Culture, Health and Illness is the leading international textbook on the role of cultural and social factors in health, illness, and medical care. Since first published in 1984, it has been used in over 40 countries within universities, medical schools and nursing colleges. This new edition meets the ever-growing need for a clear starting point in understanding the clinical significance of cultural and social factors. The book addresses the complex interactions between health, illness and culture by setting out anthropological theory in a highly readable, jargon-free style and integrating this with the practice of health care using real-life examples and case histories. Fully revised throughout, the fifth edition has expanded its coverage of topics that are challenging both the patient and the carer's understanding of health and illness: poverty and inequality of healthcare, genetics, biotechnology, the internet and health, chronic diseases, drug-resistant infections, changes in nutrition and body image, medical care of migrants, medical technology, global pandemics such as AIDS and malaria, drug and alcohol dependence, and patients' 'languages of distress', a complex topic central to the doctor-patient relationship. In today's world of increasing cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of populations, Culture, Health and Illness is essential reading for students of medicine, nursing, psychiatry, public health, health education, international health and medical anthropology, across the globe.
Culture, Health and Illness: An Introduction for Health Professionals covers basic ideas and research in medical anthropology. The book starts by discussing the scope of medical anthropology and the cultural definitions of anatomy and physiology, including the body structure and its functions. The text describes the clinical significance of food in diet and nutrition, social and cultural aspects of medical pluralism and health care. Doctor-patient interactions; social, psychological and cultural factors associated with pain; and non-pharmacological influences of medication, in relation to placebos, psychotropic and narcotic drugs, alcohol, and tobacco are also considered. The book then covers the type of rituals that relate to health and illness and the management of misfortune. The text also encompasses transcultural psychiatry, the cultural aspects of stress, and cultural factors in epidemiology. The selection is useful to health professions (doctors, nurses, midwives, health visitors, medical social workers, and nutritionists); those involved in health education or foreign medical aid; undergraduate students taking up these disciplines; and those studying anthropology or sociology.
An ever-controversial subject, Children's nutrition is eloquently discussed by Gabrielle Palmer, author of The Politics of Breastfeeding, in this brief, compassionate and well-researched book. An invaluable insight into the current politics of complementary feeding.
Implementing Continuity of Care in Breast Feeding emphasizes quality and continuity of care; management issues; and policies and procedures that support breastfeeding in the hospital setting whether in the inpatient maternity, NICU, or ambulatory care.
How Navajos navigate the complex world of medicine Surgery, blood transfusions, CPR, and organ transplantation are common biomedical procedures for treating trauma and disease. But for Navajo Indians, these treatments can conflict with their traditional understanding of health and well-being. This book investigates how Navajos navigate their medically and religiously pluralistic world while coping with illness. Focusing on Navajo attitudes toward invasive procedures, Maureen Trudelle Schwarz reveals the ideological conflicts experienced by Navajo patients and the reasons behind the choices they make to promote their own health and healing. Schwarz has conducted extensive interviews with patients, traditional herbalists and ceremonial practitioners, and members of Native American Church and Christian denominations to reveal the variety of perspectives toward biomedicine that prevail on the reservation and to show how each group within the tribe copes with health-related issues. She describes how Navajos interpret numerous health issues in terms of local understanding, drawing on both their own and biomedical or Christian traditions. She also provides insight into how Navajos use ceremonial practice and prayer to deal with the consequences of amputation or transplantation.
Current public health promotion of breastfeeding relies heavily on health messaging and individual behavior change. Women are told that “breast is best” but too little serious attention is given to addressing the many social, economic, and political factors that combine to limit women’s real choice to breastfeed beyond a few days or weeks. The result: women’s, infants’, and public health interests are undermined. Beyond Health, Beyond Choice examines how feminist perspectives can inform public health support for breastfeeding. Written by authors from diverse disciplines, perspectives, and countries, this collection of essays is arranged thematically and considers breastfeeding in relation to public health and health care; work and family; embodiment (specifically breastfeeding in public); economic and ethnic factors; guilt; violence; and commercialization. By examining women’s experiences and bringing feminist insights to bear on a public issue, the editors attempt to reframe the discussion to better inform public health approaches and political action. Doing so can help us recognize the value of breastfeeding for the public’s health and the important productive and reproductive contributions women make to the world.
This new edition introduces students to the growing field of medical anthropology. It reviews the basic perspectives and concepts and the latest debates in the field in a more comprehensive fashion than many other comparable works.
