Explores fatherhood from psychological, genetic, and neuroscience perspectives to challenge misperceptions and demonstrate the profound impact of fathers on children's lives.
For too long, we've thought of fathers as little more than sources of authority and economic stability in the lives of their children. Yet cutting-edge studies drawing unexpected links between fathers and children are forcing us to reconsider our assumptions and ask new questions: What changes occur in men when they are "expecting"? Do fathers affect their children's language development? What are the risks and rewards of being an older-than-average father at the time the child is born? What happens to a father's hormone levels at every stage of his child's development, and can a child influence the father's health? Just how much do fathers matter? In Do Fathers Matter? the award-winning journalist and father of five Paul Raeburn overturns the many myths and stereotypes of fatherhood as he examines the latest scientific findings on the parent we've often overlooked. Drawing on research from neuroscientists, animal behaviorists, geneticists, and developmental psychologists, among others, Raeburn takes us through the various stages of fatherhood, revealing the profound physiological connections between children and fathers, from conception through adolescence and into adulthood—and the importance of the relationship between mothers and fathers. In the process, he challenges the legacy of Freud and mainstream views of parental attachment, and also explains how we can become better parents ourselves. Ultimately, Raeburn shows how the role of the father is distinctly different from that of the mother, and that embracing fathers' significance in the lives of young people is something we can all benefit from. An engrossing, eye-opening, and deeply personal book that makes a case for a new perspective on the importance of fathers in our lives no matter what our family structure, Do Fathers Matter? will change the way we view fatherhood today.
A 2015 National Parenting Publications Awards Gold Winner A Mom's Choice Awards Gold Medal Winner In Do Fathers Matter? the award-winning journalist and father of five Paul Raeburn overturns the lingering myths and stereotypes of bumbling dads and disciplinarian patriarchs through an in-depth and personal investigation of the latest scientific findings on the parent we've often overlooked. Drawing on research from neuroscientists, animal behaviorists, geneticists, and developmental psychologists, among others, Raeburn takes us through the various stages of fatherhood, revealing the profound physiological connections between children and their fathers, from conception through adolescence and into adulthood-and how these connections can help us become better parents ourselves. Raeburn shows us how the role of the father is distinctly different from that of the mother, and that embracing fathers' significance in the lives of young people is something we can all benefit from. An engrossing and eye-opening book that makes a case for a new perspective on the fathers in our lives no matter what our family structure, Do Fathers Matter? will change the way we view fatherhood today.
“I absolutely loved this book, both as a parent and as a nerd.” —Jessica Lahey, author of The Gift of Failure As every parent knows, kids are surprisingly clever negotiators. But how can we avoid those all-too-familiar wails of “That’s not fair!” and “You can’t make me!”? In The Game Theorist’s Guide to Parenting, the award-winning journalist and father of five Paul Raeburn and the game theorist Kevin Zollman pair up to highlight tactics from the worlds of economics and business that can help parents break the endless cycle of quarrels and ineffective solutions. Raeburn and Zollman show that some of the same strategies successfully applied to big business deals and politics—such as the Prisoner’s Dilemma and the Ultimatum Game—can be used to solve such titanic, age-old parenting problems as dividing up toys, keeping the peace on long car rides, and sticking to homework routines. Raeburn and Zollman open each chapter with a common parenting dilemma. Then they show how carefully concocted schemes involving bargains and fair incentives can save the day. Through smart case studies of game theory in action, Raeburn and Zollman reveal how parents and children devise strategies, where those strategies go wrong, and what we can do to help raise happy and savvy kids while keeping the rest of the family happy too. Delightfully witty, refreshingly irreverent, and just a bit Machiavellian, The Game Theorist’s Guide to Parenting looks past the fads to offer advice you can put into action today.
Why Fathers Count: The Importance of Fathers and Their Involvement with Children (edited by Sean E. Brotherson and Joseph M. White) is an anthology (27 articles) dealing with the most important work men ever do?-being totally involved in the lives of their children and families. It is men's strengths, their capacity to care and protect and give, that are needed by children, women, and men themselves. In a culture that questions the value of men in family life, we need a compelling perspective on what men can contribute to their families and communities and insight on the ways in which fathers and father figures make a meaningful difference. Why Fathers Count offers that insight, giving a fresh and powerful perspective on the meaningful contributions of fathers and father figures to the lives of children and families.
