When Charles Darwin finished The Origin of Species, he thought that he had explained every clue, but one. Though his theory could explain many facts, Darwin knew that there was a significant event in the history of life that his theory did not explain. During this event, the “Cambrian explosion,” many animals suddenly appeared in the fossil record without apparent ancestors in earlier layers of rock. In Darwin’s Doubt, Stephen C. Meyer tells the story of the mystery surrounding this explosion of animal life—a mystery that has intensified, not only because the expected ancestors of these animals have not been found, but because scientists have learned more about what it takes to construct an animal. During the last half century, biologists have come to appreciate the central importance of biological information—stored in DNA and elsewhere in cells—to building animal forms. Expanding on the compelling case he presented in his last book, Signature in the Cell, Meyer argues that the origin of this information, as well as other mysterious features of the Cambrian event, are best explained by intelligent design, rather than purely undirected evolutionary processes.
In 2013 Stephen Meyer's book "Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design" became a national bestseller, provoking a wide-ranging debate about the adequacy of Darwinian theory to explain life's history. In "Debating Darwin's Doubt: A Scientific Controversy that Can No Longer Be Denied," leading scholars in the intelligent design community respond to critiques of Meyer's book and show that the core challenge posed by Meyer remains unanswered: Where did the influx of information essential to the creation of new body plans come from? In addition to ten chapters by Stephen Meyer, "Debating Darwin's Doubt" also includes contributions from biologists Richard Sternberg, Douglas Axe, and Ann Gauger; philosopher of biology Paul Nelson; mathematicians William Dembski and David Berlinski; and Center for Science and Culture research coordinator Casey Luskin. In forty-four chapters, these contributing authors explore topics such as orphan genes, cladistics, small shelly fossils, protein evolution, the length of the Cambrian explosion, the God-of-the-Gaps objection to intelligent design, and criticisms raised by proponents of theistic evolution. Anyone who wants to understand the cutting-edge of current scientific debates over modern Darwinian theory needs to read this book.
Almost a decade ago, Alvin Plantinga articulated his bold and controversial evolutionary argument against naturalism. This intriguing line of argument raises issues of importance to epistemologists and to philosophers of mind, of religion, and of science. In this, the first book to address the ongoing debate, Plantinga presents his influential thesis and responds to critiques by distinguished philosophers from a variety of subfields. Plantinga's argument is aimed at metaphysical naturalism or roughly the view that no supernatural beings exist. Naturalism is typically conjoined with evolution as an explanation of the existence and diversity of life. Plantinga's claim is that one who holds to the truth of both naturalism and evolution is irrational in doing so. More specifically, because the probability that unguided evolution would have produced reliable cognitive faculties is either low or inscrutable, one who holds both naturalism and evolution acquires a "defeater" for every belief he/she holds, including the beliefs associated with naturalism and evolution. Following Plantinga's brief summary of his thesis are eleven original pieces by his critics. The book concludes with a new essay by Plantinga in which he defends and extends his view that metaphysical naturalism is self-defeating.
In this companion volume to Warrant: The Current Debate, Alvin Plantinga develops an original approach to the question of epistemic warrant; that is what turns true belief into knowledge. He argues that what is crucial to warrant is the proper functioning of one's cognitive faculties in the right kind of cognitive environment. Although this book is in some sense a sequel to its companion volume, the arguments do not presuppose those of the first book and it stands alone as a stimulating contribution to epistemology.
An anthology of essential writings that cover some of the most influential ideas about the philosophical implications of Darwinism, since the publication of "On the Origin of Species".
An engaging collection of interdisciplinary essays on the distinctive qualities of America's textual engagement with Darwinian evolutionary theory, especially in regard to On the Origin of Species, which highlights the influence of prevalent cultural anxieties on interpretation.
Do You Truly Understand Your Faith? Can You Defend It? Scripture calls every believer—including you—to be prepared to defend the faith (1 Peter 3:15)? From the preacher to the churchgoer, the teacher to the student, The Harvest Handbook™of Apologetics is the comprehensive resource all believers need in a world full of uncertainty and relentless criticism. This collection of well-reasoned, Scripture-based essays comes from respected Christian apologists and Bible scholars, including... Norman L. Geisler Josh McDowell Gary R. Habermas Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. Ron Rhodes Edwin M. Yamauchi John Warwick Montgomery William A. Dembski Randy Alcorn Stephen C. Meyer Randall Price Ed Hindson What is the evidence for Jesus's existence? How can you address the seeming contradictions in the Bible? How can you best explain the relationship between science and faith? You'll discover concise and convincing responses to these questions and many more. Defending your faith is a lifelong quest, and this handbook is the perfect guide to help you skillfully answer the topics people ask about. Prepare to "contend for the faith" you call your own (Jude 3)—and become equipped to evangelize with wisdom and passion.