A Reader in Medical Anthropology: Theoretical Trajectories, Emergent Realities brings together articles from the key theoretical approaches in the field of medical anthropology as well as related science and technology studies. The editors’ comprehensive introductions evaluate the historical lineages of these approaches and their value in addressing critical problems associated with contemporary forms of illness experience and health care. Presents a key selection of both classic and new agenda-setting articles in medical anthropology Provides analytic and historical contextual introductions by leading figures in medical anthropology, medical sociology, and science and technology studies Critically reviews the contribution of medical anthropology to a new global health movement that is reshaping international health agendas
This second edition enables students to improve their communication and interpersonal skills, by way of activities, scenarios and case studies. It is ideal for those who want to improve the quality of care they offer to their patients and service users.
This introductory textbook relates theory to practice and enhances students' learning and understanding of cultural issues that impact on patient care and their own practice as nurses, while considering wider social and political issues. Now in its third edition, Cultural Awareness in Nursing and Health Care has been updated to include new research, evidence and a completely new chapter focusing on the health care workforce itself and the issues it’s facing. Other topics include: Health, illness and religious beliefs; Mental health and culture; Women’s and men’s health in a multicultural society; Caring for the elderly; Death and bereavement. Key features: Includes international perspectives and issues relating to overseas nurses studying and working in the UK; Case studies, reflective exercises, summary boxes and website links designed to stimulate discussion and shared practice; Fully updated with guidelines for practice and education.
Alternative medicine is not a fashionable new trend but an established cultural strategy, as well as a dynamic feature of mainstream contemporary medicine, in which elements of folk traditions are often blended with western scientific approaches. The Anthropology of Alternative Medicine is a concise yet wide-ranging exploration of non-biomedical healing. The book addresses a broad range of practices including: substance, energy and information flows (e.g. helminthic therapy); spirit, consciousness and trance (e.g. shamanism); body, movement and the senses (e.g. reiki and aromatherapy); as well as classical medical traditions as complements or alternatives to Western biomedicine (e.g. Ayurveda). Exploring the cultural underpinnings of contemporary healing methods, while assessing current ideas, topics and resources for further study, this book will be invaluable to undergraduate and graduate students in anthropology, sociology, psychology, and health related professions such as nursing, physical and occupational therapy, and biomedicine.
Forces such as political conflict, globalization and the growth of the internet, offering news of life elsewhere, mean levels of migration are higher now than at any other time in history. Despite the signing of a number of legally binding international treaties that seek to guarantee health care for migrants, there is still a considerable gap between government commitments and the reality of everyday life. As levels of migration continue to increase, it is essential for health care professionals to consider the differing needs of migrants in order to provide them with quality care. Informed by systemic theory, and drawing on the author's extensive clinical – as well as personal – experience, this timely book explores the limited existing information about migrants' health care experiences, and offers recommendations for clinical practice. Providing the reader with an understanding of the ways in which migration informs and is informed by experiences of illness, the book thoroughly examines topics such as: • Links between migration and physical and mental health • Language barriers and prejudice • The effects of migration on feelings of grief and loss • The real challenges of providing effective health care to migrants, as told by a GP working with mostly first or second generation migrants in the UK Providing a comprehensive insight into a worldwide issue, this is an essential guide for health care students, professionals and policy makers.
With over 1000 questions, MCQs and EMQs in Surgery is the ideal self-assessment companion guide to Bailey & Love's Short Practice in Surgery. The book assists readers in their preparation for examinations and to test their knowledge of the principles and practice of surgery as outlined within Bailey & Love. Sub-divided into 13 subject-specific sections, both MCQs and EMQs provide a comprehensive coverage of the surgical curriculum as well as the core learning points as set out in Bailey & Love: Each section emphasises the importance of self-assessment within effective clinical examination and soundly based surgical principles, while while taking into account the latest developments in surgical practice. MCQs and EMQs in Surgery is an excellent companion to Bailey & Love and provides a valuable revision tool for those studying for MRCS.
Using a discipline-by-discipline approach, Linne & Ringsrud's Clinical Laboratory Science: Concepts, Procedures, and Clinical Applications, 7th Edition provides a fundamental overview of the skills and techniques you need to work in a clinical laboratory and perform routine clinical lab tests. Coverage of basic laboratory techniques includes key topics such as safety, measurement techniques, and quality assessment. Clear, straightforward instructions simplify lab procedures, and are described in the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) format. Written by well-known CLS educator Mary Louise Turgeon, this text includes perforated pages so you can easily detach procedure sheets and use them as a reference in the lab! Hands-on procedures guide you through the exact steps you'll perform in the lab. Review questions at the end of each chapter help you assess your understanding and identify areas requiring additional study. A broad scope makes this text an ideal introduction to clinical laboratory science at various levels, including CLS/MT, CLT/MLT, and Medical Assisting, and reflects the taxonomy levels of the CLS/MT and CLT/MLT exams. Detailed full-color illustrations show what you will see under the microscope. An Evolve companion website provides convenient online access to all of the procedures in the text, a glossary, audio glossary, and links to additional information. Case studies include critical thinking and multiple-choice questions, providing the opportunity to apply content to real-life scenarios. Learning objectives help you study more effectively and provide measurable outcomes to achieve by completing the material. Streamlined approach makes it easier to learn the most essential information on individual disciplines in clinical lab science. Experienced author, speaker, and educator Mary Lou Turgeon is well known for providing insight into the rapidly changing field of clinical laboratory science. Convenient glossary makes it easy to look up definitions without having to search through each chapter. NEW! Procedure worksheets have been added to most chapters; perforated pages make it easy for students to remove for use in the lab and for assignment of review questions as homework. NEW! Instrumentation updates show new technology being used in the lab. NEW! Additional key terms in each chapter cover need-to-know terminology. NEW! Additional tables and figures in each chapter clarify clinical lab science concepts.