In the tradition of Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind, Acquainted with the Night is a powerful memoir of one man’s struggle to deal with the adolescent depression and bipolar disorder of his son and his daughter. Seven years ago Paul Raeburn’s son, Alex, eleven, was admitted to a psychiatric hospital after leaving his fifth-grade classroom in an inexplicable rage. He was hospitalized three times over the next three years until he was finally diagnosed by a psychiatrist as someone exhibiting a clear-cut case of bipolar disorder. This ended a painful period of misdiagnosis and inappropriate drug therapy. Then Raeburn’s younger daughter, Alicia, twelve, was diagnosed as suffering from depression after episodes of self-mutilation and suicidal thoughts. She too was repeatedly admitted to psychiatric hospitals. All during this terrible, painful time, Raeburn’s marriage was disintegrating, and he had to ask what he and his wife might have done, unwittingly, to contribute to their children’s mental illness. And so, literally to save his children’s lives, he used all the resources available to him as a science reporter and writer to educate himself on their diseases and the various drugs and therapies available to help them return from a land of inner torment. In Paul Raeburn’s skilled hands, this memoir of a family stricken with the pain of depression and mania becomes a cathartic story that any reader can share, even as parents unlucky enough to be in a similar position will find it of immeasurable practical value in their own struggles with the child psychiatry establishment.
"This book is an outstanding successor to Silent Spring-it's a gripping yet even-handed account of what happens when good science meets bad public policy. The result ends up on your dinner plate, for better or worse".-San Francisco Examiner. "[Raeburn] recounts in fascinating detail how science and government have tried to protect our endowment of germ plasm through seed banks, breeding programs, botanical gardens and biosphere reserves".-New York Times. "A well-reasoned, timely call for American agriculture to recognize that putting eggs in a single basket can lead to disaster".-Kirkus. "Science journalism at its best: a lively, well-informed account of scientists at work that reveals how the vaunted productivity of American crops, achieved at the expense of their natural genetic diversity, conceals a devastating vulnerability to pollution and pestilence".-Barry Commoner. Paul Raeburn, science editor of the Associated Press, gives us an eye-opening account of how the genetic manipulation of American crops threatens our food supply-and what we must do to try to avert this disaster. This Bison Books edition carries a new preface by the author.
Explores the scientific side of fatherhood, revealing that it alters a man's sexuality, rewires his brain, and changes his hormonal profile.
Originally published in hardcover in 2014.
Explores gender-based parenting and communication styles to reveal how to overcome conflicts and adapt instinct-based techniques in complementary ways, in a guide that offers insight into biological factors while identifying common milestone pitfalls. Original.
"Most men spend very little time pondering the question, Am I doing the right things to become a great dad? This book addresses this most important question in a profound way. It's filled with personal stories, focused on powerful principles, and is written for real people. We all know how easy it is, biologically, to become a father. What we often don't realize is that it takes work, dedication, and learned skills to become a dad, especially a great dad." - From the foreword by Jack Canfield, Co-Creator, #1 New York Times best selling series Chicken Soup for the Soul (r) In How to Be a Great Dad, you will learn: The 15-day Great Dad Challenge that transforms fathers into dads. Why dads matter way more than you may think. The lifelong impact fathers have on their children. The three simple and strategic skills to great dad success that all dads can master. Why bad or absent dads can land kids in prison. How to become the father you wish you'd had. Why "father nurture" is as important as "mother nurture." Why saying "I'm proud of you" makes all the difference. Why "I'll love you no matter what" means so much to your kids. Why a hug is not "just a hug" when it comes from Dad. How to build your kids' self-esteem. How to give what you may not have received. A doable process to overcome hurts or limitations from the past. Neil Chethik, executive director of The Carnegie Center, writes, "Keith Zafren is an inspiring guide on this adventure into the heart of fathering. Read this book. It will make you a better dad, and it may even help you forgive your own father for the mistakes he inevitably made." Neil Chethik Executive Director, The Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning Author, FatherLoss and VoiceMale "WOW!!! 'Healing a Father Wound' was by far the most impactful and emotional section of any book I have ever read. I can't even describe how deeply this teaching affected me. The feeling of 'choked up' stayed throughout reading the section, and keeps coming back even now. I realized clearly how my own father wound has affected my entire life, and still does to this day. It also made me realize how the healing process is a daily reward to me and my boys, and so worth the effort. My heart was smiling while my eyes filled with tears. Awesome book!" Patrick McMillan Founder, TeachingHappiness.com Author, An Exercise in Happiness for Ki
Getting to know the Church Fathers means getting to know our own roots. It means knowing more deeply who we are as we learn more and more about who they are. The early Christians are our ancestors, our common genealogy, our family. When we look to our roots, what do we see? That's what Mike Aquilina shows you in this book. The Fathers managed to pull off an amazing achievement. They converted the pagan world in a mere two and a half centuries. They did it without any resources, without any social or political power. They did it with the most primitive communications media. Yet their Church sustained a steady growth rate of 40 percent per decade over the course of those centuries. Maybe there's something we can learn from them. This book is a journey into that world, a tour where your guides are the Fathers.
