Curt Flood in the Media examines the public discourse surrounding Curt Flood (1938-1997), the star center fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals throughout the sixties. In 1969, Flood was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies. At the time, all Major League Baseball players were subject to the reserve clause, which essentially bound a player to work in perpetuity for his original team, unless traded for another player or sold for cash, in which case he worked under the same reserve conditions for the next team. Flood refused the trade on a matter of principle, arguing that Major League Baseball had violated both U.S. antitrust laws and the 13th Amendment’s prohibition of involuntary servitude. In a defiant letter to Commissioner Bowie Kuhn asking for his contractual release, Flood infamously wrote, “after twelve years in the major leagues, I do not feel that I am a piece of property to be bought and sold irrespective of my wishes.” Most significantly, Flood appeared on national television with Howard Cosell and described himself as a “well-paid slave.” Explosive controversy ensued. Khan examines the ways in which the media constructed the case and Flood’s persona. By examining the mainstream press, the black press, and primary sources including Flood’s autobiography, Khan exposes the complexities of what it means to be a prominent black American athlete-in 1969 and today.
This volume of essays examines the ways in which sports have become a means for the communication of social identity in the United States. The essays included here explore the question, How is identity engaged in the performance and spectatorship of sports? Defining sports as the whole range of mediated professional sports, and considering actual participation in sports, the chapters herein address a varied range of ways in which sports as a cultural entity becomes a site for the creation and management of symbolic components of identity. Originating in the New Agendas in Communication symposium sponsored by the University of Texas College of Communication, this volume provides contemporary explorations of sports and identity, highlighting the perspectives of up-and-coming scholars and researchers. It has much to offer readers in communication, sociology of sport, human kinetics, and related areas.
From Major League Baseball's inception in the 1880s through World War II, team owners enjoyed monopolistic control of the industry. Despite the players' desire to form a viable union, every attempt to do so failed. The labor consciousness of baseball players lagged behind that of workers in other industries, and the public was largely in the dark about labor practices in baseball. In the mid-1960s, star players Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale staged a joint holdout for multiyear contracts and much higher salaries. Their holdout quickly drew support from the public; for the first time, owners realized they could ill afford to alienate fans, their primary source of revenue. Baseball's Power Shift chronicles the growth and development of the union movement in Major League Baseball and the key role of the press and public opinion in the players' successes and failures in labor-management relations. Swanson focuses on the most turbulent years, 1966 to 1981, which saw the birth of the Major League Baseball Players Association as well as three strikes, two lockouts, Curt Flood's challenge to the reserve clause in the Supreme Court, and the emergence of full free agency. To defeat the owners, the players' union needed support from the press, and perhaps more importantly, the public. With the public on their side, the players ushered in a new era in professional sports when salaries skyrocketed and fans began to care as much about the business dealings of their favorite team as they do about wins and losses. Swanson shows how fans and the media became key players in baseball's labor wars and paved the way for the explosive growth in the American sports economy.
After the 1969 season, the St. Louis Cardinals traded their star center fielder, Curt Flood, to the Philadelphia Phillies, setting off a chain of events that would change professional sports forever. At the time there were no free agents, no no-trade clauses. When a player was traded, he had to report to his new team or retire. Unwilling to leave St. Louis and influenced by the civil rights movement, Flood chose to sue Major League Baseball for his freedom. His case reached the Supreme Court, where Flood ultimately lost. But by challenging the system, he created an atmosphere in which, just three years later, free agency became a reality. Flood’s decision cost him his career, but as this dramatic chronicle makes clear, his influence on sports history puts him in a league with Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali.
"A collection of essays about the intersection of sports, race, and the media in the 20th century and beyond"--
The heart of professional baseball, if not its roots, may be found in the American Midwest, especially in Missouri. In Seasons in the Sun, Roger D. Launius offers an excellent overview of the teams, pennant races, trials, and triumphs of the different major-league teams that have resided in the state over the years. Since 1876, when St. Louis became a charter member of the newly formed National League, there have also been other major-league franchises from less well known leagues in St. Louis. The St. Louis major-league baseball experience is not limited to the extraordinary success and fame of the Cardinals, who have won more World Series championships than any other National League team. St. Louis also claims the excellent but short-lived Brown Stockings, the city's first entry into the National League; the American League's Browns, who spent most of their existence in the first half of the twentieth century at the bottom of the standings; the virtually forgotten Terriers of the Federal League in 1914-1915; and the Maroons of the pre-twentieth-century National League.
