"An ideal introduction to the rich history of criminal justice charting all its main developments from the dooms of Anglo-Saxon times to the rise of the Common Law, struggles for political, legislative and judicial ascendency and the formation of the innovative Criminal Justice System of today."-back cover.
Covering criminal justice history on a cross-national basis, this book surveys criminal justice in Western civilization and American life chronologically from ancient times to the present. It is an introduction to the historical problems of crime, law enforcement and penology, set against the background of major historical events and movements. Integrating criminal justice history into the scope of European, British, French and American history, this text provides the opportunity for comparisons of crime and punishment over boundaries of national histories. The text concludes with a chapter that addresses terrorism and homeland security. * Spans all of western history, and examines the core beliefs about human nature and society that informed the development of criminal justice systems. The fifth edition gives increased coverage of American law enforcement, corrections, and legal systems * Each chapter is enhanced with supplemental "Timeline," "Time Capsule," and "Featured Outlaw" boxes as well as discussion questions, notes and problems * Contains discussion questions, notes, learning objectives, key terms lists, biographical vignettes of key historical figures, and "History Today" exercises to engage the reader and encourage critical thinking
This text concentrates on the apprehension, investigation and trial of suspected offenders, overlaying its analysis with a critical appraisal of the system and suggesting pointers to improvement.
Comprehensive overview of the Irish criminal justice system, its current problems and its vision for the future. Collection of essays by major office-holders, experienced practitioners, leading academics, legal scholars, sociologists, psychologists, philosophers and educationalists.
This work addresses perspectives on the judicial, correctional and law enforcement components of the criminal justice system, including history, ethics, prevention, intervention, due process, marginalized populations, international consequences and demands for professionalism. It also examines critical variations in the criminal justice systems of countries worldwide.
Criminal Justice: An Introduction is a complete introductory text for the most basic and widely-studied course in this subject area. Each chapter begins with behavioral objectives and a list of key terms. A variety of strategies are designed into the text to hold the attention of reader: key terms in bold lettering, side margin notes (containing interesting facts and challenging questions), boxed justice events and international perspectives, and over 80 photographs, tables and figures. Each chapter ends with applications that enable the student to apply the material to real life situations. This text competes with larger books by offering a complete but succinct and less expensive introduction to criminal justice, which will be more manageable for community colleges and colleges with shorter terms. The instructor's manual will assist educators with special projects and test questions and answers. The accompanying disk challenges students with interactive exercises. An excellent entry-level textbook for undergraduate criminal justice students. Written by an instructor of criminal justice and security for over 20 years. Includes an instructor's manual and a disk with interactive exercises for students.
This critical yet honest appraisal of our criminal justice system addresses its strengths and its flaws—and makes recommendations for improvement. * Provides an extensive bibliography including books, journal articles, newspaper accounts, and government documents * Includes a chronology
This new and expanded edition builds upon material from the highly successful first edition. A comprehensive textbook on the criminal justice system, the book assesses the main theories concerned with the causes of crime (including white-collar and corporate crime), discusses the operation of all key criminal justice agencies - including the police, probation and prison services and the legal and youth justice systems -and identifies the main themes underpinning contemporary criminal justice policy. Key additions include: updated material from the first edition incorporating changes to criminal justice policy introduced by the 2010 Coalition government a new chapter that presents an overview of the criminal justice system discussions of the evolving EU criminal justice system and the implications of this for UK criminal justice policy. The book is an ideal text for students taking courses in criminal justice, or studying criminal justice as a component of a broader course in criminology or the social sciences and practitoners within these fields. It is written in a highly accessible manner and has a wide range of features that include: questions key chapter themes timeline of main events glossary of key terms website resource guide.
Experts provide important insights on the intent and subsequent outcome of legislated change at the national and local levels in the area of criminal justice and women. Here is a revealing examination of the impact of judicial and legislative changes on the treatment of female victims and offenders in the areas of corrections, domestic violence, sexual assault, and prostitution look at actual case studies demonstrates that the condition of women's lives will not be changed merely by going to court or getting a new law. This is an enlightening book for readers who may believe that discrimination can be eliminated through legal changes alone.
The criminal justice system is a key social institution pertinent to the lives of citizens everywhere. Fundamentals of Criminal Justice: A Sociological View, Second Edition provides a unique social context to explore and explain the nature, impact, and significance of the criminal justice system in everyday life. This introductory text examines important sociological issues including class, race, and gender inequality, social control, and organizational structure and function.
Examines the impact of DNA technology on issues of ethics, civil liberties, privacy, and security.
In 1994 the School of Criminology, a part of the Department of Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure and Criminology in the Faculty of Law of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its study programme. To give added lustre to this landmark in its history, the Institute accepted the invitation from the International Society of Criminology to organise the 49th International Course of Criminology. The title of the course was: Changes in Society, Crime and Criminal Justice in Europe. A challenge for criminological education and research'. This course explored two themes, both of which are likely to be the focus of debate in criminal policy in the near future: crime and insecurity in the city, and international organised and corporate crime. The presentation and discussion of both themes followed two main approaches. Lectures and seminars focused on the analysis of the nature, the quantity and the development of the phenomena, and meetings were focused on the policy needed to gain control of these phenomena. Moreover, attention was paid to technical and ethical problems which show up at the moment that empirical research is carried out. This publication brings together the main part of the introductory lectures. Part one relates to the theme of crime and insecurity in the city; the second part contains the lectures on international organised and corporate crime. Together both parts present a good picture of what was explained and commented on during the Course, especially in relation to important European developments concerning crime, criminal justice and criminal policy. This book will become an important source of inspiration for both criminological educationand research.
