Rule of law has vanished in America’s criminal justice system. Prosecutors decide whom to punish; most accused never face a jury; policing is inconsistent; plea bargaining is rampant; and draconian sentencing fills prisons with mostly minority defendants. A leading criminal law scholar looks to history for the roots of these problems—and solutions.
Careers in Criminal Justice, Second Edition prepares you to plan, pursue, and realize your career goals—from conception through the hiring process. Coy H. Johnston’s contemporary approach emphasizes self-reflection and pragmatism in the pursuit of self-fulfillment and professionalism. With coverage of over forty careers in policing, courts, corrections, and victim services, you receive a comprehensive overview of the most popular and growing careers in the field. Self-assessment tools enhance your self-awareness and steer you toward realistic and suitable careers in criminal justice. This easy-to-read guide is organized to prepare and encourage growth throughout your career. New to the Second Edition: A new chapter titled “Volunteering and Internship” (Chapter 9) guides you through the important process of early involvement in the field to create a more enticing resume. Three new “Guest Speaker” profiles offer you new perspectives and practical advice on a variety of careers and geographical areas. New career assessment tools are included to help you evaluate your compatibility with various careers in the criminal justice field. Expanded information about critical areas such as private prisons, careers in the judiciary, and resume building ensures that you are receiving a balanced introduction to criminal justice careers.
Introduction to Criminal Justice, Ninth Edition, provides a comprehensive study of the criminal justice system. The book opens with a discussion on the fundamentals of criminal justice, focusing on crime and the criminal law, and progresses through detailed analysis of the major components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the administration of justice, and corrections. An entire chapter is devoted to the juvenile justice system. Authors Robert M. Bohm and Keith N. Haley, experts on the subject with nearly 100 years of experience between them as both practitioners and teachers, present criminal justice students with an engaging narrative that encourages them to think critically about the subject. The Connect course for this offering includes SmartBook, an adaptive reading and study experience which guides students to master, recall, and apply key concepts while providing automatically-graded assessments. Digital • Connect®—The Connect Suite effectively engages students in the course so they are better prepared for class, more active in discussion, and achieve better results. Its innovative and adaptive technology addresses a wide variety of student and instructor needs with a rich database of assignable and assessable activities, each attached to learning objectives. Connect, part of the Connect suite, is a web-based assignment and assessment platform that features a number of powerful tools that make managing assignments easier for instructors and learning and studying more engaging and efficient for students. •Connect InsightTM—As part of the Connect Suite, InsightTM puts real-time analytics in your hands so you can take action early and keep struggling students from falling behind. Designed for your tablet or desktop computer, Insight is a series of visual displays providing at-a-glance information regarding how your section, students, and assignments are doing. • SmartBook—As part of the Connect Suite, SmartBook is the first and only adaptive reading and learning experience that changes the way students read. It creates a personalized, interactive reading environment like no other by highlighting important concepts, while helping students identify their strengths and weaknesses. This ensures that he or she is focused on the content needed to close specific knowledge gaps, while it simultaneously promotes long term learning. •LearnSmart—As part of the Connect Suite, LearnSmart is an adaptive learning program designed to help students learn faster, study smarter, and retain more knowledge for greater success. Millions of students have answered billions of questions in LearnSmart, making it the most widely used tool that’s proven to strengthen memory recall, retain student attendance, and boost grades.
As most jurisdictions move away from the death penalty, some remain strongly committed to it, while others hold on to it but use it sparingly. This volume seeks to understand why, by examining the death penalty’s relationship to state governance in the past and present. It also examines how international, transnational and national forces intersect in order to understand the possibilities of future death penalty abolition. The chapters cover the USA - the only western democracy that still uses the death penalty - and Asia - the site of some 90 per cent of all executions. Also included are discussions of the death penalty in Islam and its practice in selected Muslim majority countries. There is also a comparative chapter departing from the response to the mass killings in Norway in 2011. Leading experts in law, criminology and human rights combine theory and empirical research to further our understanding of the relationships between ways of governance, the role of leadership and the death penalty practices. This book questions whether the death penalty in and of itself is a hazard to a sustainable development of criminal justice. It is an invaluable resource for all those researching and campaigning for the global abolition of capital punishment.