“You don’t have to be a Yankees fan to love Yankee Miracles.”—Yogi Berra If it was not all so true, you’d think it was a fairy tale. A seventeen-year-old from Queens spray paints graffiti on Yankee Stadium and gets nabbed by George Steinbrenner himself. Contrary to his gruff public image, the Boss—driven by a compassionate inner voice—reclaims the teen at a time when the Bronx is literally burning. Thus begins the unlikeliest of baseball stories, one in which Ray Negron is transformed from street kid to batboy and beyond. Befriending many of major league baseball’s greatest stars—Billy Martin, Reggie Jackson, Munson, Mantle, Catfish, A-Rod, Jeter, even Mrs. Lou Gehrig—Negron ultimately emerges as a dynamic community leader, dedicating his own life to helping the sick and rescuing generations of city kids from unfulfilled lives. Yankee Miracles is a book about the power of baseball to transform lives, about all those miracles on 161st Street we never knew were there.
This is the first full-length biography of the lawyer-turned-sports journalist whose brash style and penchant for social commentary changed the way American sporting events are reported. Perhaps best known for his close relationship with the world champion boxer Muhammad Ali, Howard Cosell became a celebrity in his own right during the 1960s and 1970s -- the bombastic, controversial, instantly recognizable sportscaster everyone "loved to hate." Raised in Brooklyn in a middle-class Jewish family, Cosell carried with him a deeply ingrained sense of social justice. Yet early on he abandoned plans for a legal career to become a pioneer in sports broadcasting, first in radio and then in television. While Cosell took courageous stands on behalf of civil rights and other causes, he could be remarkably blind to the inconsistencies in his own life. In this way, John Bloom argues, he embodied contradictions that still resonate widely in American society today.
Following upon the success of the The Great Philadelphia Fan Book. Glen Macnow and Philadelphia's No. 1 sports-talk personality-Angelo Cataldi-have combined to give us The Great Philadelphia Sports Debate. It's sure to strike another nerve with Philadelphia's sports fans; the most loyal, long suffering, vociferous, in-the-blood, in your face sports fan in America! This time, Glen and Angelo get smack-dab in the middle of the controversies that always abound when sports fans get together. Whether it be in the taproom, or in the living room watching their favorite sport on TV. Who's the best this? What was the greatest that? These debates have been with us as long as sports have been played, and will continue to be.
"With detail and analysis, Korr reveals how the union operated, how the players financed and supported it, and how it succeeded in besting the owners in every confrontation. He also considers the role of the press in swaying public opinion of both sides and captures the ideological rift between fans and owners, who were enmeshed in the romantic traditionalism of baseball's history, and the players who were unwilling to accept the status quo."--BOOK JACKET.
The complexity of baseball player Curt Flood's decision to challenge baseball's reserve system is examined in this account of an eloquent man who was neither a hero nor a martyr, but who became a victim of unique circumstances and his own life.
The game of baseball has often resulted in brawls, both on the field and in the courtroom, and from the 1890's on, much of what baseball is today has been shaped by the law. In eighteen chapters, this eye-opening book discusses cases that involved rules of the game, new stadium construction, ownership of baseball memorabilia, injured spectators, television contracts, and much more.
Londons größter lebender Chronist über die »gay history« seiner Stadt Das römische Londinium war übersät mit »Wolfshöhlen«, Bordellen und heißen Bädern, in denen es hoch herging. Homosexualität galt als bewundernswert. Bis Kaiser Konstantin die Macht übernahm und mit seinen Mönchen und Missionaren für Ordnung sorgte. Zeiten der Toleranz wechselten mit Zeiten der Ächtung und Verfolgung. Heute gehört »queer London« zur britischen Hauptstadt wie Tower und Big Ben. Londons homosexuelle Szene ist die größte in Europa und eine der größten weltweit. Peter Ackroyd zeigt uns, wie seine Stadt sich diesen Platz erkämpft hat. Er zelebriert die Vielfältigkeit und Energie der Community, zeigt aber auch die Gefährdungen, denen sie zu allen Zeiten ausgesetzt war. »Ein absolut einzigartiges Leseerlebnis.« The Independent
It has been said that sport is the great leveler, that on the playing field everyone is of equal status. Through the years, however, few institutions have better embodied America's ideals and prejudices than baseball. Jackie Robinson's debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers marked the first time an African American participated in a major league contest in the 20th century, and his abilities verified what many had believed all along--that African Americans could compete with white players and excel. The experiences and important contributions of six African American baseball players from the 1900s to the present day are presented in this work. The players are Andrew "Rube" Foster, perhaps the most important figure in black baseball during the first quarter of the 20th century; Satchel Paige, whose talent quickly became known in organized baseball and was built into a near mythical figure by an enchanted press; Larry Doby, who took the field with the Cleveland Indians three months after Jackie Robinson appeared with the Dodgers; Curt Flood, remembered less for the exceptional player he was than for challenging baseball's reserve clause; Dave Parker, the first black player to make a million dollars a year but also a prominent witness to the Pittsburgh drug trial; and Barry Bonds, known for his clashes with fans and the media but most recently revered for his MVP season in 2002 and record-breaking 73 home runs in 2001.