With this collection of essays, Jack Kamerman presents the first sustained examination of one of the underpinnings of the operation of the criminal justice system: the issue of responsibility for actions and, as a consequence, the issue of accountability. Unique in the breadth of its approach, this volume examines the issue of responsibility from the perspectives of criminal justice professionals, sociologists, philosophers, and public administrators from four countries. Attacking the problem on various levels, the essayists look first at the assumptions made by criminal justice institutions regarding offender responsibility, then turn to the views of offenders on the causes of their own actions and to the consequences of offenders either to accept or deny responsibility. These scholars also examine the social and psychological circumstances under which people in general accept or deny responsibility for what they do, thus providing the basis for understanding the process of social distance as a major precondition for people to commit atrocities without seeing themselves as responsible. Understanding the circumstances under which people either distance themselves from or embrace responsibility enables criminologists to make grounded recommendations for reordering responsibility in the criminal justice system and, more generally, for restoring a sense of responsibility to organizations, occupations, and society. Aside from Kamerman, the contributors are William C. Collins, Charles Fethe, Gilbert Geis, Robert J. Kelly, Alison Liebling, Jess Maghan, Mark Harrison Moore, Paul Neurath, John Rakis, William Rentzmann, and José E. Sánchez.
Rule of law has vanished in America’s criminal justice system. Prosecutors decide whom to punish; most accused never face a jury; policing is inconsistent; plea bargaining is rampant; and draconian sentencing fills prisons with mostly minority defendants. A leading criminal law scholar looks to history for the roots of these problems—and solutions.
Criminal Justice: Local and Global and its sister text Crime: Local and Global are two new teaching texts that aim to equip the reader with a critical understanding of the globally contested nature of 'crime' and'justice'. Through an examination of key concepts and criminological approaches, the books illuminate the different ways in which crime is constructed, conceived and controlled. International case studies are used to demonstrate how 'crime' and 'justice' are historically and geographically located in terms of the global/local context, and how processes of criminalisation and punishment are mediated in contemporary societies. Criminal Justice: Local and Global covers the way the 'local' can be widened out to look at international, transnational and supranational aspects of justice. This means that issues such as corporate crime and human rights can be discussed in a comparative and critical way, examining the possibility, for example of an International Criminal Court, cross-national jurisdictions of regulation and control (such as Interpol) and so on. Each chapter covers a different area of regulation, punishment and process. Unlike previous texts, the book's approach will be an innovative approach to widen 'justice' to encompass considerations beyond simple, local jurisdictions. The book will take instances of 'justice' in one jurisdiction and use global examples to illustrate how ambiguous the concept of 'justice' can be.
There are many controversial aspects of our criminal justice system, and this encyclopedia examines the most significant controversies throughout American history with emphasis on current debates, trends, and issues. Arranged alphabetically, approximately 100 entries cover background, explanations, notable cases and events, various sides of an issue, and what to expect in the future. Entries are objective and factual, allowing readers to formulate their own conclusions. Sidebars and case examples help to illustrate each entry, and sources for further reading point readers to other important materials. Given the prevalance of controversial criminal justice topics in the news, this timely reference is an important resource for anyone interested in crime and justice. Entries include: Boot Camps, Corporal Punishment, DNA Evidence, Domestic Violence, Expert Testimony, Eye Witness Identifications, Gun Control, Homeland Security, International Criminal Court, Legalization of Marijuana, Mental Health and Insanity, Police Brutality, Prison Violence, Racial Profiling, School Violence, Sex Offender Laws, Stalking Laws, Supermax Prisons, Three Strikes, Treating Juveniles as Adults, War on Drugs, and more.
Young black people and the criminal justice System : Second report of session 2006-07, Vol. 2: Oral and written Evidence
'The social landscape of 'race' and 'ethnicity' within contemporary Britain has become increasingly diverse and complex. The old, exclusive research emphasis in criminology on the outcomes of social inequalities and policies is now challenged by an appreciation of how race and ethnicity are constructed and other theoretical perspectives. This collection of papers will introduce students to these subjects, and do so usefully by addressing contemporary themes that must be given attention by criminologists.' - Professor Simon Holdaway, University of Sheffield 'This collection provides useful and up-to-date information on the response of police, prosecution, prisons and probation services to the challenges of increasing ethnic diversity. It is an excellent source for students and practitioners concerned with reforming policy and improving practice.' - Professor David J. Smith, University of Edinburgh & London School of Economics This text delivers a comprehensive overview of race and ethnicity across the criminal justice system. It unpacks terms such as 'race', 'diversity' and 'multiculturalism' to equip students with a thorough understanding of this complex subject area. Featuring chapters by leading experts, Race and Criminal Justice provides a specialist introduction to each area of the criminal justice system, including police, prosecution, prisons and probation. It also features stimulating discussion of contemporary issues, such as criminal justice responses to refugees and asylum seekers, and the experiences of Muslims within the criminal justice system post-9/11 and 7/7. Each chapter follows a consistent structure, offering: " an overview of key theories relating to the study of race, ethnicity and criminal justice " analysis of research, policy and practice " chapter summaries and further reading to support understanding.
A comprehensive and accesible overview of the operation of the American criminal justice system. This handbook's extensive coverage of the criminal justice system in the U.S. makes it an important reference for students and scholars in criminal justice, law, and public policy.

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