Crystal Symmetries is a timely account of the progress in the most diverse fields of crystallography. It presents a broad overview of the theory of symmetry and contains state of the art reports of its modern directions and applications to crystal physics and crystal properties. Geometry takes a special place in this treatise. Structural aspects of phase transitions, correlation of structure and properties, polytypism, modulated structures, and other topics are discussed. Applications of important techniques, such as X-ray crystallography, biophysical studies, EPR spectroscopy, crystal optics, and nuclear solid state physics, are represented. Contains 30 research and review papers.
The title of our volume refers to what is well described by the following two quota tions:"Godcreated man in his own image"l and "Man creates God in his own image."2 Our approach to symmetry is subjective, and the term "personal" symmetry reflects this approach in our discussion of selected scientific events. We have chosen six icons to symbolize six areas: Kepler for modeling, Fuller for new molecules, Pauling for helical structures, Kitaigorodskii for packing, Bernal for quasicrystals, and Curie for dissymmetry. For the past three decades we have been involved in learning, thinking, speaking, and writing about symmetry. This involvement has augmented our principal activities in molecular structure research. Our interest in symmetry had started with a simple fascination and has evolved into a highly charged personal topic for us. At the start of this volume, we had had several authored and edited symmetry related books behind 3 us. We owe a debt of gratitude to the numerous people whose interviews are quoted 4 in this volume. We very much appreciate the kind and gracious cooperation of Edgar J. Applewhite (Washington, DC), Lawrence S. Bartell (University of Michigan), R.
All existing introductory reviews of mineralogy are written accord ing to the same algorithm, sometimes called the "Dana System of Mineralogy". Even modern advanced handbooks, which are cer tainly necessary, include basic data on minerals and are essentially descriptive. When basic information on the chemistry, structure, optical and physical properties, distinguished features and para genesis of 200-400 minerals is presented, then there is practically no further space available to include new ideas and concepts based on recent mineral studies. A possible solution to this dilemma would be to present a book beginning where introductory textbooks end for those already famil iar with the elementary concepts. Such a volume would be tailored to specialists in all fields of science and industry, interested in the most recent results in mineralogy. This approach may be called Advanced Mineralogy. Here, an attempt has been made to survey the current possibilities and aims in mineral matter investigations, including the main characteristics of all the methods, the most important problems and topics of mineral ogy, and related studies. The individual volumes are composed of short, condensed chap ters. Each chapter presents in a complete, albeit condensed, form specific problems, methods, theories, and directions of investigations, and estimates their importance and strategic position in science and industry.
It is gratifying to launch the third edition of our book. Its coming to life testi?es about the task it has ful?lled in the service of the com- nity of chemical research and learning. As we noted in the Prefaces to the ?rst and second editions, our book surveys chemistry from the point of view of symmetry. We present many examples from ch- istry as well as from other ?elds to emphasize the unifying nature of the symmetry concept. Our aim has been to provide aesthetic pl- sure in addition to learning experience. In our ?rst Preface we paid tribute to two books in particular from which we learned a great deal; they have in?uenced signi?cantly our approach to the subject matter of our book. They are Weyl’s classic, Symmetry, and Shubnikov and Koptsik’s Symmetry in Science and Art. The structure of our book has not changed. Following the Int- duction (Chapter 1), Chapter 2 presents the simplest symmetries using chemical and non-chemical examples. Molecular geometry is discussed in Chapter 3. The next four chapters present gro- theoretical methods (Chapter 4) and, based on them, discussions of molecular vibrations (Chapter 5), electronic structures (Chapter 6), and chemical reactions (Chapter 7). For the last two chapters we return to a qualitative treatment and introduce space-group sym- tries (Chapter 8), concluding with crystal structures (Chapter 9). For the third edition we have further revised and streamlined our text and renewed the illustrative material.
Includes specially selected articles that previously appeared in The Chemical Intelligencer magazine published (1995-2000). Excerpts of these Editor's choice chapters chronicle the culture and history of chemistry, featuring great chemists and discoverers. Contributors from among the best-known authors of the chemistry community, including numerous Nobel laureates. Features behind the scenes stories about pivotal discoveries, intricacies of laboratory life and interactions among scientists, favorite recipes of renowned researchers, life histories and anecdotes. Chapters detail the human side of science but also present scientific information communicated in an easy-to-perceive and entertaining way. This unique book is not only aimed at chemists but individuals who are interested in the cultural aspects of our science.
