In his first full-length book Justin Welby looks at the subject of money and materialism. Designed for study in the weeks of Lent leading up to Easter, Dethroning Mammon reflects on the impact of our own attitudes, and of the pressures that surround us, on how we handle the power of money, called Mammon in this book. Who will be on the throne of our lives? Who will direct our actions and attitudes? Is it Jesus Christ, who brings truth, hope and freedom? Or is it Mammon, so attractive, so clear, but leading us into paths that tangle, trip and deceive? Archbishop Justin explores the tensions that arise in a society dominated by Mammon's modern aliases, economics and finance, and by the pressures of our culture to conform to Mammon's expectations. Following the Gospels towards Easter, this book asks the reader what it means to dethrone Mammon in the values and priorities of our civilisation and in our own existence. In Dethroning Mammon, Archbishop Justin challenges us to use Lent as a time of learning to trust in the abundance and grace of God.
In his first full-length book Justin Welby looks at the subject of money and materialism. Designed for study in the weeks of Lent leading up to Easter, Dethroning Mammon reflects on the impact of our own attitudes, and of the pressures that surround us, on how we handle the power of money, called Mammon in this book. Who will be on the throne of our lives? Who will direct our actions and attitudes? Is it Jesus Christ, who brings truth, hope and freedom? Or is it Mammon, so attractive, so clear, but leading us into paths that tangle, trip and deceive? Archbishop Justin explores the tensions that arise in a society dominated by Mammon's modern aliases, economics and finance, and by the pressures of our culture to conform to Mammon's expectations. Following the Gospels towards Easter, this book asks the reader what it means to dethrone Mammon in the values and priorities of our civilisation and in our own existence. In Dethroning Mammon, Archbishop Justin challenges us to use Lent as a time of learning to trust in the abundance and grace of God.
Each year the Archbishop of Canterbury chooses a religious author to write his Lent book, for which he provides the foreword. This year however Archbishop Justin Welby will write the book himself, constituting his first major book project. In Dethroning Mammon, Archbishop Justin asks the question 'On what cross will we be crucified? The Cross of Christ – the cross of wood – or the Cross of Mammon – the cross of gold?' The former leads to new life, the latter leads finally to death. Following the Gospels towards the Easter story, this book asks the reader what it means to put away the cross of gold, to dethrone Mammon in the values and priorities of our society and in our own lives, and through Lent to come to a new place of trust in the abundance and grace of God.
In a time of political turbulence, and as the Welfare State totters under the strain in a country that has changed dramatically since 1945, Archbishop Justin Welby sets out to identify the values that will enable us to reimagine, and to enact, a more hopeful future. The thesis is that the work of reimagining is as great as it was in 1945, and will happen either by accident – and thus badly – or deliberately. The author draws on Britain's history and Christian tradition to identify this country's foundational values, and the building blocks necessary to implement them in a post-Brexit, multicultural society. He explores the areas in which values are translated into action, including the traditional three of recent history: health (especially public, and mental), housing and education. To these he adds family; the environment; economics and finance; peacebuilding and overseas development; immigration; and integration. He looks particularly at the role of faith groups in enabling, and contributing to, a fairer future. When so many are immobilized by political turmoil, this book builds on our past to offer hope for the future, and practical ways of achieving a more equitable society.
Everything looks different in this world through the lens of the Cross. This book deals with reconciliation, humility, identity, power, suffering, life and atonement. These are familar themes for a Lent book but in Dr Tomlin's hands they are given exciting new meaning which will touch the hearts and minds of men and women in a turbulent modern world. Dr Tomlin is a theologian of the first rank, but he is also a writer with a keen pastoral commitment, celebrated for his common touch.
Facing a terminal cancer diagnosis, David Bryant looks back on his life and writes powerfully about the moments when he unexpectedly encountered God in the most unlikely places: a high security prison; at the bedside of a dying child; in the gift of imagination; or in Bible passages that have been startlingly brought to life in his own experience. Forty reflections offer a reading a day for Lent, with an explanatory introduction and a concluding Easter meditation. He draws widely on poetry, literature, art, music, and above all human encounter, to trace a divine thread running through a life that has been 'always unpredictable and often surprising'. David Bryant died shortly after delivering this final book to his publishers.
