This book creates a framework for understanding and using cyberpower in support of national security. Cyberspace and cyberpower are now critical elements of international security. United States needs a national policy which employs cyberpower to support its national security interests.
In a very short time, individuals and companies have harnessed cyberspace to create new industries, a vibrant social space, and a new economic sphere that are intertwined with our everyday lives. At the same time, individuals, subnational groups, and governments are using cyberspace to advance interests through malicious activity. Terrorists recruit, train, and target through the Internet, hackers steal data, and intelligence services conduct espionage. Still, the vast majority of cyberspace is civilian space used by individuals, businesses, and governments for legitimate purposes. Cyberspace and National Security brings together scholars, policy analysts, and information technology executives to examine current and future threats to cyberspace. They discuss various approaches to advance and defend national interests, contrast the US approach with European, Russian, and Chinese approaches, and offer new ways and means to defend interests in cyberspace and develop offensive capabilities to compete there. Policymakers and strategists will find this book to be an invaluable resource in their efforts to ensure national security and answer concerns about future cyberwarfare.
The 11thInternational Conference on Cyber Warfare and Security (ICCWS 2016) is being held at Boston University, Boston, USA on the 17-18th March 2016. The Conference Chair is Dr Tanya Zlateva and the Programme Chair is Professor Virginia Greiman, both from Boston University. ICCWS is a recognised Cyber Security event on the International research conferences calendar and provides a valuable platform for individuals to present their research findings, display their work in progress and discuss conceptual and empirical advances in the area of Cyber Warfare and Cyber Security. It provides an important opportunity for researchers and managers to come together with peers to share their experiences of using the varied and expanding range of Cyberwar and Cyber Security research available to them. The keynote speakers for the conference are Daryl Haegley from the Department of Defense (DoD), who will address the topic Control Systems Networks...What's in Your Building? and Neal Ziring from the National Security Agency who will be providing some insight to the issue of Is Security Achievable? A Practical Perspective. ICCWS received 125 abstract submissions this year. After the double blind, peer review process there are 43 Academic Research Papers 8 PhD papers Research papers, 7 Masters and 1 work-in-progress papers published in these Conference Proceedings. These papers represent work from around the world, including: Australia, Canada, China, Czech Republic, District of Columbia, Finland, France, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Netherlands, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, UK, USA.
​Der Cyberspace gilt als Domäne der Gesellschaftswelt. Kleine Hackergruppen führen „Cyberkriege“, „Cyberdissidenten“ machen „Revolutionen“ und „virtuelle Gemeinschaften“ transzendieren die politische Geographie. Mischa Hansel relativiert derlei radikale Transformationserwartungen und macht für den tatsächlichen Einflussverlust der Staaten vor allem deren mangelnde Kooperationsbereitschaft verantwortlich. Am Beispiel der Cybersicherheit wendet der Autor neo-realistische, neo-institutionalistische und psychologische Ansätze auf die Problematik der zwischenstaatlichen Kooperation im Cyberspace an.
During the course of nearly two years, the Center for Technology and National Security Policy (CTNSP), National Defense University (NDU), has conducted extensive research to identify and explore major cyber issues. These activities were performed in response to a request in the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). The result of that research is documented in a book entitled Cyberpower and National Security.
