This text is designed to acquaint students with some of the main issues associated with the emergence and development of the modern prison. It draws on a range of sociological theorizing in order to analyze the organization and the functioning of the prison. It examines the conditions for the expansion of the prison and explores the possibilities for limiting prison use through the development of alternatives to custody. In particular, it looks in some detail at the relation between imprisonment and class, age, gender and race.
This book is designed to acquaint students with some of the main issues associated with the emergence and development of the modern prison. It draws on a range of sociological theorising in order to analyse the organisation and the functioning of the prison. It examines the conditions for the expansion of the prison and explores the possibilities for limiting prison use through the development of alternatives to custody. In particular, it looks in some detail at the relation between imprisonment and class, age, gender and race.
As the number of prisoners in the UK, USA and elsewhere continues to rise, so have concerns risen about the damaging short term and long term effects this has on prisoners. This book brings together a group of leading authorities in this field, both academics and practitioners, to address the complex issues this has raised, to assess the implications and results of research in this field, and to suggest ways of mitigating the often devastating personal and psychological consequences of imprisonment.
Rehabilitating and Resettling Offenders in the Community isa significant examination of the historical development of workwith offenders and their treatment by the state and society. Itoffers unique perspectives and a wealth of information drawn fromnumerous interviews with probation staff. Highlights how the work of probation staff has changed overtime and the reasons behind these changes Includes discourse with probation staff carried out over manyyears for a comprehensive, ‘insiders’ view of thesituation Focuses on contemporary issues, including the changes broughtin by the Conservative/Liberal Democrat coalition Written by a leading academic with extensive experience in theprobation service
Direct, interpersonal violence is a pervasive, yet often mundane feature of our day-to-day lives; paradoxically, violence is both ordinary and extraordinary. Violence, in other words, is often hidden in plain sight. Space, Place, and Violence seeks to uncover that which is too apparent: to critically question both violent geographies and the geographies of violence. With a focus on direct violence, this book situates violent acts within the context of broader political and structural conditions. Violence, it is argued, is both a social and spatial practice. Adopting a geographic perspective, Space, Place, and Violence provides a critical reading of how violence takes place and also produces place. Specifically, four spatial vignettes – home, school, streets, and community – are introduced, designed so that students may think critically how ‘race’, sex, gender, and class inform violent geographies and geographies of violence.
The International library of Criminology, Criminal Justice and Penology is an important publishing initiative that brings together the most significant contemporary published journal essays in current criminology, criminal justice and penology.
Public policy systems often sustain chronic capacity stress (CCS) meaning they neither excel nor fail in what they do, but do both in ways that are somehow manageable and acceptable. This book is about one archetypal case of CCS – crowding in the British prison system – and how we need a more integrated theoretical understanding of its complexity.
“Few people can talk about prisons with the authority and experience thatAndrew Coyle brings to his subject. A former prison governor, an academicauthor, an international activist and a practical reformer, Professor Coyleknows prisons inside and out, home and abroad, past and present. InUnderstanding Prisons he uses his impressive expertise to guide researchersthrough the changing world of the English prison. The result is an accessible,up-to-date, and highly informative book that will be welcomed by studentsand practitioners alike.” David Garland, NYU, author of The Culture of Control “Andrew Coyle has drawn on his lifelong experience of governing prisons inScotland and England and, as the former Director of the International Centrefor Prison Studies, Kings College, London, studying prisons worldwide. Hehas written a comprehensive account of the use of imprisonment and thecharacter of prisons. He persuasively argues that our continued, extensiveuse of imprisonment cannot simply be explained or justified by the incidenceof crime and could otherwise. His book merits close attention.” Rod Morgan, Chairman, Youth Justice Board There are over nine million men, women and children in prison around the world, and the number of people in prison in England and Wales has increased significantly in recent years. Yet in many respects prison remains the last secretive public institution in our society. Understanding Prisons provides a unique, in-depth examination of prisons – how they function, what they achieve, and their historical and political context. The book: Describes how prisons developed into their present form Looks at who is sent to prison and what happens to them while they are there Explains how the prison system and staff in England and Wales are organised Examines how order and control is maintained and how high security prisons operate Looks at prisoners’ families and the wider community Offers a future vision of the prison system This is essential reading for criminology and sociology students and researchers, criminal justice practitioners, the media and members of the public who are interested in learning more about the closed world of the prison.
This book provides the first systematic study of prison governors - a hidden and powerful, but much neglected, group of criminal justice practitioners. Its focus is on how they carry out their task, how that has changed over time and how their role has evolved. Based on extensive research, including interviews with 42 prison governors, this book also describes the demographic characteristics of the sample of governors interviewed, including their social origins, educational and occupational backgrounds, their motivation for joining the prison service, their career paths, and their values and beliefs. The author goes on to explore how governors provide the necessary management, leadership, regulation and balance to achieve secure, humane and positive institutions. He concludes with a number of important suggestions for changes that should be made to policy and practice in the light of his findings, and explores the implications for how our prisons should be governed in the future.
