Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing is a compact but complete guide to critical thinking and argumentation. Comprising the text portion of the widely adopted Current Issues and Enduring Questions, it draws on the authors’ dual expertise in effective persuasive writing and comprehensive rhetorical strategies to help students move from critical thinking to argumentative and researched writing. This extraordinarily versatile text includes comprehensive coverage of classic and contemporary approaches to argument, from Aristotelian to Toulmin, to a new chapter on rhetorical analysis of pop culture texts, as well as 35 readings (including e-Pages that allow students to take advantage of working with multimodal arguments on the Web), and a casebook on the state and the individual. This affordable guide can stand alone or supplement a larger anthology of readings.
From Critical Thinking to Argument is a very brief but thorough guide to critical thinking and argumentation. With only a dozen readings, this affordable guide can stand alone or complement an anthology. Comprising the text portion of the widely adopted Current Issues and Enduring Questions, it draws on the authors’ dual expertise in effective persuasive writing and comprehensive rhetorical strategies to help students move from critical thinking to argumentative and researched writing. Treatment of classic and modern approaches includes Aristotle, Toulmin, and Rogerian argument, making it a versatile text. From Critical Thinking to Argument has been revised to model more strategies for creating academic arguments and provide practical advice on how to develop them.
- A concise text on critical thinking, reading, writing, and argument. The three chapters in Part One show students how to recognize and evaluate assumptions as a prelude to annotating, summarizing, and analyzing arguments. The three chapters in Part Two help students apply their critical thinking and reading skills to the tasks of writing analytical, critical, and research-based papers in MLA or APA style. The six chapters in Part Three uniquely introduce students to alternative approaches to argument.- A comprehensive and flexible argument reader with two anthologies. In addition to the 48 readings throughout the text, Parts Four and Five comprise an anthology with 55 selections that prompt students to think and write critically about 13 pressing current issues, Part Six, the second anthology, contains 29 classic selections that explore three enduring philosophical questions. In-depth casebooks -- multiple readings on controversial topics -- appear in both the text and the reader.- New to the sixth edition is coverage of visual rhetoric with images, updated and expanded research features, and more student writing.
How well can you decode the signs that permeate our daily lives? All of us, consciously or not, constantly engage in the acts of reading and interpreting the signs in the world around us. But how do we sharpen these skills, deepen our awareness of meaning in a complex world, and ultimately reach our full potential as university writers? This book answers the needs of students of composition, culture studies, and literature, providing a process-orientated guide to analyzing anything.
We are frequently confronted with arguments. Arguments are attempts to persuade us – to influence our beliefs and actions – by giving us reasons to believe this or that. Critical Thinking: A Concise Guide will equip students with the concepts and techniques used in the identification, analysis and assessment of arguments. Through precise and accessible discussion, this book provides the tools to become a successful critical thinker, one who can act and believe in accordance with good reasons, and who can articulate and make explicit those reasons. Key topics discussed include: core concepts in argumentation how language can serve to obscure or conceal the real content of arguments; how to distinguish argumentation from rhetoric how to avoid common confusions surrounding words such as ‘truth’, ‘knowledge’ and ‘opinion’ how to identify and evaluate the most common types of argument how to distinguish good reasoning from bad in terms of deductive validly and induction. This fourth edition has been revised and updated throughout, with a new introduction for each chapter and up-to-date topical examples. Particular revisions include: practical reasoning; understanding quantitative data, statistics, and the rhetoric used about them; scientific reasoning; the connection to formal logic and the logic of probability; conditionals; ambiguity; vagueness; slippery slope arguments; and arguments by analogy. The dynamic Routledge Critical Thinking companion website provides thoroughly updated resources for both instructors and students including new examples and case studies, flashcards, sample questions, practice questions and answers, student activities and a testbank of questions for use in the classroom.
Critical Reading and Writing: A Bedford Spotlight Rhetoric helps students with key writing skills. It provides advice on how to read thoughtfully and analytically, with instruction on active reading and note-taking, plus help with analyzing visual and multimodal texts. It also takes students through the writing process, explaining important concepts such as purpose, invention, rhetorical thinking, prewriting, thesis development, and organization, providing support when they need it most. Advice on using sources, revising, and editing will help them enrich, re-see, edit, and format their papers.