Conflict and Cooperation in Cyberspace: The Challenge to National Security brings together some of the world’s most distinguished military leaders, scholars, cyber operators, and policymakers in a discussion of current and future challenges that cyberspace poses to the United States and the world. Maintaining a focus on policy-relevant solutions, it offers a well-reasoned study of how to prepare for war, while attempting to keep the peace in the cyberspace domain. The discussion begins with thoughtful contributions concerning the attributes and importance of cyberspace to the American way of life and global prosperity. Examining the truths and myths behind recent headline-grabbing malicious cyber activity, the book spells out the challenges involved with establishing a robust system of monitoring, controls, and sanctions to ensure cooperation amongst all stakeholders. The desire is to create a domain that functions as a trusted and resilient environment that fosters cooperation, collaboration, and commerce. Additionally, the book: Delves into the intricacies and considerations cyber strategists must contemplate before engaging in cyber war Offers a framework for determining the best ways to engage other nations in promoting global norms of behavior Illustrates technologies that can enable cyber arms control agreements Dispels myths surrounding Stuxnet and industrial control systems General Michael V. Hayden, former director of the National Security Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency, begins by explaining why the policymakers, particularly those working on cyber issues, must come to understand the policy implications of a dynamic domain. Expert contributors from the Air Force Research Institute, MIT, the Rand Corporation, Naval Postgraduate School, NSA, USAF, USMC, and others examine the challenges involved with ensuring improved cyber security. Outlining the larger ethical, legal, and policy challenges facing government, the private sector, civil society, and individual users, the book offers plausible solutions on how to create an environment where there is confidence in the ability to assure national security, conduct military operations, and ensure a vibrant and stable global economy.
Most books on cybercrime are written by national security or political experts, and rarely propose an integrated and comprehensive approach to cybercrime, cyber-terrorism, cyber-war and cyber-security. This work develops approaches to crucial cyber-security issues that are non-political, non-partisan, and non-governmental. It informs readers through high-level summaries and the presentation of a consistent approach to several cyber-risk related domains, both from a civilian and a military perspective. Explaining fundamental principles in an interdisciplinary manner, it sheds light on the societal, economic, political, military, and technical issues related to the use and misuse of information and communication technologies.
Increasingly, the power of a large, complex, wired nation like the United States rests on its ability to disrupt would-be cyber attacks and to be resilient against a successful attack or recurring campaign. Addressing the concerns of both theorists and those on the national security front lines, Chris C. Demchak presents a unified strategy for survival in an interconnected, ever-messier, more surprising cybered world and examines the institutional adaptations required of our defense, intelligence, energy, and other critical sectors for national security. Demchak introduces a strategy of "security resilience" against surprise attacks for a cybered world that is divided between modern, digitally vulnerable city-states and more dysfunctional global regions. Its key concepts build on theories of international relations, complexity in social-technical systems, and organizational-institutional adaptation. Demchak tests the strategy for reasonableness in history's few examples of states disrupting rather than conquering and being resilient to attacks, including ancient Athens and Sparta, several British colonial wars, and two American limited wars. She applies the strategy to modern political, social, and technical challenges and presents three kinds of institutional adaptation that predicate the success of the security resilience strategy in response. Finally, Demchak discusses implications for the future including new forms of cyber aggression like the Stuxnet worm, the rise of the cyber-command concept, and the competition between the U.S. and China as global cyber leaders. Wars of Disruption and Resilience offers a blueprint for a national cyber-power strategy that is long in time horizon, flexible in target and scale, and practical enough to maintain the security of a digitized nation facing violent cybered conflict.
As the United States struggled to survive the recent recession, China quietly acquired a vast amount of U.S. Treasury bills and bonds. With China now holding so much of America’s debt, currency valuation issues have already caused tensions between the two superpowers. Couple this with Iran’s efforts to develop into a nuclear power in an area that lacks political stability, and the United States and China could soon find themselves in a global power tug-of-war. Power, National Security, and Transformational Global Events: Challenges Confronting America, China, and Iran explores the shifts in power that have initiated major transformational events around the world. Expert contributors identify the major challenges that now confront America as a result of these transformations. Filled with authoritative insights into how current and emerging situations will impact the United States, the book illustrates the policy problems and limited choices facing America. It also: Describes the information technology and social media tools that were instrumental in the Arab revolution Provides the insights of experts from the Intelligence Community on emerging issues that will soon impact America Illustrates the policy problems involved in addressing the challenges with Iran Explores the rapid growth of China’s economic wealth and military power This much-needed reference describes and analyzes the emergence of cyber power and its capabilities for cyber attack, cyber warfare, and cyber defense. It examines the information revolution and social media instruments, such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, in terms of their role and impact on the Arab revolution. It also discusses the fallacy of the decline of the United States as a superpower in terms of its formation and distribution of power resources and its continued formidable military and national security strengths.
