"The genetic trail an ancestor leaves behind is every bit as important as his paper trail. Though Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA testing, the modern genealogist has a powerful new tool for researching his roots" -- back cover.
650 Millionen Europäer sollen von nur sieben Urmüttern abstammen? Sie meinen, das kann nicht sein? Bryan Sykes, Professor für Genetik an der Universität Oxford, hat die Mitochondrien-DNA Tausender Europäer analysiert und konnte dabei sieben Bausteine entdeckten, die sich auf sieben Töchter der Urmutter Eva zurückführen lassen. Darüber hinaus lässt sich sagen, wann unsere Vorfahren erstmals auftraten, wo und wie sie lebten und wohin sie gingen ═ somit kann jeder von uns herausfinden, von welchem der sieben Stämme er abstammt: Folgen Sie Bryan Sykes auf seiner sensationellen Reise in unsere Vergangenheit!
Heute ist es möglich, den Werdegang der Menschheit mithilfe der Genetik zu rekonstruieren. Das Fazit des Autors: Alle Menschen sind miteinander verwandt und Mischlinge, und er führt dadurch jede Form von Rassismus ad absurdum.
A clear, practical and up-to-date guide to genetic testing in family history research, including advice on choosing a test and using your results
Unlock the secrets in your DNA! Discover the answers to your family history mysteries using the most-cutting edge tool available. This plain-English guide is a one-stop resource for how to use DNA testing for genealogy. Inside, you'll find guidance on what DNA tests are available, plus the methodologies and pros and cons of the three major testing companies and advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific genealogy questions. And once you've taken a DNA test, this guide will demystify the often-overwhelming subject and explain how to interpret DNA test results, including how to understand ethnicity estimates and haplogroup designations, navigate suggested cousin matches, and use third-party tools like GEDmatch to further analyze your data. To give you a holistic view of genetic testing for ancestry, the book also discusses the ethics and future of genetic genealogy, as well as how adoptees and others who know little about their ancestry can especially benefit from DNA testing. The book features: Colorful diagrams and expert definitions that explain key DNA terms and concepts such as haplogroups and DNA inheritance patterns Detailed guides to each of the major kinds of DNA tests and which tests can solve which family mysteries, with case studies showing how each can be useful Information about third-party tools you can use to more thoroughly analyze your test results once you've received them Test comparison guides and research forms to help you select the most appropriate DNA test and organize your results and research once you've been tested Whether you've just heard of DNA testing or you've tested at all three major companies, this guide will give you the tools you need to unpuzzle your DNA and discover what it can tell you about your family tree.
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
Interest in family history is at its highest. Young people want to know where they came from, as well as the people who built their family and their country. Genetic Genealogy is an exciting new field that can help in tracing lineage and finding a haplogroup to see where a person's ancestors traveled. DNA: Window to the Past explains all about genetic genealogy, what is DNA, why it is important, and how it can be useful in learning more about a person's heritage. Readers explore their own and other people's pasts, creating an understanding of the opportunities and challenges that built this nation. ABDO & Daughters is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.
Discover the Secrets of Your Ancestors with DNA Research and Genealogy No matter how much time you spend in the present, there's no escaping the fact that your past has a great impact on your future.Have you ever wished you knew more about your family history?DNA and Genealogy explains all you need to know about DNA science. It explains the amazing relationship between DNA and inheritance. You'll also find out the essentials of genealogy, and how it can help you predict certain health ailments.Purchase DNA and Genealogy NOW to find out about your family's past, and how it could impact your future.Here's a sample of what you can learn from this essential book:"DNA and Genealogy may seem unrelated, but in reality, are interdependent. DNA is the biomolecule that stores all the information of an organism that is vital for its functions. The DNA not only stores information, it is the hereditary material in all most all living beings. On the other hand, Genealogy is the science and study of family history."DNA and Genealogy provides basic knowledge about the structure and function of a DNA molecule. It also explains how DNA is inherited from your ancestors according to the laws of inheritance and gives examples of some interesting experiments. You'll even learn the techniques of modern Genealogy and how they're related to health and research!Do our ancestors hold the key to our modern day health and wellbeing? Find out now!Purchase your copy of DNA and Genealogy TODAY, and start connecting your past to your present - and your future!