Writing in Response is a flexible, brief rhetoric that offers a unique focus on the critical practices of experienced readers—analysis and reflection—the skills at the heart of academic writing. It helps students compose academic essays by showing how active reading and exploratory writing bring fresh ideas to light and how informal response is developed into polished, documented prose. Extensively class tested, Writing in Response emphasizes the key techniques common to reading, thinking, and writing throughout the humanities and social sciences by teaching students the value of a social, incremental, and recursive writing process. Read the preface.
A Brief Guide to Writing Academic Arguments prepares the reader to read and write the types of argument-related source-based writing they are most likely to encounter in college.
Erycha and Touissant, although they live only a few miles apart in the San Bernardino Valley, are separated by class, violence, and history as they grow from adolescence to adulthood.
Whether regarded as a science, an art, or a skill–and it can properly be regarded as all three–logic is the basis of our ability to think, analyze, argue, and communicate. Indeed, logic goes to the very core of what we mean by human intelligence. In this concise, crisply readable book, distinguished professor D. Q. McInerny offers an indispensable guide to using logic to advantage in everyday life. Written explicitly for the layperson, McInerny’s Being Logical promises to take its place beside Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style as a classic of lucid, invaluable advice. As McInerny notes, logic is a deep, wide, and wonderfully varied field, with a bearing on every aspect of our intellectual life. A mastery of logic begins with an understanding of right reasoning–and encompasses a grasp of the close kinship between logical thought and logical expression, a knowledge of the basic terms of argument, and a familiarity with the pitfalls of illogical thinking. Accordingly, McInerny structures his book in a series of brief, penetrating chapters that build on one another to form a unified and coherent introduction to clear and effective reasoning. At the heart of the book is a brilliant consideration of argument–how an argument is founded and elaborated, how it differs from other forms of intellectual discourse, and how it critically embodies the elements of logic. McInerny teases out the subtleties and complexities of premises and conclusions, differentiates statements of fact from statements of value, and discusses the principles and uses of every major type of argument, from the syllogistic to the conditional. In addition, he provides an incisive look at illogical thinking and explains how to recognize and avoid the most common errors of logic. Elegant, pithy, and precise, Being Logical breaks logic down to its essentials through clear analysis, accessible examples, and focused insights. Whether you are a student or a teacher, a professional sharpening your career skills or an amateur devoted to the fine points of thought and expression, you are sure to find this brief guide to effecting reasoning both fascinating and illuminating.
This is the eBook of the printed book and may not include any media, website access codes, or print supplements that may come packaged with the bound book. This title is part of a new Pearson pilot program, offering students the option to rent a print textbook for Fall 2017. When given affordable access to the best learning materials and experiences from day one, students come to class better prepared and ready to succeed. Additional details on the rental program will be coming soon. For courses in argument, linguistics, and composition — or in any course where critical thinking is key. Think critically, analyze objectively, and judge soundly when you know the right questions to ask. Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking bridges the gap between simply memorizing or blindly accepting information, and the greater challenge of critical analysis and synthesis. Authors M. Neil Browne and Stuart Keeley teach readers to think critically by exploring the components of arguments — the ¿¿issues, conclusions, reasons, evidence, assumptions, and language — ¿¿and showing how to spot fallacies, manipulations, and faulty reasoning. They demonstrate how to respond to alternative points of view and make the best personal choices about what information to accept or reject. Now in its Twelfth Edition, this current and concise book greatly extends the understanding of critical thinking to writing and speaking. Additionally, the updated practice passages and exercises, as well as an enhanced visual program, add to this book’s appeal in a variety of courses and disciplines.
Elements of Argument combines a thorough argument text on critical thinking, reading, writing, and research with an extensive reader on both current and timeless controversial issues. It presents everything students need to analyze, research, and write arguments. Elements of Argument covers Toulmin, Aristotelian, and Rogerian models of argument and has been thoroughly updated with current selections students will want to read. It now includes additional support for academic writing, making it a truly flexible classroom resource. An electronic edition is available at half the price of the print book. Read the preface.
