Discover Sociology explores sociology as a discipline of curious minds, with the theoretical, conceptual, and empirical tools needed to understand, analyze, and even change the world. Organized around the four main themes of The Sociological Imagination, Power and Inequality, Technological Transformations of Society, and Globalization, every chapter in the book illuminates the social roots of diverse phenomena and institutions
Discover Sociology explores sociology as a discipline of curious minds, with the theoretical, conceptual, and empirical tools needed to understand, analyze, and even change the world. Organized around the four main themes of The Sociological Imagination, Power and Inequality, Technological Transformations of Society, and Globalization, every chapter in the book illuminates the social roots of diverse phenomena and institutions
With their newest edition, Bill Chambliss and Daina S. Eglitis continue the journey beyond the classroom to help students answer these questions in Discover Sociology. Chambliss and Eglitis inspire curiosity about the social world and empower students by providing the theoretical, conceptual, and empirical tools they need to understand, analyze, and even change the world in which they live. Every chapter in the book integrates robust pedagogical features and empirical research that illuminate the social roots of diverse phenomena and institutions, ranging from poverty and deviance to capitalism and the nuclear family. From exploring whether the use of “study drugs” should be considered cheating to an examination of research showing a correlation between rising student debt and declining rates of marriage, the book’s chapter openers engage students in real-life applications of sociology. Going beyond theory and concepts, the authors also help answer the question, “What can I do with a sociology degree?”
Discover Sociology: Core Concepts explores sociology as a discipline of curious minds, with the theoretical, conceptual, and empirical tools needed to understand, analyze, and even change the world—all in a more streamlined format. It is adapted from Discover Sociology, Third Edition and offers in-depth coverage of 12 high-priority topics that are at the core of almost all introductory sociology courses. Core Concepts maintains its reader-friendly narrative and the hallmark themes of the parent book, including the unequal distribution of power in society (“Inequality Matters”), the sociological imagination (“Private Lives, Public Issues”), and career skills (“What Can I Do With a Sociology Degree?”). A new feature, “Discover and Debate,” shows students how to take effective, evidence-based positions on important social issues, and how to argue in a respectful manner that recognizes the value of different perspectives.
This major new textbook uses lively prose and a series of carefully-crafted pedagogical features to both introduce Sociology as a discipline and to help students realize how deeply sociological issues impact on their own lives. Over the book’s ten chapters, students discover what Sociology is, alongside its historical development and emergent new concerns. They will be led through the theories that underpin the discipline and familiarized with what it takes to undertake good sociological research. Ultimately students will be led and inspired to develop their own sociological imagination – learning to question their own assumptions about the society, the culture and the world around them today.Historically, the majority of introductory Sociology textbooks have run to many hundreds of pages, discouraging students from further reading. By contrast, Discovering Sociology has been carefully designed and developed as a true introduction, covering the key ideas and topics that first year undergraduate students need to engage with without sacrificing intellectual rigour.
This bundle includes Chambliss: Discover Sociology 3e (Paperback) and Harris: Sociology Student's Guide to Writing 2e (Paperback).
This best selling software-based workbook lets students explore dozens of sociological topics and issues, using data from the United States and around the world. With the workbook and accompanying ExplorIt software and data sets, students won't just read about what other sociologists have done, they will discover sociology for themselves. DISCOVERING SOCIOLOGY will add an exciting dimension to the introductory sociology course.
SAGE Readings for Introductory Sociology is a concise, affordable anthology that contains 22 popular sociology statements designed to introduce readers to the sociological perspective. Kimberly McGann puts together readings that cover core topics in sociology, including culture, socialization, interaction, deviance, gender, class, and race. An alternate, topical table of contents suggests ways to match readings to other subfields in sociology (like family, education, work, and religion), and identifies readings that reflect four theoretical traditions: functionalism, symbolic interactionism, conflict theory, and feminism.
Facts101 is your complete guide to Discover Sociology. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
The Facts101 series gives the reader all of the facts, persons, places, things, and concepts that they might be tested on from the textbook Discover Sociology written in an easy to understand format. Preparing for a test has never been easier.
An Introduction to Sociology presents the theoretical approaches, the methods of inquiry, and the concepts with which sociologists attempt to order the intricate phenomena of social interaction. This book provides an illustration of particular investigations that may provide some insights into substantive features of society and social behavior. Organized into six chapters, this book starts with an overview of scientific proposition, which is the statement of a relationship between specified properties of events and objects. This text then explains the fundamental concepts that appear in the empirical and theoretical writings of sociologists. Other chapters present a discussion of what sociologists actually study, which includes the substantive areas of investigation and the aims of the investigation. This book discusses as well the institutionalized areas of society, including the family, the economy, and the polity. The final chapter deals with the theories of the middle-range. This book is a valuable resource for sociologists.
The challenges of teaching a successful introductory sociology course today demand materials from a publisher very different from the norm. Texts that are organized the way the discipline structures itself intellectually no longer connect with the majority of student learners. This is not an issue of pandering to students or otherwise seeking the lowest common denominator. On the contrary, it is a question of again making the practice of sociological thinking meaningful, rigorous, and relevant to today’s world of undergraduates. This comparatively concise, highly visual, and affordable book offers a refreshingly new way forward to reach students, using one of the most powerful tools in a sociologist’s teaching arsenal—the familiar stuff in students’ everyday lives throughout the world: the jeans they wear to class, the coffee they drink each morning, or the phones their professors tell them to put away during lectures. A focus on consumer culture, seeing the strange in the familiar, is not only interesting for students; it is also (the authors suggest) pedagogically superior to more traditional approaches. By engaging students through their stuff, this book moves beyond teaching about sociology to helping instructors teach the practice of sociological thinking. It moves beyond describing what sociology is, so that students can practice what sociological thinking can do. This pedagogy also posits a relationship between teacher and learner that is bi-directional. Many students feel a sense of authority in various areas of consumer culture, and they often enjoy sharing their knowledge with fellow students and with their instructor. Opening up the sociology classroom to discussion of these topics validates students’ expertise on their own life-worlds. Teachers, in turn, gain insight from the goods, services, and cultural expectations that shape students’ lives. While innovative, the book has been carefully crafted to make it as useful and flexible as possible for instructors aiming to build core sociological foundations in a single semester. A map on pages ii–iii identifies core sociological concepts covered so that a traditional syllabus as well as individual lectures can easily be maintained. Theory, method, and active learning exercises in every chapter constantly encourage the sociological imagination as well as the "doing" of sociology.
Hailed upon publication as a cogent and hard-hitting critique, The Sociological Imagination took issue with the ascendant schools of sociology in the United States, calling for a humanist sociology connecting the social, personal, and historical dimensions of our lives. Leading sociologist Todd Gitlin brings this fortieth anniversary edition up to date with a lucid afterword in which he considers the ways social analysis has progressed since Mills first published his study in 1959. A classic in the field, this book still provides rich food for our imagination.
Breaking away from the idea that sociology only ever elaborates the negative, Sociology for Optimists shows that sociology can provide hope in dealing with social issues through critical approaches that acknowledge the positive. From politics and inequality to nature and faith, Mary Holmes shows how a critical and optimistic sociology can help us think about and understand human experience not just in terms of social problems, but in terms of a human capacity to respond to those problems and strive for social change. With contemporary case studies throughout grounding the theory in the real world, this is the perfect companion/antidote to studying sociology.
This bundle includes Chambliss: Discover Sociology, 2e and McGann: SAGE Readings for Introductory Sociology

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