"The genetic trail an ancestor leaves behind is every bit as important as his paper trail. Though Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA testing, the modern genealogist has a powerful new tool for researching his roots" -- back cover.
A plain-English guide that explains the how and why of genealogy DNA testing. Bettinger gives you advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific genealogy questions, and helps you demystify and interpret the test results. He also discusses the ethics and future of genetic genealogy, and how adoptees can benefit from it.
An easy-to-use guide to finding one's ancestors with the latest in new technology and scientific techniques—including blogs, web auctions, wikis, and YouTube Presenting the future of family history, this up-to-date book offers a guide to using social networking, such as Facebook and Twitter, as a research tool and explains the facts and potential of DNA testing for the genealogist. Family history research has come a long way from the local record office—now 21st-century scientific and technological developments have changed the way people look into their family pasts, allowing them to delve further back. Many tools which were not conceived with the genealogist in mind are increasingly being exploited by family historians, either to advance their research or to network with other genealogists. Many family historians struggle to cope with these new technologies and this book explains how to use these new tools effectively.
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
Like many adoptees, Don Anderson wanted to know where he came from. But would he be setting himself up for disappointment by searching? Would he discover parents who were not alive-or worse, parents who didn't want to know him? Would he be able to find them at all? Paper and Spit chronicles Anderson's journey. Follow him every step of the way, from filing his first application in 1995, to obtaining information from the adoption agency that placed him, to knocking on his maternal aunt's door in 2001, to finally confirming the identity of his father in 2015. Using DNA and genealogy, Anderson finds not only the identity of his birth parents but also his true ethnic heritage. In his relentless pursuit, he attends conferences, classes, and studies-and he never gives up his search. Anderson discovers that his connection to his roots is stronger than he realizes-and once he reconnects, he never lets go. Paper and Spit is filled with suspense, disappointments, breakthroughs, and climactic moments that make it a great read. Even if adoption is not your story, Anderson's memoir will inspire you to find the roots of your identity and heritage.
Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history? What's the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you're a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here's how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians. Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy-to extend family history research?" Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes's book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment. Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: "Putting the genes in genealogy." Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.
Finally, in the rapidly evolving field of genetic genealogy an up-to-date resource is here! A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond provides genealogists with the knowledge and confidence to use DNA testing for family research. The book guides genealogists in understanding various tests and determining what DNA segments came from which ancestor. The book explains how DNA testing helps when written records stop and discusses how testing proves or disprove oral family history. Learn which tests help adoptees; understand why you resemble your relatives and how testing can connect you with cousins you never knew. Discover how to encourage potential cousins to test and learn guidelines for becoming a project administrator, genetic genealogy speaker or facilitator for your genealogical society’s DNA interest group. A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond helps experienced and fledgling researchers become genetic genealogists able to use DNA testing to resolve genealogical roadblocks.
This book combines linguistic and historical approaches with the latest techniques of DNA analysis and show the insights these offer for every kind of genealogical research. The book will be welcomed by all those engaged in genealogical research, including everyone seeking to discover the histories of their names and families.
Find your own personal Adam and Eve. Personal and oral history are evidence, but stronger still is DNA-driven genealogy. Make a time capsule, scrapbook or database of your family's founders. If you're interested in personal or oral history, DNA-driven genealogy, family history, ancestry, life stories, time capsules and tracing your own personal Adam and Eve, here's how to start researching your own family history at the cellular level when written records stop and oral history contributes to the evidence. What you're looking for in the search for your own origins and migrations is evidence. Every family has its own Adam and Eve-the original founders of a particular family line on either the male or female side. Find yours. Trace your ancestral founders through DNA-driven genealogy. Genealogists now can use molecular genealogy-comparing and matching people by matrilineal DNA lineages-mtDNA or patrilineal Y-chromosome ancestry and/or racial percentages tests. People interested in ancestry now look at genetic markers to trace the migrations of the human species. Here's how to trace your genealogy by DNA from your grandparents back 10,000 or more years. Anyone can be interested in DNA for ancestry research. Build a time capsule documenting, how your own family is a mosaic of communities. What markers will shed light on your deepest ancestry? Discover the geographic travels and dwelling places of some of your ancestors. What's random and what's not? Use these tools to study the history of your ancestors as part of a larger population. Look for similar patterns.