We have been gratified by the warm reception of our book, by reviewers, colleagues, and students alike. Our interest in the subject matter of this book has not decreased since its first appearance; on the contrary. The first and second editions envelop eight other symmetry-related books in the creation of which we have participated: I. Hargittai (ed.), Symmetry: Unifying Human Understanding, Pergamon Press, New York, 1986. I. Hargittai and B. K. Vainshtein (eds.), Crystal Symmetries. Shubnikov Centennial Papers, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1988. M. Hargittai and I. Hargittai, Fedezziikf6l a szimmetri6t! (Discover Sym- try, in Hungarian), Tank6nyvkiad6, Budapest, 1989. I. Hargittai (ed.), Symmetry 2: Unifying Human Understanding, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1989. I. Hargittai (ed.), Quasicrystals, Networks, and Molecules of Fivefold Sym- try, VCH, New York, 1990. I. Hargittai (ed.), Fivefold Symmetry, World Scientific, Singapore, 1992. I. Hargittai and C. A. Pickover (eds.), Spiral Symmetry, World Scientific, Singapore, 1992. I. Hargittai and M. Hargittai, Symmetry: A Unifying Concept, Shelter Publi- tions, Bolinas, California, 1994. We have also pursued our molecular structure research, and some books have appeared related to these activities: vi Preface to the Second Edition I. Hargittai and M. Hargittai (eds.), Stereochemical Applications of Gas-Phase Electron Diffraction, Parts A and B, VCH, New York, 1988. R. Gillespie and I. Hargittai, VSEPR Model of Molecular Geometry, Allyn and Bacon, Boston, 1991. A. Domenicano and I. Hargittai (eds.), Accurate Molecular Structures, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1992.
The last book XIII of Euclid's Elements deals with the regular solids which therefore are sometimes considered as crown of classical geometry. More than two thousand years later around 1850 Schl~fli extended the classification of regular solids to four and more dimensions. A few decades later, thanks to the invention of group and invariant theory the old three dimensional regular solid were involved in the development of new mathematical ideas: F. Klein (Lectures on the Icosa hedron and the Resolution of Equations of Degree Five, 1884) emphasized the relation of the regular solids to the finite rotation groups. He introduced complex coordinates and by means of invariant theory associated polynomial equations with these groups. These equations in turn describe isolated singularities of complex surfaces. The structure of the singularities is investigated by methods of commutative algebra, algebraic and complex analytic geometry, differential and algebraic topology. A paper by DuVal from 1934 (see the References), in which resolutions play an important rele, marked an early stage of these investigations. Around 1970 Klein's polynomials were again related to new mathematical ideas: V. I. Arnold established a hierarchy of critical points of functions in several variables according to growing com plexity. In this hierarchy Kleinls polynomials describe the "simple" critical points.
Nachdruck des Originals von 1937.
Flinx wird von düsteren Träumen und lähmenden Kopfschmerzen heimgesucht. Seine mentalen Kräfte geraten außer Kontrolle. Er sucht die einzige Person auf, der er vertraut: seine Freundin Charity. Doch die Träume scheinen ansteckend zu sein. Schon bald leidet auch Charity darunter. Das Böse selbst scheint aus den Tiefen des Universums nach ihnen zu greifen.
Diese Arbeit enthiilt zwei grof3ere Fallstudien zur Beziehung zwischen theo­ retischer Mathematik und Anwendungen im 19. Jahrhundert. Sie ist das Ergebnis eines mathematikhistorischen Forschungsprojekts am Mathemati­ schen Fachbereich der Universitiit-Gesamthochschule Wuppertal und wurde dort als Habilitationsschrift vorgelegt. Ohne das wohlwollende Interesse von Herrn H. Scheid und den Kollegen der Abteilung fUr Didaktik der Mathema­ tik ware das nicht moglich gewesen: Inhaltlich verdankt sie - direkt oder indirekt - vielen Beteiligten et­ was. So wurde mein Interesse an den kristallographischen Symmetriekon­ zepten, dem Thema der ersten Fallstudie, durch Anregungen und Hinweise von Herrn E. Brieskorn geweckt. Sowohl von seiner Seite als auch von Herrn J. J. Burckhardt stammen uberdies viele wert volle Hinweise zum Manuskript von Kapitel I. Herrn C. J. Scriba mochte ich fur seine die gesamte Arbeit betreffenden priizisen Anmerkungen danken und Herrn W. Borho ebenso fUr seine ubergreifenden Kommentare und Vorschlage. Beziiglich der in Kapitel II behandelten projektiven Methoden in der Baustatik des 19. Jahrhunderts gilt mein besonderer Dank den Herren K. -E. Kurrer und T. Hiinseroth fUr ihre zum Teil sehr detaillierten Anmerkungen aus dem Blickwinkel der Geschichte der Bauwissenschaften. Schliefilich geht mein Dank an alle nicht namentlich Erwiihnten, die in Gesprachen, technisch oder auch anderweitig zur Fertig­ stellung dieser Arbeit beigetragen haben. Fur die vorliegende Publikation habe ich einen Anhang mit einer Skizze von in unserem Zusammenhang besonders wichtig erscheinenden Aspekten der Theorie der kristallographischen Raumgruppen hinzugefUgt. Ich hoffe, daB er zum Verstiindnis des mathematischen Hintergrunds der historischen Arbeiten des ersten Kapitels beitragt.
