This text identifies the territory occupied by cultural geography and the larger network of ideas of which it forms a part. It should be invaluable to students of cultural geography and related disciplines such as cultural studies, anthropology and sociology.
Strabo of Amasia, a Greek geographer of the Augusto-Tiberian period, observed the Roman world of his time. He collected his observations in his magnum opus, the Geography, which he described as a 'Kolossourgia', a colossal statue of a work. This term reflects not only the work's size in seventeen books, but also its multi-faceted nature, composed of many different elements like the detailing on a statue. In this 2005 volume an international team of Strabo scholars explores those details, discussing the cultural, political, historical and geographical questions addressed in the Geography. The collection offers a number of different approaches to the study of Strabo, from traditional literary and historical perspectives to newer material and feminist readings. These diverse themes and approaches inform each other to provide a wide-ranging exploration of Strabo's work, making the book essential reading for students of ancient history and ancient geography.
"The editors of this genuinely brilliant book seem to dare the reader to argue with them from the first page... I would encourage everyone interested in cultural geography, or in the cultural turn within a whole set of human geogrphies, to do likewise." --ANNALS OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHERS "A richly plural and impassioned re-presentation of cultural geography that eschews everything in the way of boundary drawing and fixity. A re-visioning of the field as "a set of engagements with the world," it contains a vibrant atlas of ever shifting possibilities. Throbbing with commitment, and un-disciplined in the most positive sense of that term, it is exactly what a handbook ought to be." --Professor Allan Pred Department of Geography, University of California at Berkeley Ten sections, with a detailed editorial introduction, the Handbook of Cultural Geography presents a comprehensive statement of the relation between the cultural imagination and the geographical imagination. Emphasising the intellectual diversity of the discipline, the Handbook is a textured overview that presents a state-of-the-art assessment of the key questions informing cultural geography, while also looking at resonances between cultural geography and other disciplines.
Doing Cultural Geography is an introduction to cultural geography that integrates theoretical discussion with applied examples. The emphasis throughout is on doing. Recognizing that many undergraduates have difficulty with both theory and methods courses, the text demystifies the ‘theory’ informing cultural geography and encourages students to engage directly with theory in practice. It emphasizes what can be done with humanist, Marxist, poststructuralist, feminist, and postcolonial theory, demonstrating that this is the best way to prompt students to engage with the otherwise daunting theoretical literature.
Demonstrates how McLuhan extended insights derived from advances in physics and artistic experimentation into a theory of acoustic space which he then used to challenge the assumptions of visual space that had been produced through print culture.
First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Understanding Cultural Geography: Places and Traces offers a comprehensive introduction to perhaps the most exciting and challenging area of human geography. By focusing on the notion of ‘place’ as a key means through which culture and identity is grounded, the book showcases the broad range of theories, methods and practices used within the discipline. This book not only introduces the reader to the rich and complex history of cultural geography, but also the key terms on which the discipline is built. From these insights, the book approaches place as an ‘ongoing composition of traces’, highlighting the dynamic and ever-changing nature of the world around us. The second edition has been fully revised and updated to incorporate recent literature and up-to-date case studies. It also adopts a new seven section structure, and benefits from the addition of two new chapters: Place and Mobility, and Place and Language. Through its broad coverage of issues such as age, race, scale, nature, capitalism, and the body, the book provides valuable perspectives into the cultural relationships between people and place. Anderson gives critical insights into these important issues, helping us to understand and engage with the various places that make up our lives. Understanding Cultural Geography is an ideal text for students being introduced to the discipline through either undergraduate or postgraduate degree courses. The book outlines how the theoretical ideas, empirical foci and methodological techniques of cultural geography illuminate and make sense of the places we inhabit and contribute to. This is a timely update on a highly successful text that incorporates a vast foundation of knowledge; an invaluable book for lecturers and students.
