The Social Uses of Literacy: Theory and Practice in Contemporary South Africa challenges state-driven policy and provision in South Africa around the construction of a national delivery system for adult literacy that is part of a programme for Adult Basic Education. The implication is that many people who are the target of this system will be unwilling to participate at the entry point of literacy acquisition unless a reconceptualisation of the nature of literacy use by adults is made. Using fascinating and carefully documented case-study material, this book raises vital questions about literacy and illiteracy, and about adult education. Above all, it questions the efficacy of any literacy programme which fails to acknowledge the many ways in which uneducated and so called 'illiterate' people already use reading, writing and numeracy in their everyday lives.
Written by the lead authors of the C3 Framework, Inquiry-Based Practice in Social Studies Education: Understanding the Inquiry Design Model presents a conceptual base for shaping the classroom experience through inquiry-based teaching and learning. Using their Inquiry Design Model (IDM), the authors present a field-tested approach for ambitious social studies teaching. They do so by providing a detailed account of inquiry's scholarly roots, as well as the rationale for viewing questions, tasks, and sources as inquiry's foundational elements. Based on work done with classroom teachers, university faculty, and state education department personnel, this book encourages readers to transform classrooms into places where inquiry thrives as everyday practice. Both pre-service and in-service teachers are sure to learn strategies for developing the reinforcing elements of IDM, from planning inquiries to communicating conclusions and taking informed action. The curricular and pedagogical examples included make this practical book essential reading for researchers, students of pre-service and in-service methods courses, and professional development programs.
A high level of literacy in both print and digital media is required for negotiating most aspects of 21st-century life, including supporting a family, education, health, civic participation, and competitiveness in the global economy. Yet, more than 90 million U.S. adults lack adequate literacy. Furthermore, only 38 percent of U.S. 12th graders are at or above proficient in reading. Improving Adult Literacy Instruction synthesizes the research on literacy and learning to improve literacy instruction in the United States and to recommend a more systemic approach to research, practice, and policy. The book focuses on individuals ages 16 and older who are not in K-12 education. It identifies factors that affect literacy development in adolescence and adulthood in general, and examines their implications for strengthening literacy instruction for this population. It also discusses technologies for learning that can assist with multiple aspects of teaching, assessment,and accommodations for learning. There is inadequate knowledge about effective instructional practices and a need for better assessment and ongoing monitoring of adult students' proficiencies, weaknesses, instructional environments, and progress, which might guide instructional planning. Improving Adult Literacy Instruction recommends a program of research and innovation to validate, identify the boundaries of, and extend current knowledge to improve instruction for adults and adolescents outside school. The book is a valuable resource for curriculum developers, federal agencies such as the Department of Education, administrators, educators, and funding agencies.
Boys, Masculinities and Reading explores elementary students’ interpretations of their experiences of reading and the contextual influences that impact those experiences. While research continues to highlight the apparent systematic underperformance of boys in comparison to girls on national and international reading benchmarks, this text moves beyond broad generalizations to consider complexities inherent in notions of masculinity and associated tensions. Applying a socio-cultural perspective, Scholes highlights the voices of boys and girls by focusing on their reading experiences. Examining the perceived, generalized "crisis" of boys’ underperformance in reading and literacy, Scholes identifies the factors that shape perceptions of masculinity among different groups of boys across the globe.
This must-read book for all literacy educators illuminates the intersection of research on literacy instruction and teacher evaluation. Since 2009, 46 states have changed or revised policies related to evaluating teachers and school leaders. In order for these new policies to be used to support and develop effective literacy instruction, resources are needed that connect the best of what is known about teaching literacy with current evaluation policies and support practices. A major contribution to meeting this need, the volume brings together a range of perspectives on tools, systems, and policies for the evaluation of teaching, organized into two sections: • Crafting Systems and Policies for Evaluating Literacy Instruction • Examples of Alternative Systems/Approaches for Evaluating Literacy Instruction Across the text, expert scholars in the field emphasize the need for literacy professionals to do more than merely apply generic observation instruments for teacher evaluation, but also to consider how these tools reflect professional values, how elements of effective literacy instruction can be unearthed or included within them, and how teacher evaluation systems and policies can be used to increase students’ opportunities to develop literacy.