Making Sense of Critical Appraisal provides all the necessary information on how to read and understand medical research publications critically and to decide whether the contents of such publications are clinically useful in the care of patients.
Praise for the previous edition: Students who desire to become competent in palpation as well as experienced clinicians who seek a strong review of palpation will find this text an excellent learning resource.--Christopher Hughes, PhD, Slippery Rock University This completely updated second edition of Palpation Techniques is a beautifully illustrated guide with clear, step-by-step descriptions that teaches readers how to identify and then distinguish between various body structures. It includes more than 800 full-color photographs of models with detailed drawings of muscles, bones, and tendons sketched directly onto their skin, and complementary color illustrations showing the functional significance of each anatomic region. Key Features of the Second Edition: New palpation techniques for the shoulder New photos and illustrations for the hand, hip, and foot Additional study questions and updated references This revised edition will enable physical therapy and osteopathy practitioners and students to refine their knowledge of anatomy and thus optimize patient care.
Tongzhi, which translates into English as "same purpose" or "same will," was once widely used to mean "comrade." Since the 1990s, the word has been appropriated by the LGBT community in China and now refers to a broad range of people who do not espouse heteronormativity. Tongzhi Living, the first study of its kind, offers insights into the community of same-sex-attracted men in the metropolitan city of Dalian in northeast China. Based on ethnographic fieldwork by Tiantian Zheng, the book reveals an array of coping mechanisms developed by tongzhi men in response to rapid social, cultural, and political transformations in postsocialist China. According to Zheng, unlike gay men in the West over the past three decades, tongzhi men in China have adopted the prevailing moral ideal of heterosexuality and pursued membership in the dominant culture at the same time they have endeavored to establish a tongzhi culture. They are, therefore, caught in a constant tension of embracing and contesting normality as they try to create a new and legitimate space for themselves. Tongzhi men's attempts to practice both conformity and rebellion paradoxically undercut the goals they aspire to reach, Zheng shows, perpetuating social prejudice against them and thwarting the activism they believe they are advocating.
For thousands of years, healers have used plants to cure illness. Aspirin, the world's most widely used drug, is based on compounds originally extracted from the bark of a willow tree, and more than a quarter of medicines found on pharmacy shelves contain plant compounds. Now Western medicine, faced with health crises such as AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer, has begun to look to the healing plants used by indigenous peoples to develop powerful new medicines. Nowhere is the search more promising than in the Amazon, the world's largest tropical forest, home to a quarter of all botanical species on this planet—as well as hundreds of Indian tribes whose medicinal plants have never been studied by Western scientists. In Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice, ethnobotanist Mark J. Plotkin recounts his travels and studies with some of the most powerful Amazonian shamans, who taught him the plant lore their tribes have spent thousands of years gleaning from the rain forest. For more than a decade, Dr. Plotkin has raced against time to harvest and record new plants before the rain forests' fragile ecosystems succumb to overdevelopment—and before the Indians abandon their own culture and learning for the seductive appeal of Western material culture. Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice relates nine of the author's quests, taking the reader along on a wild odyssey as he participates in healing rituals; discovers the secret of curare, the lethal arrow poison that kills in minutes; tries the hallucinogenic snuff epena that enables the Indians to speak with their spirit world; and earns the respect and fellowship of the mysterious shamans as he proves that he shares both their endurance and their reverence for the rain forest. Mark Plotkin combines the Darwinian spirit of the great writer-explorers of the nineteenth century—curious, discursive, and rigorously scientific—with a very modern concern for the erosion of our environment and the vanishing culture of native peoples.
Drug therapy is an increasingly important element in the treatment of patients, and understanding how a drug works is essential for all nurses. Illustrated Pharmacology for Nurses is a fully comprehensive and beautifully illustrated textbook covering both the basic principles and the clinical aspects of pharmacology. The book provides clear and simple explanations of the way drugs act, looking at their effects and their use in a range of situations. Combining the basic and clinical aspects of pharmacology in one concise volume, it is an invaluable learning tool for nursing, biomedical and clinical science students.

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