Palau is the furthest western island group of the Pacific Islands. The Philippines are to its west about 500 nautical miles away. To the south is the western end of New Guinea. Although these island peoples all have their roots in Southeast Asia, they have lost ties to their ancient homeland. Each has their own set of customs and beliefs and cannot be lumped together. In this cultural geography, youll learn all you ever wanted to know about the Palau Islands, beginning with their discovery in the fifteenth century, to their American takeover in the 1950s, and life there today. The author covers the history, economy, education, government, language, health, religion, and overall environment of the islands. Youll also learn about Palaus complex aboriginal culture and how for thousands of years, it has had a well-established matrilineal society. Village organization ideally consists of ten totemic clans graphically oriented in a system. Explore the majestic beauty and rich history of the Palau Islands with this detailed cultural geography that will make you feel as though youre there in person.
Cultural Geography in Practice provides an innovative and accessible approach to the sources, theories and methods of cultural geography. Written by an international team of prominent cultural geographers, all of whom are experienced researchers, this book is a fully illustrated guide to methodological approaches in cultural geography. In order to demonstrate the practice of cultural geography each chapter combines the following features: ·Practical instruction in using one of the main methods of cultural geography (e.g. interviewing, interpreting texts and visual images, participatory methods) ·An overview of a key area of concern in cultural geography (e.g. the body, national identity, empire, marginality) ·A nuts and bolts description of the actual application of the theories and methods within a piece of research With the addition of boxed definitions of key concepts and descriptions of research projects by students who devised and undertook them, Cultural Geography in Practice is an essential manual of research practice for both undergraduate and graduate geography students.
In London Underground: A Cultural Geography, David Ashford sets out to chart one of the strangest, as well as the most familiar, spaces in London. This book provides a theoretical account of the evolution of an archetypal modern environment. The first to complete that slow process of estrangement from the natural topography initiated by the Industrial Revolution, the London Underground is shown to be what French anthropologist Marc Augé has termed non-lieu - a non-place, like motorway, supermarket or airport lounge, compelled to interpret its relationship to the invisible landscape it traverses through the medium of signs and maps. Surveying an unusually wide variety of material, ranging from the Victorian triple-decker novel, to Modernist art and architecture, to Pop music and graffiti, this cultural geography suggests that the tube-network is a transitional form, linking the alienated spaces of Victorian England to the virtual spaces of our contemporary consumer-capitalism. Recounting the history of the production of this new space, and of the struggles it has generated, London Underground is nothing less than the story of how people have attempted to make a home in the psychopathological spaces of the modern world.
In health care delivery and health care research, basic concepts of cultural behavior are ignored—at a high personal and financial cost—because both fields are dominated by technical solutions and quantitative analysis. They have little use for what is often regarded as irrelevant information. In this wide-ranging book, written for students and non-specialists, Gesler applies cultural geography to health care and shows that throughout the world, in western and developing countries alike, the social sciences can inform the medical sciences nd make them more effective and less expensive.
A Companion to Cultural Geography brings together original contributions from 35 distinguished international scholars to provide a critical overview of this dynamic and influential field of study. Provides accessible overviews of key themes, debates and controversies from a variety of historical and theoretical vantage points Charts significant changes in cultural geography in the twentieth century as well as the principal approaches that currently animate work in the field A valuable resource not just for geographers but also those working in allied fields who wish to get a clear understanding of the contribution geography is making to cross-disciplinary debates
In Search of Ireland argues that Ireland's political problems are created by conflicts and confusions of identity. It brings together a number of distinguished contributors, each of whom examines a particular aspect of Ireland's diverse cultural geography and history. Issues covered include: the changing definitions of Irishness the roles of class and gender in constructing traditional alignments of identity the role of ethnicity in Irish society the invention and imagining of Irish 'place' the political implications of a pluralistic Ireland The contributors demonstrate that many people both inside and outside of Ireland continue to define themselves and their conflicts through simple sectarian stereotypes. The authors argue that politicians and others must reject these outdated either/or representations and accommodate instead the fluidity of Irish identity. James Anderson, University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne S.J. Connolly, Queens's University, Belfast Neville Douglas, Queen's University, Belfast Brian Graham, University of Ulste
This innovative book marks a significant departure from tradition anlayses of the evolution of cultural landscapes and the interpretation of past environments. Maps of Meaning proposes a new agenda for cultural geography, one set squarely in the context of contemporary social and cultural theory. Notions of place and space are explored through the study of elite and popular cultures, gender and sexuality, race, language and ideology. Questioning the ways in which we invest the world with meaning, the book is an introduction to both culture's geographies and the geography of culture.
