Winner of the 2007 Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society and the 2007 Deems Taylor Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers. Divas and Scholars is a dazzling and beguiling account of how opera comes to the stage, filled with Philip Gossett’s personal experiences of triumphant—and even failed—performances and suffused with his towering and tonic passion for music. Writing as a fan, a musician, and a scholar, Gossett, the world's leading authority on the performance of Italian opera, brings colorfully to life the problems, and occasionally the scandals, that attend the production of some of our most favorite operas. Gossett begins by tracing the social history of nineteenth-century Italian theaters in order to explain the nature of the musical scores from which performers have long worked. He then illuminates the often hidden but crucial negotiations opera scholars and opera conductors and performers: What does it mean to talk about performing from a critical edition? How does one determine what music to perform when multiple versions of an opera exist? What are the implications of omitting passages from an opera in a performance? In addition to vexing questions such as these, Gossett also tackles issues of ornamentation and transposition in vocal style, the matters of translation and adaptation, and even aspects of stage direction and set design. Throughout this extensive and passionate work, Gossett enlivens his history with reports from his own experiences with major opera companies at venues ranging from the Metropolitan and Santa Fe operas to the Rossini Opera Festival at Pesaro. The result is a book that will enthrall both aficionados of Italian opera and newcomers seeking a reliable introduction to it—in all its incomparable grandeur and timeless allure.
David Kimbell traces the history of Italian opera from the Renaissance to the early twentieth century.
These five biographies provide the first complete survey of Italian opera from the early buffo operas of Rossini to Verdi's great masterpieces, Otello and Falstaff, and the verismo operas of Puccini. Andrew Porter has been highly praised for his original and enlightening account of Verdi, and Philip Gossett has received similar acclaim for his treatment of Rossini. Porter, Gossett, William Ashbrooke, Julian Budden, Mosco Carner, and Friedrich Lippmann, all acknowledged experts in the field of Italian opera, combine to offer insight into the traditions and workings of one of the most fascinating periods in the history of opera. Book jacket.
Zum 200. Geburtstag von Giuseppe Verdi. Don Carlos, Otello, Falstaff das Handbuch stellt alle 26 Opern und die weiteren Werke Verdis einzeln vor. Es zeigt auch Verdis Weg bei der Entstehung seiner Opern: vom Libretto über Komposition, Stimmtypen, Vers-Vertonung bis zur Aufführung. Zeit- und Theatergeschichtliches vermitteln, warum die Oper nicht zuletzt durch Verdis Beitrag im 19. Jahrhundert so beliebt war. In der 2., stark überarbeiteten Auflage mit vielen neu verfassten Beiträgen und neuen Kapiteln u. a. zu Kompositionstechnik, Verdi-Renaissance nach 1918, Verdi-Dirigenten.
This study seeks to explore the role and significance of aria insertion, the practice that allowed singers to introduce music of their own choice into productions of Italian operas. Each chapter investigates the art of aria insertion during the nineteenth century from varying perspectives, beginning with an overview of the changing fortunes of the practice, followed by explorations of individual prima donnas and their relationship with particular insertion arias: Carolina Ungher's difficulties in finding a "perfect" aria to introduce into Donizetti's Marino Faliero; Guiditta Pasta's performance of an aria from Pacini's Niobe in a variety of operas, and the subsequent fortunes of that particular aria; Maria Malibran's interpolation of Vaccai's final scene from Giulietta e Romeo in place of Bellini's original setting in his I Capuleti e i Montecchi; and Adelina Patti's "mini-concerts" in the lesson scene of Il barbiere di Siviglia. The final chapter provides a treatment of a short story, "Memoir of a Song," narrated by none other than an insertion aria itself, and the volume concludes with an appendix containing the first modern edition of this short story, a narrative that has lain utterly forgotten since its publication in 1849. This book covers a wide variety of material that will be of interest to opera scholars and opera lovers alike, touching on the fluidity of the operatic work, on the reception of the singers, and on the shifting and hardening aesthetics of music criticism through the period.
Opera Acts explores a wealth of new historical material about singers in the late nineteenth century and challenges the idea that this was a period of decline for the opera singer. In detailed case studies of four figures - the late Verdi baritone Victor Maurel; Bizet's first Carmen, Célestine Galli-Marié; Massenet's muse of the 1880s and '90s, Sibyl Sanderson; and the early Wagner star Jean de Reszke - Karen Henson argues that singers in the late nineteenth century continued to be important, but in ways that were not conventionally 'vocal'. Instead they enjoyed a freedom and creativity based on their ability to express text, act and communicate physically, and exploit the era's media. By these and other means, singers played a crucial role in the creation of opera up to the end of the nineteenth century.