This book reviews international research that is particularly relevant to the teaching of English, language and literacy. It locates recent cutting-edge research within theoretical context, drawing on historical perspectives.
In 2004, the Institute of Medicine released Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion, a report on the then-underappreciated challenge of enabling patients to comprehend their condition and treatment, to make the best decisions for their care, and to take the right medications at the right time in the intended dose. That report documented the problems, origins, and consequences of the fact that tens of millions of U.S. adults are unable to read complex texts, including many health-related materials, and it proposed possible solutions to those problems. To commemorate the anniversary of the release of the 2004 health literacy report, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Health Literacy convened a 1-day public workshop to assess the progress made in the field of health literacy over the past decade, the current state of the field, and the future of health literacy at the local, national, and international levels. Health Literacy: Past, Present, and Future summarizes the presentation and discussion of the workshop.
Achieving College Dreams: How a University-Charter District Partnership Created an Early College High School tells the story of a remarkable 10-year collaboration between the University of California, Berkeley and Aspire Public Schools to develop and nurture the California College Preparatory Academy. Bridging the two cultures--artfully described as "Pac-Man (the charter district) meets chess (the university)"--the school serves as an exemplar in providing low-income and first-generation college youth with an excellent and equitable education. Framed by a longitudinal lens, findings from community-engaged scholarship, and a diversity of voices from students to superintendents, this book charts the journey from the initial decision to open a school to the high school graduation of its first two classes. The book captures struggle, improvement, and success as it takes readers inside the workings of the partnership, the development of the school, and the spillover of effects across district and university. Confronting the challenge of interweaving rigor and support, its authors explore such critical ingredients as teacher-student advisories; school transition; the home-school divide; building a supportive college-preparatory culture; teaching with depth, relational power, and equity; the forging of an academic identity; and scaling up. At a time of sharply unequal schools, glaring disparities in college readiness, and heightened expectations, Achieving College Dreams uniquely extends the knowledge base about how to better prepare underserved students for college eligibility and success. The book also calls for universities to step up to the plate as partners with districts to ensure both excellence and equity in secondary education for all children.
As with earlier editions, this latest revision of Information Literacy and Information Skills Instruction: Applying Research to Practice in the 21st Century School Library brings together the research literature on information skills instruction with particular reference to models related to information seeking and the information search process. It presents relevant findings on what research has deemed "best practice" and what is known about how children learn, enabling school librarians to base information skills programs on substantiated data.||The sources reviewed for this book include doctoral dissertations, research reports, academic and professional journal articles in library information service and related fields, and publications by scholars and practitioners relevant to information skills curricula. A preface, newly prepared for the third edition, explains the revision process, while the epilogue examines the importance of communication between research scholars and school library practitioners.
Are there students in your classroom who have hit the reading wall? Studies indicate comprehension regresses in many students once they reach middle school. Teachers need the right resources in their classrooms for engaging students in reading. This book is a veritable encyclopedia of literacy strategies secondary teachers can apply to all content areas immediately. It integrates key strategies, research from top literacy experts, and proven intervention practices.
One of the most important and consistent voices in the reform of science education over the last thirty years has been that of Peter Fensham. His vision of a democratic and socially responsible science education for all has inspired change in schools and colleges throughout the world. Often moving against the tide, Fensham travelled the world to promote his radical ideology. He was appointed Australia's first Professor of Science Education, and was later made a Member of the Order of Australia in recognition of his work in this new and emerging field of study. In this unique book, leading science educators from around the world examine and discuss Fensham's key ideas. Each describes how his arguments, proposals and recommendations have affected their own practice, and extend and modify his message in light of current issues and trends in science education. The result is a vision for the future of science teaching internationally. Academics, researchers and practitioners in science education around the world will find this book a fascinating insight into the life and work of one of the foremost pioneers in science education. The book will also make inspiring reading for postgraduate students of science education.
This book is designed to introduce doctoral and graduate students to the process of conducting scientific research in the social sciences, business, education, public health, and related disciplines. It is a one-stop, comprehensive, and compact source for foundational concepts in behavioral research, and can serve as a stand-alone text or as a supplement to research readings in any doctoral seminar or research methods class. This book is currently used as a research text at universities on six continents and will shortly be available in nine different languages.
