s. Contributors focus on the new body of empirical research and theorizing that has been added to the anomie tradition that extends from Durkheim to Merton. The first section is a major, 75-page statement by Robert K. Merton, examining the development of the anomie-and-opportunity-struc-ture paradigm and its significance to criminology. The Legacy of Anomie Theory assesses the theory's continuing usefulness, explains the relevance of Merton's concept of goals/means disparity as a psychological mechanism in the explanation of delinquency, and compares strain theory with social control theory. A macrosociological theoretical formulation is used to explain the association between societal development and crime rates. In other chapters, anomie is used to explain white-collar crime and to explore the symbiotic relationship between Chinese gangs and adult criminal organizations within the cultural, economic, and political context of the American-Chinese community. Contributors include: David F. Greenberg, Sir Leon Radzinowicz, Richard Rosenfeld, Steven F. Messner, David Weisburd, Ellen Chayet, Ko-lin Chin, Jeffrey Pagan, John P. Hoffmann, Timothy Ireland, S. George Vincent-nathan, Michael J. Lynch, W. Byron Groves, C. Ray Jeffery, Gilbert Geis, Thomas J. Bernard, Nikos Passas, Robert Agnew, Gary F. Jensen, Deborah V. Cohen, Elin Waring, and Bonnie Berry. The Legacy of Anomie Theory \s important for criminologists, sociologists, psychologists, and other professionals seeking to understand crime and violence in culture.
Covering all the major areas of the subject, this introduction to criminology features specific topics such as the history and theory of criminology and categories of crime.
This new edition of the Handbook of Policing updates and expands the highly successful first edition, and now includes a completely new chapter on policing and forensics. It provides a comprehensive, but highly readable overview of policing in the UK, and is an essential reference point, combining the expertise of leading academic experts on policing and policing practitioners themselves.
Dina Siegel and Hans Nelen The term ‘global organized crime’ has been in use in criminology since the mid 1990s. Even more general and abstract than its daughter-terms (transnational or cross-border organized crime), ‘global organized crime’ seems to embrace the activities of criminal groups and networks all around the planet, leaving no geographical space untouched. The term appears to cover the geographical as well as the historical domain: ‘global’ has taken on the meaning of ‘forever and ever’. Global organized crime is also associatively linked with ‘globalisation’. The social construction of both terms in scientific discourse is in itself an interesting theme. But perhaps even more interesting, especially for academics trying to conduct empirical research in this area, is the analysis of the symbolic and practical meaning of these concepts. How should criminologists study globalisation in general and global organized crime in particular? Which instruments and ‘theoretical luggage’ do they have in order to conduct this kind of research? The aim of this book is not to formulate simple, straightforward answers to these questions, but rather to give an overview of contemporary criminological research combining international, national and local dimensions of specific organized crime pr- lems. The term global organized crime will hardly be used in this respect. In other social sciences, such as anthropology, there is a tendency to get rid of vague and abstract terms which can only serve to confuse our understanding. In our opinion, criminology should follow this initiative.
Race and Crime is a core text for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students taking courses in race, criminal justice, ethnic studies and sociology. It may also be adopted into courses such as race relations, race and ethnicity and minorities, race gender and class in departments of sociology, ethnic or black studies. Features new to this edition include: -the expansion and update of theoretical frameworks -fully updated and expanded research references -additional material on racial and ethnic groups -highlighted boxes with explanation of key issues and international perspectives -ancillary resources including an IRCD and student study site.
Knafla brings together major young and senior historians to explore common problems and issues that emerge from the cross-examination of policing and warring in modern European society. The volume demonstrates as a whole that the work of police in our communities is affected decisively by the internal and external policies of the nation state.
Conducting research into crime and criminal justice carries unique challenges. This Handbook focuses on the application of 'methods' to address the core substantive questions that currently motivate contemporary criminological research. It maps a canon of methods that are more elaborated than in most other fields of social science, and the intellectual terrain of research problems with which criminologists are routinely confronted. Drawing on exemplary studies, chapters in each section illustrate the techniques (qualitative and quantitative) that are commonly applied in empirical studies, as well as the logic of criminological enquiry. Organized into five sections, each prefaced by an editorial introduction, the Handbook covers: • Crime and Criminals • Contextualizing Crimes in Space and Time: Networks, Communities and Culture • Perceptual Dimensions of Crime • Criminal Justice Systems: Organizations and Institutions • Preventing Crime and Improving Justice Edited by leaders in the field of criminological research, and with contributions from internationally renowned experts, The SAGE Handbook of Criminological Research Methods is set to become the definitive resource for postgraduates, researchers and academics in criminology, criminal justice, policing, law, and sociology. David Gadd is Professor of Criminology at Manchester University School of Law where he is also Director of the Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice. Susanne Karstedt has a Chair in Criminology and Criminological Justice at the University of Leeds. Steven F. Messner is Distinguished Teaching Professor of Sociology, University at Albany, State University of New York.
Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2011 im Fachbereich Jura - Strafprozessrecht, Kriminologie, Strafvollzug, , Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: 1.Einleitung 2. Geschichte der Kriminologie 2.1.Vorläufer und empirische Ansätze 2.2 Erste theoretischen Impulse der klassische Schule der Kriminologie 2.2.1 Cesare Beccaria als Begründer der klassischen Kriminologie 2.2.2 Weitere Vertreter der klassischen Schule 2.2.3 Auswirkungen der klassischen Schule 2.3 Die positivistische Kriminologie 2.3.1 Ursprung der anthropologischen Schule 2.3.2 Italienisch- krimalanthropologische Schule 2.3.2.1 Cesare Lombroso: Begründer der empirischen Kriminologie 2.3.2.2 Weitere Vertreter der italienischen Schule 2.3.2.3 Relevanz der italienischen Schule für die Kriminologie 2.3.3 Französisch- kriminalsoziologische Schule 2.3.3.1 Vorläufer der Kriminalsoziologie 2.3.3.2 Kriminalsoziologische Ansätze von Tarde, Lacassagne und Durkheim 2.3.3.3Auswirkungen der französischen Schule auf die Kriminologie 2.3.4 Vereinigungslehre Franz von Liszt 2.4 Nordamerikanische Kriminologie gegen Ende des 19. bis zur Mitte des 20.Jahrhunderts 2.4.1 Kinderretterbewegung 2.4.2 Ansätze einer klinischen Kriminologie 2.4.3 Empirisch ausgerichteter Mehrfaktorenansatz Glueck 2.4.4 Entwicklung der Kriminalökologie in Chicago Shaw/McKay 2.4.5 Organisierten Kriminalität Thrasher 2.4.6 Die Wurzeln der „radikalen Kriminologie“ (Labeling Approach) 2.4.7 Frauenkriminalität (Parmelee) 2.4.8 Anfänge einer Viktimologie von Hentig 2.4.9 Anfänge einer vergleichenden Kriminologie Reckless 2.4.10 Sutherlands Einfluss auf die Kriminologie 2.5 Kriminologische Entwicklung in Deutschland 2.5.1 Deutsche Entwicklung am Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts bis in die 30er Jahre 2.5.2 Kriminologie im „Dritten Reich“ 2.5.3 Kriminologie in der ehemaligen DDR 2.5.4 Die deutsche Kriminologie nach dem 2. Weltkrieg in den alten Bundesländern 2.6 Die amerikanische Kriminologie nach dem 2. Weltkrieg 2.6.1 Paradigmawechsel der Kriminologie "Labeling Approach“ 2.6.1.1 Labeling Approach 2.6.1.2 Relevanz und Kritik des Labeling Approach 2.6.1.3 Auswirkungen des Labeling Ansatzes auf die deutsche Kriminologie 3. Zusammenfassung und Ausblick
The fifth edition of Criminology offers updated coverage of the main criminological theories. An engaging read for students of criminology, it traces the history and development of these key theories, and provides full references to guide the reader in their further criminological studies.
The Second Edition of this best-selling text provides a fully revised and up-to-date critical analysis of a wide range of issues surrounding young people, disorder and crime. To develop a comprehensive criminology of youth the book deliberately moves beyond traditional criminological concerns and draws insights from other academic disciplines such as cultural studies, gender studies, media studies, social policy, social work, political science and human geography. Now thoroughly updated, this second edition has been rewritten to include new material on anti-social behaviour, street crime, youth gangs, victimisation, social exclusion, drugs, surveillance, crime prevention, policing and restoration as well as a sustained critical analysis of New Labour's youth, social and criminal justice reforms as they have emerged over the past five years. To make sense of these developments theories of risk management, governance, globalisation and cultural criminology are introduced and assessed. Building on the strengths of the first edition, this highly influential work remains the most integrated and comprehensive analysis of theory, research, policy and politics in this area. It is an essential text for students of criminology, criminal justice, sociology, youth studies, social policy and social work.
Written by some of the leading criminologists in the country, this new title is a 'one-stop shop' for those who teach, study or are interested in criminology and the criminal justice systems of the UK.

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