This textbook provides instruction in college level rhetoric and writing. It offers readings, a research manual, a handbook and supports a range of approaches to teaching and learning, including collaboration, visual rhetoric, personal writing, writing about literature, writing in the community and the workplace, field research, portfolios, oral presentations, essay exams, and ESL. It contains step-by-step guides to writing specific kinds of essays -- remembering events, writing profiles, explaining a concept, finding common ground, arguing a position, proposing a solution, justifying an evaluation, speculating about causes, and interpreting stories. Because so much college writing requires strong argumentation skills, four of the assignment chapters focus on argumentative writing, and a separate strategies chapter covers theses, reasons and support, counterarguments, and logical fallacies. Three full chapters on research give students useful strategies not only for conducting field, library, and Internet research, but also for evaluating sources; deciding whether to quote, paraphrase, or summarize; avoiding plagiarism; and documenting sources. The authors have included 39 readings by well-known authors and various "fresh" voices, including 12 students, providing well-written examples of the different types of essays and papers that students might be asked to complete.
Asking Good Questions moves beyond a traditional discussion of ethical theory, focusing on how educators can use these important frameworks to facilitate critical thinking about real-life ethical dilemmas. In this way, authors Nancy Stanlick and Michael Strawser offer students a theoretical tool kit for creatively addressing issues that influence their own environments. This text begins with a discussion of key ethical theorists and then guides the reader through a series of original case studies and follow-up activities that facilitate critical thinking, emphasize asking thought provoking questions, and teach the student to address the complexity of ethical dilemmas while incorporating the viewpoints of their peers. Additionally, Stanlick and Strawser include an extensive preface, a mind-mapping technique for analyzing and formulating arguments, and a six step process for approaching complex real-life moral issues. Each chapter incorporates suggested assignments, discussion questions, and references for further reading, and a guide for instructors offering a sample course schedule and suggestions on how to use this book effectively is also available. This text is designed to help educators engage students in a meaningful discussion of how historical theories apply to their own lives, providing rich and unique resources to learn about these critical issues.
Analyzes the art of reading and suggests ways to approach literary works, offering techniques for reading in specific literary genres ranging from fiction, poetry, and plays to scientific and philosophical works.
Lecturers, request your electronic inspection copy here Reading critically, and writing using critical techniques, are crucial skills you need to apply to your academic work. Practical and engaging, Critical Reading and Writing for Postgraduates is bursting with tools for analysing texts and structuring critical reviews, helping you to gradually build your skills beyond undergraduate level and gain confidence in your ability to critically read and write. New to this 3rd edition: Introduces a technique for developing critical thinking skills by interrogating paper abstracts Additional diagrams, exercises and concept explanations, enabling you to more easily understand and apply the various approaches A glossary, to help with understanding of key terms. Also new for this edition, a Companion Website provides additional resources to help you apply the critical techniques you learn. From templates and checklists, access to SAGE journal articles and additional case studies, these free resources will make sure you successfully master advanced critical skills. If you need to engage with published (or unpublished) literature such as essays, dissertations or theses, research papers or oral presentations, this proven guide helps you develop a reflective and advanced critical approach to your research and writing. SAGE Study Skills are essential study guides for students of all levels. From how to write great essays and succeeding at university, to writing your undergraduate dissertation and doing postgraduate research, SAGE Study Skills help you get the best from your time at university. Visit the SAGE Study Skills website for tips, quizzes and videos on study success!
"Literature to Go is the long-trusted anthology, The Bedford Introduction to Literature, sized and priced to go...[it] is a brief and inexpensive collection of stories, poems, and plays supported by class-tested, reliable pedagogy and unique features, that bring literature to life for students"--Pref.
Fair, witty appraisal of cranks, quacks, and quackeries of science and pseudoscience: hollow earth, Velikovsky, orgone energy, Dianetics, flying saucers, Bridey Murphy, food and medical fads, and much more.

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