Upon publication, Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species excited much debate and controversy, challenging the foundations of Christianity, nonetheless underpinning the Victorian concept of progress. It still evokes powerful and contradictory responses today. Peter Bowler's study of Darwin's life, first published in 1990, combines biography and cultural history. Emphasizing in particular the impact of Darwin's work, he shows how Darwin's contemporaries were unable to appreciate precisely those aspects of his thinking that are considered scientifically important today. He also demonstrates that Darwin was a product of his time, but he also transcended it by creating an idea capable of being exploited by twentieth-century scientists and intellectuals who had very different values from his own.
If you think atheists have reason, evidence, and science on their side, think again! Award-winning author Dr. Frank Turek (I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist) will show you how atheists steal reason, evidence, science, and other arguments from God in trying to make their case for atheism. If that sounds contradictory, it’s because it is! Atheists can’t make their case without appealing to realities only theism can explain. In an engaging and memorable way, Stealing from God exposes these intellectual crimes atheists are committing and then provides four powerful reasons for why Christianity is true.
Noted biologist and philosopher Sahotra Sarkar exposes the frauds and fallacies of Intelligent Design Theory, and its claim to be ‘good science’. A scientific and philosophical exploration of the debate between evolutionary theory and Intelligent Design in the classroom Puts the debate into its scientific and historical context Looks at a variety of topics, including the relation between Darwinism and modern evolutionary theory, the use of computer science and information theory by the creationists, and the idea of metaphysical naturalism Rejects Intelligent Design’s claim to legitimacy, showing clearly how and why it is an unsuitable alternative to evolutionary biology in the classroom A thought-provoking book for those seeking to understand an intellectual debate that is shaping our education policies Forms part of the provocative and timely Blackwell Public Philosophy series
Offers a new appreciation of Darwin as a religion thinker and a better understanding of his positive contributions to the study of religion.
Despite the crucial role played by translation in the history of scientific ideas and the transmission of knowledge, historians of science have seldom been interested in the translation activity which enabled the spread of those ideas and exerted influence on structures and systems of knowledge. Translation scholars, too, have traditionally shown little interest in theorizing scientific translation. Recent conceptualizations of science as public culture, institution, narrative and rhetorical practice open the way for research on the translation of science to take conceptual and methodological inspiration from studies of discourse, rhetoric, the sociology of science, the history of science, the philosophy of science and other related fields. This special issue of The Translator foregrounds the work of researchers, within or on the periphery of translation studies, who have begun to interrogate the representation of scientific knowledge through translation. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines and models, contributors engage with different perspectives and approaches to help promote the visibility of scientific translation and shed light on its complex relationship with power and the construction of knowledge. Contributors: Brecht Algoet, Karen Bennett, Lidia Camara, Eva Espasa, Lieve Jooken, Monika Krein-Kühle, Min-Hsiu Liao, Ruselle Meade, Guy Rooryck, Dolores Sánchez, Hala Sharkas, Mark Shuttleworth, Richard Somerset, Liselotte Vandenbussche , Sonia Vandepitte
During their lifetimes, Wallace and Darwin shared credit and fame for the independent and near-simultaneous discovery of natural selection. Their rivalry, usually amicable but occasionally acrimonious, forged modern evolutionary theory. Yet today, few people today know much about Wallace. This book explores the controversial life and scientific contributions of the Victorian traveler, scientist and spiritualist. His twelve years of often harrowing travels in the western and eastern tropics place him in the pantheon of the greatest explorer-naturalists of the nineteenth century. Tracing his discovery of natural selection, the book then follows the remaining fifty years of Wallace's eccentric and entertaining life. In addition to his divergence from Darwin on two fundamental issues--sexual selection and the origin of the human mind--he pursued topics that most scientific figures of his day conspicuously avoided, including spiritualism, phrenology, mesmerism, environmentalism, and life on Mars.--From publisher description.
"It's okay to doubt." With these opening words of his introduction, Michael Babcock draws in skeptics and believers alike with the comforting assurance that their questions do not disqualify them from faith. Rather, he asserts, doubt is essential to faith because our doubts drive us to God. Readers will instantly relate to Babcock's personal, casual tone as he deftly leads them on a journey between two dangerous extremes. On one side, he cautions readers against a fundamentalist attempt to wipe doubt away. On the other side, he guards against a contemporary tendency to make doubt a badge of honor. Penetrating insights into Bible stories and characters provide a solid scriptural foundation as Babcock describes doubt as a natural part of the human condition. Babcock leads readers to a wonderful conclusion: The only answer to doubt is an encounter with the living God.