Covers A Wide Range Of Cultural Concerns Such As-Methodological Statements, Impression Of Culture On Landscape, Cultural Processes And Change, Cultural Traits And Distribution And Cultural Ecology, Has 29 Papers Contributed By Eminent Geographers From Indian And Abroad. Researchers In Cultural Geography, Anthropology, Sociology And History Will Find It Useful.
First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
"Dr. Bhardwaj's in-depth study of the various aspects of the institution of pilgrimage shows that instead of being a simple practice it has been a gigantic phenomenon affecting all aspects of Indian life. . . integrating diverse forces, various cults, and numerous traditions over the ages."--Asian Student "This is the best general survey of a major religion's total pilgrimage system and the best intensive investigation of one of its subsystems. . . . Dr. Bhardwaj's book is an important step towards the recognition of a social phenomenon which has for millennia played a crucial role in the integration of religions, nationalities, and international communities. And, not least importantly, it is highly readable."--Journal of the American Academy of Religion "Detailed, accurate, and generally informative; he has succeeded in tracing, for the first time, the relationship of the rank-order or 'level' of a sacred place. . . to its degree of sanctity, type of deity, and caste and motivation of the pilgrim. . . .The implications of Mr. Bhardwaj's study are profound and necessary to the understanding of Indian religion. . . it is fascinating."--Times Literary Supplement "Here is a fine example of what the geographic study of India needs: disciplined work that shows full awareness of Indian cultural meanings. . . .it sets a worth standard."--Professional Geographer
Drawing upon thirty years work which took him to Madagascar, New Hebrides, Australia and New Caledonia, Joel Bonnemaison's work presents an original and refreshing alternative to the more traditional Anglo-American approach to cultural geography. Bonnemaison provides a true kind of anthro-geography as he explores questions around the geography of culture and the anthropology of space. With an introduction by John Agnew, Department Chair, Dept. of Geography, UCLA._x000D_ _x000D_ ‘Bonnemaison’s perspective is infinitely more interesting than most Anglo-American cultural geography.’ - Professor Mike Hefferman, University of Nottingham_x000D_ _x000D_ ‘A very stimulating introduction to cultural geography.’ - Professor Paul Claval_x000D_ _x000D_ The translation into English of Joel Bonnemaison’s La Geographie Culturelle is a major event. In this gem of a book, Bonnemaison makes a powerful case for an entirely new form of cultural geography that helps us make sense of both Western and non-Western societies. – Mike Heffernan, Nottingham University
The Cultural Geography Reader draws together fifty-two classic and contemporary abridged readings that represent the scope of the discipline and its key concepts. Readings have been selected based on their originality, accessibility and empirical focus, allowing students to grasp the conceptual and theoretical tools of cultural geography through the grounded research of leading scholars in the field. Each of the eight sections begins with an introduction that discusses the key concepts, its history and relation to cultural geography and connections to other disciplines and practices. Six to seven abridged book chapters and journal articles, each with their own focused introductions, are also included in each section. The readability, broad scope, and coverage of both classic and contemporary pieces from the US and UK makes The Cultural Geography Reader relevant and accessible for a broad audience of undergraduate students and graduate students alike. It bridges the different national traditions in the US and UK, as well as introducing the span of classic and contemporary cultural geography. In doing so, it provides the instructor and student with a versatile yet enduring benchmark text.

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