The essays in this collection deploy biological and social scientific perspectives to evaluate the transformative experience of parenthood for today's women and men. They map the similar and distinct roles mothers and fathers play in their children's lives and measure the effect of gendered parenting on child well-being, work and family arrangements, and the quality of couples' relationships. Contributors describe what happens to brains and bodies when women become mothers and men become fathers; whether the stakes are the same or different for each sex; why, across history and cultures, women are typically more involved in childcare than men; why some fathers are strongly present in their children's lives while others are not; and how the various commitments men and women make to parenting shape their approaches to paid work and romantic relationships. Considering recent changes in men's and women's familial duties, the growing number of single-parent families, and the impassioned tenor of same-sex marriage debates, this book adds sound scientific and theoretical insight to these issues, constituting a standout resource for those interested in the causes and consequences of contemporary gendered parenthood.
When it comes to parenting, more isn’t always better—but it is always more tiring In Japan, a boy sleeps in his parents’ bed until age ten, but still shows independence in all other areas of his life. In rural India, toilet training begins one month after infants are born and is accomplished with little fanfare. In Paris, parents limit the amount of agency they give their toddlers. In America, parents grant them ever more choices, independence, and attention. Given our approach to parenting, is it any surprise that American parents are too frequently exhausted? Over the course of nearly fifty years, Robert and Sarah LeVine have conducted a groundbreaking, worldwide study of how families work. They have consistently found that children can be happy and healthy in a wide variety of conditions, not just the effort-intensive, cautious environment so many American parents drive themselves crazy trying to create. While there is always another news article or scientific fad proclaiming the importance of some factor or other, it’s easy to miss the bigger picture: that children are smarter, more resilient, and more independent than we give them credit for. Do Parents Matter? is an eye-opening look at the world of human nurture, one with profound lessons for the way we think about our families.
In The Secrets of Happy Families, New York Times bestselling author Bruce Feiler has drawn up a blueprint for modern families — a new approach to family dynamics, inspired by cutting-edge techniques gathered from experts in the disciplines of science, business, sports, and the military. The result is a funny and thought-provoking playbook for contemporary families, with more than 200 useful strategies, including: the right way to have family dinner, what your mother never told you about sex (but should have), and why you should always have two women present in difficult conversations… Timely, compassionate, and filled with practical tips and wise advice, Bruce Feiler’s The Secrets of Happy Families: Improve Your Mornings, Rethink Family Dinner, Fight Smarter, Go Out and Play, and Much More should be required reading for all parents.
Traces the history of attempts to explore Mars, describes the successful Pathfinder mission, and presents scientific theories about life on the planet
The Definitive reference on the important role fathers play in child development today Edited by Dr. Michael Lamb—the recognized authority on the role of fathers in child development, The Role of the Father in Child Development, Fifth Edition brings together contributions from international experts on each subject to provide a thorough and current summary of the state of fatherhood across cultures, classes, economic systems, and family formations. This classic guide offers a single-source reference for the most recent findings and beliefs related to fathers and fatherhood. This thoroughly updated new edition provides the latest material on topics such as: The effects of divorce Fathers from low-income backgrounds Stepfathers’ lives: exploring social context and interpersonal complexity Social policy Gay fathers Fatherhood and masculinity The definitive book on when, why, and how fathers matter to their children and families, The Role of the Father in Child Development, Fifth Edition is an essential reference for all mental health professionals who endeavor to understand and support fathers in becoming positive influences in their children’s development.
Citing the pivotal role of a father in a daughter's psychological, physical, and spiritual health, a national speaker on teen issues identifies and describes ten virtues that the author believes can be effectively emulated by today's fathers to promote healthy father-daughter relations and overall well-being in young women. Reprint.

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