EVERYONE FOR EVERYONEthe book (volumes I & II) by Samuel A. Nigro, M.D. The Everybody for Everybody Book is the accumulation of what was learned over 70 plus years of life, over 45 years of marriage, over 40 years as a psychiatrist, 3 years in the U.S. Navy Submarine Service, and as a first generation American with five children and ten grandchildren. The planet and mankind are amazing. To limit ourselves to behaviors as if there is nothing more, is contradicted by an accurate comprehensive understanding of the planet and the universe. Basically, love is superior to all and the universe is the entropy necessary for the expression of love. Love itself requires there to be more. Nothing more is a cruel joke that life and love are meaningless. All logic and reason demand there be more, and we should act as if there is even much more love in anticipation. And if there isnt, then there ought to be! Regardless, the world would be better by believing in such and acting as such. The book provides some articles but most of it is the way to live a transcendental life: organized matter sanctified and given a soul by identity, truth, oneness, good and beauty for everyones life, liberty, and pursuit of happinesspartially the subtitle of the book. You get substance and the transcendental principles for living that save by actuality for a change. This is in contrast to the virtual reality culture of the unreliable manipulating self-discrediting noisy glitzy press&media imposed substanceless non-being which, by suggestibility, turns us into choiceless aliens instead of free persons for the planet. By the self-worshiping self-discrediting press&media, we are on the madman road-rage race to the bottom culture of pollution, disgust, death, and decline. Not by this book. Against vulgar suggestibility and glitz caused gullibility, this book gives real being by teaching six analogous ways of living the wisdom-filled eight categories of metaphors of love in the cone of space-time: As a human particle by elementary physicsevent, spectrum, field, quantum, singularity, dimension, uncertainty, and force. As a human being by community universalsdignity, unity, integrity, identity, spirituality, life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. As a C/catholic, Roman or otherwise, by the sacramentsBaptism, Penance, Holy Communion, Extreme Unction, Holy Orders, Matrimony, and Grace. As a Christian by the virtuesfaith, hope, charity, prudence, justice, courage, temperance, and holiness. As a patient by the universal variables of all therapyliving things are precious, selective ignoring, subdued spontaneity non-self excluded, affect assistance, detached warmth & gentleness, non-reactive listening, C2CC centered candidness, and peace & mercy. And as sanctified by the last words of the crucified Christ. Take your pick or combine them all. Except for the quantity, it is simple. Thousands of aphorisms and concepts about every imaginable topic are offered to teach ancient secrets from nature and natures God (to quote the Founding Fathers of America). Interspersed in the book are the worlds first SEX SATIRES...fiery hilarious...which will help all cope with the prurience flooding the world as entertainment, advertisement and games. SEX SATIRE, properly applied to those exploiting sex, will free you from sex craziness and help keep societys prurience from disrupting your transcendental life. Read it through once; then a few pages or a chapter daily; and problem-solve as needed by index and perusal. You will be better. The world will be better. You will learn to be a real human being for everyone. And you will have your soul back by embracing the universal Mass mantra: life-sacrifice-virtue-lovehumanity- peace-freedom-death.
No scientific traveler was more influenced by the Pacific than Charles Darwin, and his legacy in the region remains unparalleled. Yet the extent of the Pacific's impact on the thought of Darwin and those who followed him has not been sufficiently grasped. In this volume of essays, sixteen scholars explore the many dimensions - biological, geological, anthropological, social, and political - of Darwinism in the Pacific. Fired by Darwinian ideas, nineteenth-century naturalists within and around the Pacific rim worked to further Darwin's programs in their own research: in Seattle, conchologist P. Brooks Randolph; in Honolulu, evolutionist John Thomas Gulick; in Adelaide, botanist Richard Schomburgk; and in Malaysia, biogeographer Alfred Russel Wallace. Lesser-known enthusiasts furnished Darwin with fresh material and replied to his endless inquiries, while young aspiring biologists from Cambridge tested Darwinian ideas directly in the "laboratory" of the Pacific. But the implications of Darwinism for the understanding of human nature and history turned it into a public theory as well as a scientific one. Anthropologists, geographers, missionaries, politicians, and social commentators - from Australia to Japan - all found ways to adapt Darwinism to their own agendas. Darwin's Laboratory demonstrates the variety and richness of Darwinian ideas in the Pacific and, in so doing, shows how the region functioned as a testing ground for the theory of evolution. Further, it illustrates how Darwinian ideas and their European contexts helped invent and define the particular conception we have of the Pacific. Both the general reader and the specialist will find controversy, illumination, and entertainment in this, the first book to probe the extent of Darwinism and Darwinian thinking in the Pacific.

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