The Annual (ICGS) International Conference is an established platform in which se- rity, safety and sustainability issues can be examined from several global perspectives through dialogue between academics, students, government representatives, chief executives, security professionals, and research scientists from the United Kingdom and from around the globe. The 2009 two-day conference focused on the challenges of complexity, rapid pace of change and risk/opportunity issues associated with modern products, systems, s- cial events and infrastructures. The importance of adopting systematic and systemic approaches to the assurance of these systems was emphasized within a special stream focused on strategic frameworks, architectures and human factors. The conference provided an opportunity for systems scientists, assurance researchers, owners, ope- tors and maintainers of large, complex and advanced systems and infrastructures to update their knowledge with the state of best practice in these challenging domains while networking with the leading researchers and solution providers. ICGS3 2009 received paper submissions from more than 20 different countries around the world. Only 28 papers were selected and were presented as full papers. The program also included three keynote lectures by leading researchers, security professionals and government representatives. June 2009 Hamid Jahankhani Ali Hessami Feng Hsu
A generation ago, "cyberspace" was just a term from science fiction, used to describe the nascent network of computers linking a few university labs. Today, our entire modern way of life, from communication to commerce to conflict, fundamentally depends on the Internet. And the cybersecurity issues that result challenge literally everyone: politicians wrestling with everything from cybercrime to online freedom; generals protecting the nation from new forms of attack, while planning new cyberwars; business executives defending firms from once unimaginable threats, and looking to make money off of them; lawyers and ethicists building new frameworks for right and wrong. Most of all, cybersecurity issues affect us as individuals. We face new questions in everything from our rights and responsibilities as citizens of both the online and real world to simply how to protect ourselves and our families from a new type of danger. And yet, there is perhaps no issue that has grown so important, so quickly, and that touches so many, that remains so poorly understood. In Cybersecurity and CyberWar: What Everyone Needs to Know®, New York Times best-selling author P. W. Singer and noted cyber expert Allan Friedman team up to provide the kind of easy-to-read, yet deeply informative resource book that has been missing on this crucial issue of 21st century life. Written in a lively, accessible style, filled with engaging stories and illustrative anecdotes, the book is structured around the key question areas of cyberspace and its security: how it all works, why it all matters, and what can we do? Along the way, they take readers on a tour of the important (and entertaining) issues and characters of cybersecurity, from the "Anonymous" hacker group and the Stuxnet computer virus to the new cyber units of the Chinese and U.S. militaries. Cybersecurity and CyberWar: What Everyone Needs to Know® is the definitive account on the subject for us all, which comes not a moment too soon. What Everyone Needs to Know® is a registered trademark of Oxford University Press.
This paper analyses the UK's approach to identifying and managing threats to the national security of the UK, and the implications for these arrangements of a vote for independence. It complements analysis of the UK's approach to defence explored elsewhere in the Scotland analysis series. It is clearly in the UK's interests to be surrounded by secure and resilient neighbouring countries, including - in the event of a yes vote - an independent Scottish state. While the UK endeavours to work with other countries and international organisations to improve security and fight organised crime for everyone's mutual benefit there is something qualitatively different about being influential and intimately connected with the rest of the UK by being a part of it. Issues of national security are of the utmost sensitivity, linked to a country's foreign, security and defence policy posture, and any decisions are closely related to matters of sovereignty and democratic accountability. For this reason, a security union is closely connected to the existence of a political union. The creation of an independent Scottish state would see an end to the current arrangements for ensuring Scotland's security, as Scotland, including Police Scotland, would no longer be part of the UK's national security infrastructure and capabilities. In practical terms this means that the present level of strategic and operational communication and co-ordination that occurs everyday across the UK, with Scotland playing a key role within it - whether concerned with counter-terrorism, fighting serious and organised crime or protecting against cyber threats - would end

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