This book contains the papers delivered at sessions organised by the Genealogy and Local History Section at the annual conferences of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) between 2001 and 2005; many of these are updated versions of the original presentations. The authors, all experts in their own fields, address those engaged in delivering genealogy and local history services in libraries, archives and museums across the world.
Here's how to trace Jewish DNA specific to Eastern European Ashkenazim through a history of migrations toward a merging mosaic of communities. A perfect book for beginners in interpreting your DNA test results for family history and ancestry and taking a closer look at the founding mothers of Eastern European Jewish communities as well as the fathers. Where did the women originate? What directions were the migrations in ancient, medieval, and later times? And how did this bring about the particular DNA/genetic patterns we see today in the diverse Eastern European Jewish communities now found all over the world. Look up the genealogy of Jewish genes/DNA through 3,000 years of history. Here's how to interpret your own results. You don't need a science background to match your DNA to your most recent common ancestor who lived 250 or 100 or 1,000 years ago. Scientists speak out on the founding mothers and fathers of the Ashkenazic Jewish communities.
DNA testing can serve as a powerful tool that unlocks the hidden information within our bodies for family history research. This book explains how genetic genealogy works and answers the questions of genealogists and individuals seeking information on their family trees. • Presents an overview to genealogical principles and an introduction to DNA testing for nonexpert audiences • Explains how genetic genealogy can provide data from within our bodies that tells us about who we are, who our ancestors were, and what characteristics our descendants may have • Addresses key legal and ethical issues regarding DNA testing • Describes the accepted protocols of DNA collection, handling, processing, evaluation, and interpretation that make DNA information more reliable than the other kinds of genealogical information
"This book looks at all the latest advances in DNA testing from the Y-chromosome tests used in surname projects through to the latest autosomal DNA tests. Debbie Kennett explores the use of new social media, including Facebook, Twitter, blogs and wikis, along with more traditional networking methods. DNA and social Networking is an indispensable guide to the use of twenty-first-century technology in family history research" --Dust jacket flap.
Genealogists are now using molecular genealogy-comparing and matching people by matrilineal DNA lineages-mtDNA or patrilineal Y-chromosome ancestry and/or racial percentages tests. People interested in ancestry now look at genetic markers to trace the migrations of the human species. Here's how to trace your genealogy by DNA from your grandparents back 10,000 or more years. Anyone can be interested in DNA for ancestry research, but of interest to Jews from Eastern Europe is to see how different populations from a mosaic of communities reached their current locations. From who are you descended? What markers will shed light on your deepest ancestry? You can study DNA for medical reasons or to discover the geographic travels and dwelling places of some of your ancestors. How do Europeans in general fit into the great migrations of prehistory that took all to where they are today based on their genetic DNA markers and sequences? Where is the geographic center of their origin and the roots of all people? Specifically, how can you interpret your DNA test for family history as a beginner in researching ancestry and your own family history?
DNA genealogy is a new field of science which considers patterns of mutations, which are different in different human lineages, in the DNA of present-day humans and of our ancient ancestors. Since the DNA is often preserved in ancient excavated bones, including those in archaeological burials, and can be recovered and studied, this approach allows us to compare the mutation patterns in the course of centuries and millennia. This in turn provides us with a knowledge of how often the mutations occur, that they are gradually changed over centuries and millennia, and, hence, calibrate the rate of mutations in various sites of the DNA in terms of time. In other words, it gives us a “molecular tool” aiming at establishing chronology of events along the ancient history of the humankind. Since the DNA is a molecule, DNA genealogy is also called the “Molecular History”. This is a subject of this book. The book begins with an explanation of what is a nature of mutations in the DNA, why the mutations are random, how to measure their rates, in terms of how many mutations occur in the DNA over centuries and millennia, therefore, to calculate their mutation rate constants. This first part of the book provides the reader with many examples of how DNA genealogy employs the mutation rates to uncover hidden puzzles of ancient human history, such as when Homo sapiens first appeared, who were ancient Europeans, Asians, Africans, Americans compared with their present-day descendants in terms of their DNA lineages, and introduces a rather simple calculator which everyone can run on their personal computer devices, iPhones, etc. to conduct such calculations of ancient chronology. Subsequent chapters of the book consider such controversial issues as whether early people came “out of Africa” or “into Africa” (both hypotheses have their supporters among scientists), who were the ancient Aryans and why their language obtained – much later – a name “Indo-European”, where was a homeland of a majority of nowadays Europeans and Native Americans (a hint – South Siberia), who were ancient Jews and Arabs and when their actual common ancestor lived, what DNA was revealed from a few Khazar burials, why look-alike ancient ceramics, made many thousand years ago, was found both in Europe and Asia, how ancient and contemporary languages are connected with the DNA of people, both ancient and contemporary. The book is targeted for multidisciplinary scientists as well as students and advanced general readership.