Written by two of the country's top genealogists, Trace Your Roots with DNA is the first book to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer. After a brief introduction to genealogy and genetics fundamentals, the authors explain the types of available testing, what kind of information the tests can provide, how to interpret the results, and how the tests work (it doesn't involve digging up your dead relatives). It's in expensive, easy to do, and the results are accurate: It's as simple as swabbing the inside of your cheek and popping a sample in the mail. Family lore has it that a branch of our family emigrated to Argentina and now I've found some people there with our name. Can testing tell us whether we're from the same family? My mother was adopted and doesn't know her ethnicity. Are there any tests available to help her learn about her heritage? I just discovered someone else with my highly unusual surname. How can we find out if we have a common ancestor? These are just a few of the types of genealogical scenarios readers can pursue. The authors reveal exactly what is possible-and what is not possible-with genetic testing. They include case studies of both famous historial mysteries and examples of ordinary folks whose exploration of genetic genealogy has enabled them to trace their roots.
Reconnect with your roots! Adoptees, foundlings, and others with unknown parentage face unique challenges in researching their ancestors. Enter this book: a comprehensive guide to adoption genealogy that has the resources you need to find your family through genetic testing. Inside, you'll find: Strategies for connecting your genealogy to previous genealogists Detailed guides for using DNA tests and tools, plus how to analyze your test results and apply them to research Real-life success stories that put the book's techniques into practice and inspire you to seek your own discoveries
"Genetic Genealogy in Practice covers the basic knowledge needed to apply DNA evidence to genealogical questions and then reinforces this foundation with practical applications. Each chapter ends with exercises that include real problems that researchers encounter. Answers allow complex concepts to be reviewed and mastered. As well as covering the basics of DNA testing for family history research problems, Genetic Genealogy in Practice includes discussions of ethical issues, genealogical standards, and tips on how to incorporate genetic evidence into a written conclusion. Researchers of all levels will gain a better understanding of genetic genealogy from this book."--Page [4] of cover.
Discover the Secrets of Your Ancestors with DNA Research and Genealogy No matter how much time you spend in the present, there's no escaping the fact that your past has a great impact on your future.Have you ever wished you knew more about your family history?DNA and Genealogy explains all you need to know about DNA science. It explains the amazing relationship between DNA and inheritance. You'll also find out the essentials of genealogy, and how it can help you predict certain health ailments.Purchase DNA and Genealogy NOW to find out about your family's past, and how it could impact your future.Here's a sample of what you can learn from this essential book:"DNA and Genealogy may seem unrelated, but in reality, are interdependent. DNA is the biomolecule that stores all the information of an organism that is vital for its functions. The DNA not only stores information, it is the hereditary material in all most all living beings. On the other hand, Genealogy is the science and study of family history."DNA and Genealogy provides basic knowledge about the structure and function of a DNA molecule. It also explains how DNA is inherited from your ancestors according to the laws of inheritance and gives examples of some interesting experiments. You'll even learn the techniques of modern Genealogy and how they're related to health and research!Do our ancestors hold the key to our modern day health and wellbeing? Find out now!Purchase your copy of DNA and Genealogy TODAY, and start connecting your past to your present - and your future!
DNA testing can serve as a powerful tool that unlocks the hidden information within our bodies for family history research. This book explains how genetic genealogy works and answers the questions of genealogists and individuals seeking information on their family trees. • Presents an overview to genealogical principles and an introduction to DNA testing for nonexpert audiences • Explains how genetic genealogy can provide data from within our bodies that tells us about who we are, who our ancestors were, and what characteristics our descendants may have • Addresses key legal and ethical issues regarding DNA testing • Describes the accepted protocols of DNA collection, handling, processing, evaluation, and interpretation that make DNA information more reliable than the other kinds of genealogical information
Easy to read and hard to put down, Finding Family is the first book to chronicle the paradigm-shifting application of genetic genealogy to adoption search. Whether you're searching for your own roots or just craving a darn good read, Finding Family is a book you will likely devour in one sitting...and wholeheartedly recommend to others.