This anthology gathers selected papers from the 2006 and 2007 meetings of the Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture, the long-running academic conference held annually at the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Essays in the first of the volume's six sections, "The African American Experience," examine Negro League playing styles as cultural expression, media coverage of Curt Flood's battle against MLB, and autobiographical accounts by Flood and Jackie Robinson that recall slave-narrative tradition. In "The Women's Game" the legacy of Title IX is explored, along with gender constructions at the time of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Teams and their towns are the focus of "Baseball and Community"; essays deal with Dodgertown and Vero Beach, baseball and advertising in Brooklyn, and the baseball identity of a mining town in New Mexico. In "Baseball Ideology" the game's films, wartime rhetoric, and the approaches to its ethnic history are investigated. Essays in "Biography: Baseball Lives" relate the true stories of a Depression-era felon treated to a World Series game at Wrigley and the post-Katrina struggles of pitching great Mel Parnell. Finally, in "The Business of Baseball," essayists gauge the effects of the recent steroids scandal, three decades of free agency, and MLB's new global perspective.
With contributions by Prosper Godonoo, Urla Hill, C. Richard King, David J. Leonard, Jack Lule, Murry Nelson, David C. Ogden, Robert W. Reising, and Joel Nathan Rosen Reconstructing Fame: Sport, Race, and Evolving Reputations includes essays on Jackie Robinson, Roberto Clemente, Curt Flood, Paul Robeson, Jim Thorpe, Bill Russell, Tommie Smith, and John Carlos. The essayists in this volume write about twentieth-century athletes whose careers were affected by racism and whose post-career reputations have improved as society's understanding of race changed. Contributors attempt to clarify the stories of these sports stars and their places as twentieth-century icons by analyzing the various myths that surround them. When media, fans, sports leagues, and the athletes themselves commemorate sports legends, shifts in popular perceptions often serve to obscure an athlete's role in history. Such revisions can lack coherence and trivialize the efforts of some legendary competitors and those associated with them. Adding racial tensions to this process further complicates the task of preserving the valuable achievements of key players.
This new look at all-star center fielder Curt Flood's efforts to shake the foundations of major league baseball reminds readers that Flood holds a unique and important place in both baseball and American law as the player who challenged baseball's reserve clause and championed the cause of free agency. Simultaneous.
A baseball strike puts one of the sport’s star players in the hospital—and agent Dave Bolt on the hunt for his assailant. When baseball's biggest rising star, Willie Hesketh, declares he is going to cross the picket line to play the game he loves, someone doesn't agree. Before Willie even has a chance to arrive at the battle, four thugs with bats waylay him. Now Willie is laid up in the hospital with a slim chance of walking again. All he knows is that he believes he put out the eye of one of the goons and he begs Dave Bolt to get revenge. It is a twisty road through the maze of managers, union leaders and players, but sports agent Bolt has a map . . . one that leads straight to a one-eyed man.
Das literarische Abenteuer aus Norwegen, das autobiographische Projekt von Karl Ove Knausgård geht weiter: Nach Sterben und Lieben nun Spielen – ein Roman über eine Kindheit, der eine Welt beschreibt, in der Kinder und Erwachsene parallele Leben führen, die sich nie begegnen. Alles beginnt mit einer traditionellen Familie: Vater, Mutter und zwei Jungen, die nach Südnorwegen ziehen, in ein neues Haus in einer neuen Siedlung. Es sind die frühen Siebzigerjahre, die Kinder sind klein, die Eltern jung, die Zukunft scheint offen und verheißungsvoll. Aber irgendwann beginnt sie sich zu schließen, irgendwann wird das, was mit großen Hoffnungen begann, klein und festgelegt. Was ist passiert? Wie konnte es dazu kommen? »An einem milden und bewölkten Tag im August 1969 fuhr auf einer schmalen Straße am äußeren Ende einer südnorwegischen Insel, zwischen Wiesen und Felsen, Weiden und Wäldchen, ein Bus. Er gehörte der Arendal-Dampfschifffahrtsgesellschaft und war wie alle Busse des Unternehmens hell- und dunkelbraun. Er fuhr über eine Brücke, an einer schmalen Bucht entlang, blinkte rechts und hielt. Die Tür ging auf, eine kleine Familie stieg aus. Der Vater, ein großer und schlanker Mann in einem weißen Hemd und einer hellen Polyesterhose, trug zwei Koffer. Die Mutter, in einem beigen Mantel und mit einem hellblauen Kopftuch, das um die langen Haare geschlungen war, hielt an der einen Hand einen Kinderwagen und an der anderen einen kleinen Jungen. Als der Bus weitergefahren war, hing seine dicke, graue Abgaswolke noch für einen Moment über dem Asphalt.«

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