In Say it to God Luigi Gioia provides a welcome encouragement to all those who feel the need to freshen their practice of prayer. For Gioia, prayer is not about methods or techniques, but trusting that God is truly interested in everything that happens to us and wants to hear about it. The book leads the reader into the theological aspects of prayer and how it relates to Christ, to the Holy Spirit and to the Church. This is done without using complex theological concepts but simply through scriptural quotations. Chapters are kept brief intentionally to make the book suitable for daily reading over the Lenten period. With a foreword by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Say it to God demonstrates that the everyday, even the most mundane of tasks and situations, can be applied in deepening our practice of prayer.
In I Am With You, Episcopal priest and theologian Kathryn Greene-McCreight examines the biblical portrayal of God's presence among us as light in darkness. Close readings of Scripture are woven into a framework patterned on the seven monastic hours of prayer and the seven days of creation. God's interaction with us in light comes as address, drawing us into relationship with the Creator. The resurrection of Easter morning bears the Light that both illumines our darkness, refines our dross in its flames, and draws us into the presence of God, that 'Light by which we see light'. With an introduction by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, I Am With You is a reflective and thought-provoking guide to the solemn season of Lent.
Offers a biblical view of money and possessions, including discussion of debt, investments, inheritance, materialism, and charity.
Christian entrepreneurs are at the heart of the church’s mission. They are dynamic, innovative followers of Christ who are making a major contribution to our society through the companies they run, the products they make and the people they influence. A Voice to Be Heard explains and celebrates their work, mostly through their own words. Theological educator Richard Higginson and former retail entrepreneur Kina Robertshaw have worked together on this ground-breaking study, based on interviews with fifty entrepreneurs. Exploring issues of vision, creativity, relationships, stewardship, integrity, prayer and perseverance, they show how people running their own businesses are exercising crucial roles in building God’s kingdom. With the church’s encouragement, they have the potential to do even more. ‘Practical, biblical, informative . . . this book conveys vividly the voices of Christian entrepreneurs.’ Lord Griffiths of Fforestfach ‘This book is a treasure. From car dealerships to toy stores, A Voice to Be Heard visits particular entrepreneurs at work and reveals their leadership lessons for us all.’ Eve Poole ‘This book has truth with flesh on. It is a delicious mixture of story and biblical reflection . . . a truly inspiring read.’ Dr R. Paul Stevens
Steven Croft, the next Bishop of Oxford, traces the nature and the exercise of leadership throughout the Bible in its record of ambitious rulers, reluctant prophets and others who found themselves called to leadership positions. He offers timeless wisdom and insight into human nature and the challenge and privilege of leadership. An ideal spiritual companion for all Christians who exercise leadership in the church or at work or in their communities, The Gift of Leadership focuses on such themes as: • Beginning well - orientation • Learning to see – vision • Godly leadership – self-giving • Sowing the word - fruitfulness • Leading change - pioneering • Rediscovering time – Sabbath • Resting Reflective yet substantive, this is a book to return to again and again for renewal and refreshment.
The Bible is rich with complex and diverse material on the topic of money and possessions. Indeed, a close look at many scriptural texts reveals that economics is a core preoccupation of the biblical tradition. In this new work, highly regarded preacher and scholar Walter Brueggemann explores the recurring theme of money and possessions in the Old and New Testaments. He proposes six theses concerning money and possessions in the Bible, observing their contradictory nature to the conventional wisdom and practice of both the ancient world and today's society. Brueggemann advises us to reassess the ways in which our society engages—or does not engage—questions of money and possessions as carriers of social possibility. He invites the church to move toward an alternative neighborly economy that is more consistent with the gospel we confess.
At every level of church life from the local congregation to worldwide denominations, Christians can find themselves in turmoil and divided over a range of important issues. Many conclude that harmony is not achievable, and never will be. Can we, as Archbishop Justin Welby has asked, transform ‘bad disagreement’ into ‘good disagreement’? What would that look like in practice? This book is designed to help readers unpack the idea of ‘good disagreement’ and apply it to their own church situations. It doesn’t enter into specific contentious debates, but instead considers issues such as reconciliation, division, discipline, peacemaking, mediation and mission. It asks what needs to happen for those from differing viewpoints to both listen and be heard, and does not shy away from hard questions about unity in the gospel and the church's public witness. The book draws lessons from the New Testament, church history, and contemporary experience, with chapters from a dozen theologians and practitioners. They are editors Andrew Atherstone and Andrew Goddard, Tory Baucum, Martin Davie, Lis Goddard, Clare Hendry, Toby Howarth, Ashley Null, Ian Paul, Stephen Ruttle, Michael B. Thompson, and Tom Wright.