This book responds to the claim that criminology is becoming socially and politically irrelevant despite its exponential expansion as an academic sub-discipline. It does so by addressing the question 'what is to be done' in relation to a number of major issues associated with crime and punishment. The original contributions to this volume are provided by leading international experts in a wide range of issues. They address imprisonment, drugs, gangs, cybercrime, prostitution, domestic violence, crime control, as well as white collar and corporate crime. Written in an accessible style, this collection aims to contribute to the development of a more public criminology and encourages students and researchers at all levels to engage in a form of criminology that is more socially relevant and more useful.
Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.
Welsh Writing, Political Action and Incarceration examines the prison literature of certain iconic Welsh authors whose political lives and creative writings are linked to ideas about Wales and the Welsh language, the nature of political activism, and the function of incarceration.
"Im Gefängnis San Pedro wurde man nicht von der Polizei belästigt und hatte leichten Zugang zu billigem, reinem Kokain. Einer der besten Orte in Südamerika, um wilde Partys zu feiern." Marschpulver ist ein atemberaubender Bericht über das Leben im bolivianischen Gefängnis San Pedro, in dem Insassen ihre Zellen von Maklern kaufen, Shops und Restaurants führen und Hunderte Frauen und Kinder gemeinsam mit verurteilten Familienmitgliedern innerhalb der Gefängnismauern leben. Korrupte Politiker und Drogenbarone wohnen in Luxusappartements, während die ärmsten Insassen Überfällen und Elend ausgesetzt sind. Teile des Gefängnisses, in denen tagsüber Kindergeschrei zu hören ist, beherbergen nachts Boliviens florierendste Drogenlabors. Doch inmitten von Korruption, Gewalt und dem täglichen Kampf ums Überleben ist Marschpulver auch die Geschichte einer ungleichen Freundschaft, entstanden unter kuriosen Umständen, zwischen Thomas, einem Drogenschmuggler, und dem jungen Anwalt Rusty. Dieser besticht die Wachen, lebt drei Monate lang gemeinsam mit Thomas in einer Zelle und schreibt dessen Erlebnisse auf – entstanden ist die zugleich ungewöhnlichste und spannendste Gefängnis-Story aller Zeiten.
This uniquely comprehensive book provides instructors and students the best of both worlds – a text with carefully selected accompanying readings. Each Section has a 15p. introduction (a "mini-chapter) that contains vignettes, photos, tables and graphs, end of chapter questions and Web-exercises and is followed by 3-4 supporting readings. The theory Section introductions will end with a concluding sub-section that focuses on policy and crime prevention. The theory Sections contain a unique table that compares and contrasts the theories presented in that Section. A "How to Read a Research Article" guide for students appears after the book's Introduction in Section 1, prior to the first reading. The guide refers students to portions of the first reading to illustrate key aspects of a research article. The readings are carefully selected, edited journal articles appropriate for an undergraduate audience. Additional readings will be found on the accompanying Study Site. Full ancillary package with IR CD for instructors and a comprehensive study site for students.
This introduction to the use of crime statistics should be beneficial to anyone involved in the criminal justice system, whether in the police, courts, sentencing, probation or prison service. Criminologists and sociologists may also find it helpful.
First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
"Stigma, shame and hardship---this is the lot shared by families whose young men have been swept into prison. Braman reveals the devastating toll mass incarceration takes on the parents, partners, and children left behind." -Katherine S. Newman "Doing Time on the Outside brings to life in a compelling way the human drama, and tragedy, of our incarceration policies. Donald Braman documents the profound economic and social consequences of the American policy of massive imprisonment of young African American males. He shows us the link between the broad-scale policy changes of recent decades and the isolation and stigma that these bring to family members who have a loved one in prison. If we want to understand fully the impact of current criminal justice policies, this book should be required reading." -Mark Mauer, Assistant Director, The Sentencing Project "Through compelling stories and thoughtful analysis, this book describes how our nation's punishment policies have caused incalculable damage to the fabric of family and community life. Anyone concerned about the future of urban America should read this book." -Jeremy Travis, The Urban Institute In the tradition of Elijah Anderson's Code of the Street and Katherine Newman's No Shame in My Game, this startling new ethnography by Donald Braman uncovers the other side of the incarceration saga: the little-told story of the effects of imprisonment on the prisoners' families. Since 1970 the incarceration rate in the United States has more than tripled, and in many cities-urban centers such as Washington, D.C.-it has increased over five-fold. Today, one out of every ten adult black men in the District is in prison and three out of every four can expect to spend some time behind bars. But the numbers don't reveal what it's like for the children, wives, and parents of prisoners, or the subtle and not-so-subtle effects mass incarceration is having on life in the inner city. Author Donald Braman shows that those doing time on the inside are having a ripple effect on the outside-reaching deep into the family and community life of urban America. Braman gives us the personal stories of what happens to the families and communities that prisoners are taken from and return to. Carefully documenting the effects of incarceration on the material and emotional lives of families, this groundbreaking ethnography reveals how criminal justice policies are furthering rather than abating the problem of social disorder. Braman also delivers a number of genuinely new arguments. Among these is the compelling assertion that incarceration is holding offenders unaccountable to victims, communities, and families. The author gives the first detailed account of incarceration's corrosive effect on social capital in the inner city and describes in poignant detail how the stigma of prison pits family and community members against one another. Drawing on a series of powerful family portraits supported by extensive empirical data, Braman shines a light on the darker side of a system that is failing the very families and communities it seeks to protect.

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