One of the few bestselling introductory criminal justice texts written by professors who actively teach the course to large numbers of undergraduates each year, INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE is uniquely attuned to the needs of today's students and instructors. Now in its sixteenth edition and known for its authoritative, solidly researched content, Siegel and Worrall's text delivers comprehensive, cutting-edge coverage of criminal justice. Extremely student friendly, the text's balanced and objective presentation is packed with provocative real-world examples and the latest developments from the field. Crisp writing, complemented by vivid illustrations, deftly guides readers through the intricate workings of the police, courts, and correctional systems; the concepts and processes of justice; and key policy issues. The book also includes an emphasis on today's criminal justice careers, offering insights from numerous professionals on the rewards and realities of their jobs. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Presents an up-to-date analysis of critical constitutional issues. Special attention is given to issues of greatest concern to criminal justice personnel — detention, arrest, search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, self-incrimination, due process, and right to counsel. Also includes constitutional aspects of criminal and civil liabilities of justice personnel, and constitutional and civil rights in the workplace. Part II presents key cases to assist in interpreting the constitutional provisions.
In New Zealand, as well as in Australia, Canada and other comparable jurisdictions, Indigenous peoples comprise a significantly disproportionate percentage of the prison population. For example, Maori, who comprise 15% of New Zealand’s population, make up 50% of its prisoners. For Maori women, the figure is 60%. These statistics have, moreover, remained more or less the same for at least the past thirty years. With New Zealand as its focus, this book explores how the fact that Indigenous peoples are more likely than any other ethnic group to be apprehended, arrested, prosecuted, convicted and incarcerated, might be alleviated. Taking seriously the rights to culture and to self-determination contained in the Treaty of Waitangi, in many comparable jurisdictions (including Australia, Canada, the United States of America), and also in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the book make the case for an Indigenous court founded on Indigenous conceptions of proper conduct, punishment, and behavior. More specifically, the book draws on contemporary notions of ‘therapeutic jurisprudence’ and ‘restorative justice’ in order to argue that such a court would offer an effective way to ameliorate the disproportionate incarceration of Indigenous peoples.
Two centuries ago, American criminal justice was run primarily by laymen. Jury trials passed moral judgment on crimes, vindicated victims and innocent defendants, and denounced the guilty. But since then, lawyers have gradually taken over the process, silencing victims and defendants and, in many cases, substituting plea bargaining for the voice of the jury. The public sees little of how this assembly-line justice works, and victims and defendants have largely lost their day in court. As a result, victims rarely hear defendants express remorse and apologize, and defendants rarely receive forgiveness. This lawyerized machinery has purchased efficient, speedy processing of many cases at the price of sacrificing softer values, such as reforming defendants and healing wounded victims and relationships. In other words, the U.S. legal system has bought quantity at the price of quality, without recognizing either the trade-off or the great gulf separating lawyers' and laymen's incentives, values, and powers. In The Machinery of Criminal Justice, author Stephanos Bibas surveys the developments over the last two centuries, considers what we have lost in our quest for efficient punishment, and suggests ways to include victims, defendants, and the public once again. Ideas range from requiring convicts to work or serve in the military, to moving power from prosecutors to restorative sentencing juries. Bibas argues that doing so might cost more, but it would better serve criminal procedure's interests in denouncing crime, vindicating victims, reforming wrongdoers, and healing the relationships torn by crime.
"I sought to write a criminal justice textbook whose central theme showcases the ways that criminal justice systems operate according to the at time conflicting, and at times complementary, goals of crime control and due process. With these models in mind, students can learn that the police, courts, and correctional systems can: strive toward the goal of repressing crime or ensuring procedural safeguards, focus on police power or judicial oversight, operate with efficiency and finality or skepticism and deliberation, employ a law and order or civil libertarian mentality, operate with a presumption of guilt or a presumption of innocence, be likened to an assembly line or obstacle course, appear to be conservative or liberal. Using Packer's classic formulation of the criminal justice system, Criminal Justice: Balancing Crime Control and Due Process (3rd Edition) can help students improve their critical thinking skills and evaluate why criminal justice practitioners make the decisions they do when processing criminal offenders. It is my hope that the crime control and due process models will help students organize and understand criminal justice as a system that is often characterize as decentralized, disorganized, and even chaotic." -- xiii, (Preface).