'Impressive volume... as a Professor of music history, I would require graduate students, both performers and incipient musicologists, to read extensively from this volume, with full confidence that it would open their minds to the myriad problems inherent in editing and performing music and engender lively, thoughtful discussion.' -The Opera Quarterly'Much of the material is clearly applicable to modern performance of a wide range of music... Verdi in Performance provides state-of-the-art discussion not only of Verdi scholarship as related to performance, but stimulating presentation of universal music performance concerns by some of the leading scholars, directors, and conductors currently active. The discussions present a myriad of viewpoints and considerations, and both the format of the volume (statement and responses) and the contents encourage further open-ended discussion.' -The Opera Quarterly'A book short in length but rich in intellectual stimulation.' -BBC Music Magazine'Anyone who minds about Verdi will find much here of interest.' -OperaThis anthology of essays by leading Verdi scholars and practitioners, which grew out of an international conference, is essential reading for anyone interested in the way Verdi's operas are performed. It is a lively debate on 'authentic' staging, performance practice, Verdi's ballet scores, and critical editions.
Verdi's Aida was first published in 1978. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
A comprehensive annotated bibliography of all the printed materials on Gioachino Rossini, the famous 19th-century composer
The International Who’s Who in Classical Music 2009 is an unparalleled source of biographical information on singers, instrumentalists, composers, conductors and managers. The directory section lists orchestras, opera companies and other institutions connected with the classical music world. Each biographical entry comprises personal information, principal career details, repertoire, recordings and compositions, and full contact details where available. Appendices provide contact details for national orchestras, opera companies, music festivals, music organizations and major competitions and awards. Entries include individuals involved in all aspects of the world of classical music: composers, instrumentalists, singers, arrangers, writers, musicologists, conductors, directors and managers. Key features: over 8,000 detailed biographical entries covers the classical and light classical fields includes both up-and-coming musicians and well-established names. This book will prove invaluable for anyone in need of reliable, up-to-date information on the individuals and organizations involved in classical music.
Michael William Balfe (1808-1870) rose to fame in London in 1835 immediately after the premiere of his first opera, The Siege of Rochelle. For the next thirty-five years, this unique Dublin-born musician was destined to be the most important operatic composer in Victorian Britain. He was to music in Victorian Britain what his renowned contemporary, Charles Dickens, was to literature. The popularity of their respected works reached far beyond London, Dublin, and New York in the English speaking world. Balfe also personally achieved great success in places such as Paris, Vienna, Berlin, Bologna, Palermo, Trieste, and St. Petersburg in Russia. In all, he composed twenty-eight operatic works over his lifetime. However, when his French, Italian, and German language versions are added, he actually can be credited with forty-three operas. For over fifty years, his opera, The Bohemian Girl, swept around the globe with great success, having been translated into many different languages. This definitive biography took seven years of international research and is long overdue. It corrects many anecdotal errors of previous books. It documents Balfe the man, his work, his descendents, his legacy, and influence. The biography unearths many new facts about this important Victorian composer, his music, his family, and his role as a music director at London's Italian Opera House, where he directed the local premieres of several Verdi operas. It lists all of his operas with premiere casts and the principal arias. It also identifies the current location of all known Balfe's scores and music, including his early Italian compositions which have been deemed "lost" by most scholars. ~
10 vols. organized by "Subject" (Sachteil), and 12 vols. organized by "Personal names" (Personenteil).
Die Oper ist in vielerlei Hinsicht das außergewöhnlichste künstlerische Medium der letzten 400 Jahre: Opernhäuser, Ausstattung, Technik und nicht zuletzt die Künstler lassen sie zu einer nachgerade unerschwinglich teuren Kunstform werden – eine Kunstform, die zudem offenkundig unrealistisch ist. Und doch vermag nichts anderes menschliche Leidenschaften mit solch überwältigender Kraft, Dramatik und Gefühlsstärke auszudrücken wie gerade die Oper. Dieses Buch – seit langem die erste einbändige und zugleich umfassende Gesamtdarstellung zu diesem Thema – liest sich wie eine Ode an die Oper selbst. Seine beiden Autoren stellen zahlreiche Werke der bekanntesten Opernkomponisten vor: von Monteverdi, Händel und Mozart über Verdi, Wagner, Strauss und Puccini bis zu Berg und Britten. Sie bieten einen anschaulichen, oft amüsanten und stets informativen Überblick über die sozialen und politischen Hintergründe der jeweiligen Kompositionen, beziehen deren literarische Kontexte und die wirtschaftlichen Verhältnisse mit ein, unter denen sie entstanden sind, und vernachlässigen auch nicht die Polemiken, die das Operngeschehen über die Jahrhunderte kontinuierlich begleitet haben. Auch wenn inzwischen die beliebtesten und langlebigsten Werke aus einer längst vergangenen Epoche stammen, deren Lebensumstände uns heute völlig fremd sind – und auch wenn die zeitgenössische Oper heutzutage auf den Bühnen kaum eine Rolle spielt –, so hat die Oper doch nichts an Reiz, Lebendigkeit und Attraktion eingebüßt. Heute wie vor 400 Jahren lässt sie das Publikum Tränen vergießen, zischen, heftig debattieren oder in Begeisterungsstürme ausbrechen. In dieser Wirkungsmacht übertrifft sie jede andere Kunstform.

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