Find your own personal Adam and Eve. Personal and oral history are evidence, but stronger still is DNA-driven genealogy. Make a time capsule, scrapbook or database of your family's founders. If you're interested in personal or oral history, DNA-driven genealogy, family history, ancestry, life stories, time capsules and tracing your own personal Adam and Eve, here's how to start researching your own family history at the cellular level when written records stop and oral history contributes to the evidence. What you're looking for in the search for your own origins and migrations is evidence. Every family has its own Adam and Eve-the original founders of a particular family line on either the male or female side. Find yours. Trace your ancestral founders through DNA-driven genealogy. Genealogists now can use molecular genealogy-comparing and matching people by matrilineal DNA lineages-mtDNA or patrilineal Y-chromosome ancestry and/or racial percentages tests. People interested in ancestry now look at genetic markers to trace the migrations of the human species. Here's how to trace your genealogy by DNA from your grandparents back 10,000 or more years. Anyone can be interested in DNA for ancestry research. Build a time capsule documenting, how your own family is a mosaic of communities. What markers will shed light on your deepest ancestry? Discover the geographic travels and dwelling places of some of your ancestors. What's random and what's not? Use these tools to study the history of your ancestors as part of a larger population. Look for similar patterns.
This book combines linguistic and historical approaches with the latest techniques of DNA analysis and shows the insights these offer for every kind of genealogical research. It focuses on British names, tracing their origins to different parts of the British Isles and Europe and revealing how names often remain concentrated in the districts where they first became established centuries ago. In the process the book casts fresh light on the ancient peopling of the British Isles. The authors consider why some names die out while others spread across the globe. They use recent advances in DNA testing to investigate whether particular surnames have single, dual, or multiple origins, and to find out if the various forms of a single name have a common origin. They show how information from DNA can be combined with historical evidence and techniques to distinguish between individuals with the same name and different names with similar spellings, and to identifty the name of the same individual or family spelt in various ways in different times and places. The final chapter of this paperback edition, looking at the use of genetics in historical research, has been updated to include new work on the DNA of Richard III.
The Human Genome Project completed sequencing the entire human genetic code in 2003, two years ahead of schedule. That brisk pace has characterized the private genomics industry as well, with prices for personal sequencing dropping from tens of thousands to only hundreds of dollars in less than a decade. Through this collection of articles, readers will recognize how DNA testing has opened new doors in medicine and science, as well as sparked new questions about medical ethics, human ancestry, and the self.
Includes information on doing genealogical research in Croatia, Bulgaria, Hungary, Eastern Europe, Poland, and Greece and research techniques such as interpreting family histories and ancestry DNA test results, collecting personal histories and interviewing older adults, recovering and preserving documents and other forms of information.
Here's how to open your own genealogy, family history journalism, or personal history business. This includes a genealogy course template and instruction on how to start and operate a home-based business working with personal and oral histories, genealogy, family history, and life story writing. You also learn how to interview people, what questions to ask, and how to put together a business and/or a course or book on any aspect of genealogy around the world, journalism, writing, personal history, and life story writing. Start your own course using the genealogy course template to inspire you to develop your own specialties and niche areas. Work with almost any ethnic group, and create businesses ranging from DNA-driven genealogy reporting services to family history, memoirs writing, or personal history videography services. Use social history to find information such as female ancestors' maiden names that had not been recorded using hidden and niche areas of information, including ethnic, religious, and institutional sources such as widows' military pension applications. Develop genealogy and personal history classes anywhere. You'll make history. To start, first you need to create a course syllabus-either to teach beginners genealogy or to train professionals in other fields to use personal history techniques to find hidden information, or organize information for the reports you generate for your clients or family. You'll learn how to write social history by using genealogy journalism resources, find hidden records, and market your own course or write your book or report in many different areas of personal history and genealogy journalism. Make family tree charts. Start your own business, club, franchise, or course.

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