Noch hat das Motto “Alles muss kleiner werden” nicht an Faszination verloren. Physikern, Ingenieuren und Medizinern erschließt sich mit der Nanotechnologie eine neue Welt mit faszinierenden Anwendungen. E.L. Wolf, Physik-Professor in Brooklyn, N.Y., schrieb das erste einführende Lehrbuch zu diesem Thema, in dem er die physikalischen Grundlagen ebenso wie die Anwendungsmöglichkeiten der Nanotechnologie diskutiert. Mittlerweile ist es in der 3. Aufl age erschienen und liegt jetzt endlich auch auf Deutsch vor. Dieses Lehrbuch bietet eine einzigartige, in sich geschlossene Einführung in die physikalischen Grundlagen und Konzepte der Nanowissenschaften sowie Anwendungen von Nanosystemen. Das Themenspektrum reicht von Nanosystemen über Quanteneff ekte und sich selbst organisierende Strukturen bis hin zu Rastersondenmethoden. Besonders die Vorstellung von Nanomaschinen für medizinische Anwendungen ist faszinierend, wenn auch bislang noch nicht praktisch umgesetzt. Der dritten Aufl age, auf der diese Übersetzung beruht, wurde ein neuer Abschnitt über Graphen zugefügt. Die Diskussion möglicher Anwendungen in der Energietechnik, Nanoelektronik und Medizin wurde auf neuesten Stand gebracht und wieder aktuelle Beispiele herangezogen, um wichtige Konzepte und Forschungsinstrumente zu illustrieren. Der Autor führt mit diesem Lehrbuch Studenten der Physik, Chemie sowie Ingenieurwissenschaften von den Grundlagen bis auf den Stand der aktuellen Forschung. Die leicht zu lesende Einführung in dieses faszinierende Forschungsgebiet ist geeignet für fortgeschrittene Bachelor- und Masterstudenten mit Vorkenntnissen in Physik und Chemie. Stimmen zur englischen Vorauflage „Zusammenfassend ist festzustellen, dass Edward L. Wolf trotz der reichlich vorhandenen Literatur zur Nanotechnologie ein individuell gestaltetes einführendes Lehrbuch gelungen ist. Es eignet sich – nicht zuletzt dank der enthaltenen Übungsaufgaben – bestens zur Vorlesungsbegleitung für Studierende der Natur- und Ingenieurwissenschaften sowie auch spezieller nanotechnologisch orientierter Studiengänge.“ Physik Journal „... eine sehr kompakte, lesenswerte und gut verständliche Einführung in die Quantenmechanik sowie ihre Auswirkungen auf die Materialwissenschaften ...“ Chemie Ingenieur Technik
Kompakte und vollständige Einführung in die moderne Festkörperphysik. Studierende sollten für die Lektüre Kenntnisse der klassischen Mechanik, Elektrodynamik, Quantenmechanik und Statistischen Physik besitzen, wie sie im Grundkurs Theoretische Physik an deutschsprachigen Universitäten bis zum Ende des 6. Fachsemesters vermittelt werden. Die 3., aktualisierte Auflage erläutert den Formalismus der 2. Quantisierung (Besetzungszahldarstellung), der für die Behandlung von Vielteilchen-Effekten unumgänglich ist. Von den klassischen Gebieten über die Anwendung bis hin zur aktuellen Forschung – zahlreiche Übungsaufgaben und Lösungen helfen beim Lernen.
Geometrische Figuren selber basteln Jeder liebt Überraschungen. In diesem Buch wird der Zauber von Eschers Werk dreidimensional zur Wirkung gebracht. Sie selbst können aus vorgestanzten Bögen wunderschön dekorierte geometrische Figuren basteln. Entdecken Sie die Schönheit von Regelmäßigkeit und Symmetrie, die aus der Kombination von Geometrie und Eschers Bildkunst hervorgeht.

Best Books