This book examines the relationship between gender and crime and explores both the gendered nature of crime alongside the gendered nature of criminal victimisation. Covering theory, policy and practice, this new edition has been fully revised to reflect the wider changes, development and influence of gendered thinking in these areas. It brings together a range of key issues, including: Theories and concepts in feminist criminology, Gender and victimisation, Sexual and domestic violence, Male dominance in the criminal justice system, Gendered perspectives in law and criminal justice policy. New to the third edition is increased coverage of gender and crime in international perspective, particularly within the global south, and emerging concepts of risk and security. This is essential reading for advanced courses on gender and crime, women and crime, and feminist criminology.
A vital collection for reforming criminal justice. After five decades of punitive expansion, the entire U.S. criminal justice system— mass incarceration, the War on Drugs, police practices, the treatment of juveniles and the mentally ill, glaring racial disparity, the death penalty and more — faces challenging questions. What exactly is criminal justice? How much of it is a system of law and how much is a collection of situational social practices? What roles do the Constitution and the Supreme Court play? How do race and gender shape outcomes? How does change happen, and what changes or adaptations should be pursued? The New Criminal Justice Thinking addresses the challenges of this historic moment by asking essential theoretical and practical questions about how the criminal system operates. In this thorough and thoughtful volume, scholars from across the disciplines of legal theory, sociology, criminology, Critical Race Theory, and organizational theory offer crucial insights into how the criminal system works in both theory and practice. By engaging both classic issues and new understandings, this volume offers a comprehensive framework for thinking about the modern justice system. For those interested in criminal law and justice, The New Criminal Justice Thinking offers a profound discussion of the complexities of our deeply flawed criminal justice system, complexities that neither legal theory nor social science can answer alone.
The increasing litigation against criminal justice practitioners in the United States poses a significant problem for law enforcement and other personnel. Law enforcement and corrections professionals need to have a working knowledge of both criminal law and the civil law process to ensure that they are performing their duties within the limits of the law. Civil Liability in Criminal Justice, 7th Edition, provides valuable information and recommendations to current and future officers and correctional system employees, introducing them to civil liability and federal law, as well as recommending strategies that can be taken to minimize risks. Civil Liability in Criminal Justice is unique in its combination of applicable case law and related liability research, while still providing an overview of current case law in high-liability areas. This new edition, revised to include up-to-date United States Supreme Court cases, including liability trends on the use of force, arrest-related deaths, custodial suicides in detention, qualified immunity, and the outcomes of the Department of Justice and the application of Section 14141, additional context for liability issues, and extended coverage of collective bargaining and public perception, is a valuable resource for enhancing student knowledge and practitioner job performance. The text is suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in Criminal Justice programs as well as for in-service and academy training. Ross offers an engaging, accessible introduction to this aspect of the US criminal justice system.
This book offers a comparison of the differences between the ‘public’ and ‘private’ spheres, and questions the need for law enforcement to intrude upon both. Beginning with the origins of the concept of privacy, before addressing more current thinking, the authors examine the notion of privacy and policing, using both direct (e.g. 'stop and search' methods) and technological interventions (e.g. telephone interceptions and Automatic Number Plate Recognition cameras), privacy in the space of the court, looking at what restrictions are placed on press reporting, as well as considering whether the open court ensures fair trials. Particular forms of offending and privacy are also considered: anonymity for sexual offence defendants, for example, or weighing the terrorist’s right to privacy against the safety and security of the general public. A timely discussion into the right to privacy in prison and during community sentences is also included, and Marshall and Thomas offer convin cing analysis on the importance of rehabilitation, giving consideration to police registers and the storage and maintenance of criminal records by the police and their possible future use. A diverse investigation into the many facets of privacy, this volume will hold broad appeal for scholars and students of terrorism, security, and human rights.
Revised edition of Criminal justice, [2016]
This collection presents a diverse set of case studies and theoretical reflections on how criminologists engage with practitioners and policy makers while undertaking research. The contributions to this volume highlight both the challenges and opportunities associated with doing criminological research in a reflexive and collaborative manner. They further examine the ethical and practical implications of the ‘impact’ agenda in the higher education sector with respect to the production and the dissemination of criminological knowledge. Developed to serve as an internationally accessible reference volume for scholars, practitioners and postgraduate criminology students, this book responds to the awareness that criminology as a discipline increasingly encompasses not only the study of crime, but also the agencies, process and structures that regulate it. Key questions include: How can criminal justice policy be studied as part of the field of criminology? How do we account for our own roles as researchers who are a part of the policy process? What factors and dynamics influence, hinder and facilitate ‘good policy’?