The idea of leadership failure and derailment has been brushed under the carpet for far too long and only now are statistics appearing on the sheer number of leaders who fail at their jobs. Backstabbers and Bullies provides the latest psychiatric and clinical perspectives on dark-side behaviour, including: - recognising and coping with over-confident, narcissistic and psychopathic leaders; - causes of leadership derailment and failure; - corrupt corporate cultures; and - the criminal personality. Fascinating reading for anyone who has worked alongside a corporate psychopath, business narcissist or histrionic show-off, Backstabbers and Bullies goes beyond the science to explain how to better understand, manage and prevent dark-side behaviour, as well as presenting advice for reducing derailment potential for yourself, your colleagues and your organisation.
In periods of recession, churches frequently respond to social need in practical ways. These responses are often driven by pastoral concern rather than a theology of church and society. But without theological roots, such social action can be vulnerable and episodic. This volume, commissioned by a group of Bishops in hard-hit dioceses, looks to develop strong theological foundations for local social action initiatives by churches, especially for activists who are not familiar with the Church of England’s tradition of social theology, developed by William Temple and others a century ago. In exploring what a renewed Anglican social theology might look like, this also draws on the impact of Catholic Social Teaching and focuses on the core topics of multiculturalism, economics, family patterns, ecology and other key issues.
Life is at once wonderful and appalling, beautiful and horrific. Although we can all give meaning to our lives by trying to live well, is there some given meaning to be discovered? Science cannot answer this question, and philosophical arguments leave the issue open. The monotheistic religions claim that the meaning has been revealed to us, and Christians see this is above all in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. Described by Rowan Williams as ‘that rarity, a Christian public intellectual’, Richard Harries considers the Christian claim in the context of an in-depth discussion of the nature of evil and how this is to be reconciled with a just and loving God. Drawing on a wide range of modern literature, he argues that belief in the resurrection and hope in the face of death is fundamental to faith, and suggests that while there is no final intellectual answer to the problem of evil, we must all, believer and nonbeliever alike, protest against the world and seek to change it, rather than accept it as it is.
How does the market affect and redefine healthcare? The marketisation of Western healthcare systems has now proceeded well into its fourth decade. But the nature and meaning of the phenomenon has become increasingly opaque amidst changing discourses, policies and institutional structures. Moreover, ethics has become focussed on dealing with individual, clinical decisions and neglectful of the political economy which shapes healthcare. This interdisciplinary volume approaches marketisation by exploring the debates underlying the contemporary situation and by introducing reconstructive and reparative discourses. The first part explores contrary interpretations of ‘marketisation’ on a systemic level, with a view to organisational-ethical formation and the role of healthcare ethics. The second part presents the marketisation of healthcare at the level of policy-making, discusses the ethical ramifications of specific marketisation measures and considers the possibility of reconciling market forces with a covenantal understanding of healthcare. The final part examines healthcare workers’ and ethicists’ personal moral standing in a marketised healthcare system, with a view to preserving and enriching virtue, empathy and compassion. Fostering rich reflection on the moral implications of a marketised healthcare system, this book is suitable for health professionals and for academics and students interested in the health sciences, medical ethics and law, social and public policy, philosophy and theology.
A re-issue in B format of Larry Lea's book about the Lord's Prayer. During a time of discouragement, the author felt challenged by God to reflect on this well-known prayer, and so began a journey of discovery that transformed his prayer life.
In this simple, beautifully written book Rowan Williams explores four essential components of the Christian life: baptism, Bible, Eucharist, and prayer. Despite huge differences in Christian thinking and practice both today and in past centuries, he says, these four basic elements have remained constant and indispensable for the majority of those who call themselves Christians. In accessible, pastoral terms Williams discusses the meaning and practice of baptism, the Bible, the Eucharist, and prayer, inviting readers to really think through the Christian faith and how to live it out. Questions for reflection and discussion at the end of each chapter help readers to dig deeper and apply Williams's insights to their own lives.

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