An acclaimed journalist travels the globe to solve the mystery of her ancestry, confronting the question at the heart of the American experience of immigration, race, and identity: Who are my people? “A thoughtful, beautiful meditation on what makes us who we are . . . and the values and ideals that bind us together as Americans.”—Barack Obama “A rich and revealing memoir . . . Futureface raises urgent questions having to do with history and complicity.”—The New York Times Alex Wagner has always been fascinated by stories of exile and migration. Her father’s ancestors immigrated to the United States from Ireland and Luxembourg. Her mother fled Rangoon in the 1960s, escaping Burma’s military dictatorship. In her professional life, Wagner reported from the Arizona-Mexico border, where agents, drones, cameras, and military hardware guarded the line between two nations. She listened to debates about whether the United States should be a melting pot or a salad bowl. She knew that moving from one land to another—and the accompanying recombination of individual and tribal identities—was the story of America. And she was happy that her own mixed-race ancestry and late twentieth-century education had taught her that identity is mutable and meaningless, a thing we make rather than a thing we are. When a cousin’s offhand comment threw a mystery into her personal story–introducing the possibility of an exciting new twist in her already complex family history—Wagner was suddenly awakened to her own deep hunger to be something, to belong, to have an identity that mattered, a tribe of her own. Intoxicated by the possibility, she became determined to investigate her genealogy. So she set off on a quest to find the truth about her family history. The journey takes Wagner from Burma to Luxembourg, from ruined colonial capitals with records written on banana leaves to Mormon databases and high-tech genetic labs. As she gets closer to solving the mystery of her own ancestry, she begins to grapple with a deeper question: Does it matter? Is our enduring obsession with blood and land, race and identity, worth all the trouble it’s caused us? The answers can be found in this deeply personal account of her search for belonging, a meditation on the things that define us as insiders and outsiders and make us think in terms of “us” and “them.” In this time of conflict over who we are as a country, when so much emphasis is placed on ethnic, religious, and national divisions, Futureface constructs a narrative where we all belong.
A comprehensive description of the discovery of the Cohen (Priestly) Gene, with detailed analyses of Abraham's chromosome signature, this work confirms the biblical origin of world Jewry.
Interest in family history is at its highest. Young people want to know where they came from, as well as the people who built their family and their country. Genetic Genealogy is an exciting new field that can help in tracing lineage and finding a haplogroup to see where a person's ancestors traveled. DNA: Window to the Past explains all about genetic genealogy, what is DNA, why it is important, and how it can be useful in learning more about a person's heritage. Readers explore their own and other people's pasts, creating an understanding of the opportunities and challenges that built this nation. ABDO & Daughters is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.
This is the inspiring and “page-turning” (Booklist) true story of Paul Fronczak, a man who recently discovered that he had been kidnapped as a baby—and how his quest to find out who he really is upturned the genealogy industry, his own family, and set in motion the second longest cold-case in US history. In 1964, a woman pretending to be a nurse kidnapped an infant boy named Paul Fronczak from a Chicago hospital. Two years later, police found a boy abandoned outside a variety store in New Jersey. The FBI tracked down Dora Fronczak, the kidnapped infant’s mother, and she identified the abandoned boy as her son. The family spent the next fifty years believing they were whole again—but Paul was always unsure about his true identity. Then, four years ago—spurred on by the birth of his first child, Emma Faith—Paul took a DNA test. The test revealed that he was definitely not Paul Fronczak. From that moment on, Paul has been on a tireless mission to find the man whose life he’s been living—and to discover who abandoned him, and why. Poignant and inspiring, The Foundling is a story about a child lost and a faith found, about the permanence of families and the bloodlines that define you, and about the emotional toll of both losing your identity and rediscovering who you truly are.
Genetic genealogy generates compelling questions as people around the world attempt to understand haplogroups, ethnicity, and genetic matches. DNA Q&A has curated actual questions from real people who've sought to better understand DNA via the Family History Fanatics YouTube channel, eConferences, and live presentations. Is your question, or something similar, in the book? Find out the answer to it and more! "What is the best testing companies for adoptees?" "FAMILY TREE DNA now accepts imported data from the other services. Wouldn't that make their database potentially the best overall?" "Why did I receive completely different ethnicity results when I uploaded my AncestryDNA results to GEDmatch.com and MyHeritage?" "My brother and I sent our samples into AncestryDNA recently. We have the same biological parents, but our results were significantly different. Isn't genetic testing no better than astrology?" "On 23andMe in DNA relatives, a woman is my father's half-sister. He doesn't have a half-sister. What is going on?"

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