The voluntary sector has a long history of involvement in criminal justice by providing a variety of services to offenders and their families, victims and witnesses. This collection brings together leading experts to provide critical reflections and cutting edge research on the contemporary features of voluntary sector work in criminal justice. At a time when the voluntary sector's role is being transformed, this book examines the dynamic nature of the voluntary sector and its responses to current uncertainties, and some of the conflicting positions with regards to its present and future role in criminal justice work. It also examines the potential impact of economic, political and ideological trends on the role and remit of voluntary sector organisations which undertake criminal justice work.
A practical and applied introduction to criminal justice Introduction to Criminal Justice: Practice and Process shows you how to think practically about the criminal justice system by offering you a proven, problem-based approach to learning. Bestselling authors Kenneth J. Peak and Tamara D. Madensen draw on their many years of combined practitioner and academic experience to explain the importance of criminal justice and show how key trends, emerging issues, historical background, and practical lessons can be applied in the field. New to the Third Edition: An emphasis on constitutional policing, legitimacy, and procedural justice stresses the importance for police to develop a “guardian” mindset over a “soldier” mindset. New discussions of contemporary criminological theories—such as social structure theories, social process theories, social conflict theories, feminist theories, and environmental criminology theories—provide you with a concise explanation on why people commit crimes and how to prevent them in the modern world. An in-depth view of three particularly challenging problems and policy issues—terrorism, the mentally ill population, and illegal immigration—demonstrate how today’s society and the criminal justice system are affected by these issues and what can be done to address the problems. New examples and case studies of ethical dilemmas illustrate today's climate of distrust, dissension, and dysfunction to encourage you to think critically about what is considered “ethical”. New video interviews with criminal justice professionals offer you career advice, provide you with insights into a variety of career paths, and discuss challenges and misconceptions of each profession.
This book offers an accessible introduction to comparative criminal justice and examines and reflects on the ways different countries and jurisdictions deal with the main stages in the criminal justice process, from policing to sentencing. This popular bestseller has been fully updated and expanded for the third edition. This textbook provides the reader with: a comparative perspective on criminal justice and its main components; a knowledge of methodology for comparative research and analysis; an understanding of the emerging concepts in comparative criminal justice, such as security, surveillance, retribution and rehabilitation; a discussion of global trends such as the global drop in crime, the punitive turn, penal populism, privatization, international policing and international criminal tribunals. The new edition has been fully updated to keep abreast with this growing field of study and research, including increased coverage of the challenge of globalization and its role and influence on criminal justice systems around the world. Topics such as state crime, genocide and the international criminal court have also grown in prominence since the publication of the last edition and are given increased coverage. This book will be perfect reading for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates taking courses in comparative criminal justice and those who are engaged in the study of global responses to crime. New features such as lists of further reading, study questions and boxed case studies help bring comparative criminal justice alive for students and instructors alike.
This book provides a comprehensive study of the neglected story of the involvement of the women's movement with criminal justice policy in the 20th century. Taking the topic from the 'suffragette' era to the early days of 'second-wave' feminism, the book argues that criminal justice policy has been a continual concern for feminists.
While international criminal courts have often been declared as bringing ‘justice’ to victims, their procedures and outcomes historically showed little reflection of the needs and interests of victims themselves. This situation has changed significantly over the last sixty years; victims are increasingly acknowledged as having various ‘rights’, while their need for justice has been deployed as a means of justifying the establishment of international criminal courts. However, it is arguable that the goals of political and legal elites continue to be given precedence, and the ability of courts to deliver ‘justice to victims’ remains contested. This book contributes to this important debate through an examination of the role of victims as civil parties within the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia. Drawing on a series of interviews with civil parties, court practitioners and civil society actors, the book explores the way in which both the ECCC and the role of victims within it are shaped by specific political, economic and legal contexts; examining the ‘gap’ between the legitimising value of the ‘imagined victim’, and the extent to which victims are able to further their interests within the courtroom.

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