Early Childhood Curriculum for All Learners: Integrating Play and Literacy Activities is designed to teach early childhood professionals about the latest research on play and early literacy and then to show them practical methods for adapting this research to everyday classroom practices that will encourage the development of learning skills. The authors link solid, play-based research to specific developmentally appropriate practices. By combining these two areas, the text demonstrates that academic learning and play activities are highly compatible, and that children can and do develop academic skills through play. In addition, the text focuses on socio-dramatic play, a recently acknowledged, essential aspect of child-initiated play interactions. It provides specific strategies that link these interactive behaviors with the early academic skills needed for the initial primary grades. Implementation of the information presented in this book will enable children to experience a richer transition into primary education classrooms.
A new edition of the esteemed nursing text exploring social, cultural and political issues affecting individual and community health What makes a healthy community? And how can nurses and midwives support community health and wellbeing? In Community Health and Wellness, 4th Edition: Primary health care in practice, authors Anne McMurray and Jill Clendon advance the discussion of health as a product of the interaction between people and their environment. Engagingly written and based on extensive research, this valuable nursing textbook is ideal for nursing students as well as those working in the field. Issues such a gender and cultural inclusiveness provide essential backdrops to evidence-based policy, research and the provision of equitable health care for all. The Miller Family case study This new edition of Community Health and Wellness features a common family case study running throughout the text. The Miller family crosses Australia and New Zealand; providing examples of primary health care issues in both countries. These include child health services, accessing care, adolescent health, contemporary family issues, ageing, cultural support and inclusive health care. • global insights with a focus on primary health care practice in Australia and New Zealand • promotion of community health care across the lifespan • a unique socio-ecological approach to community health • the Ottawa Charter, the Jakarta Declaration and the Bangkok Charter are included as contemporary health promotion guidelines for practice • extensive references providing current, specific source information • an emphasis on health literacy, intervention and health promotion • an evolving case study in each chapter, with links to reflective activities • a focus on learning outcomes to facilitate the integration of policy, research and practice • exploration of Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery roles in primary health care practice • strong pedagogy to increase engagement and emphasise key community health issues • reflective exercises and action points encouraging readers to consider key issues, their implications and next steps • research studies exemplifying each chapter’s central theme and promoting evidence-based practice
A Co-Publication of Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. and The International Reading Association This book is a shorter version of the full volume Developing Literacy in Second-Language Learners reporting the findings of the National Literacy Panel on Language-Minority Children and Youth. The Panel – a distinguished group of expert researchers in reading, language, bilingualism, research methods, and education – was appointed to identify, assess, and synthesize research on the literacy education of language-minority children and youth. In this book, chapters adapted from the original report concisely summarize what is known from empirical research about the development of literacy in language-minority children and youth, including development, environment, instruction, and assessment.
How Drama Activates Learning: Contemporary Research and Practice draws together leaders in drama education and applied theatre from across the globe, including authors from Europe, North America and Australasia. It explores how learning can be activated when drama pedagogies and philosophies are applied across diverse contexts and for varied purposes. The areas explored include: · history · literacy, oracy and listening · health and human relationships education · science · democracy, social justice and global citizenship education · bullying and conflict management · criticality · digital technologies · additional language learning Drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives, the contributors present case studies of drama and applied theatre work in school and community settings, providing rich descriptions of practice accompanied by detailed analysis underpinned by the theoretical perspectives of key thinkers from both within and beyond the field of drama.
Ethical issues associated with public health and health policy--related, for example, to pandemic plans and vaccination policies (c.f. SARS or pandemic influenza), preventive measures like screening (e.g. for breast cancer or dementia) or health information campaigns, social inequalities or health care rationing--are increasing in worldwide importance. Evidence-based information for valid benefit-harm assessment is often rare and hard to get for participants in public health interventions. Program implementation often disregards requirements of fair decision-making processes (like public participation, transparency, etc.). Originating from an international conference (based on a call for abstracts and external review), this volume contains contributions from a group of experts from multiple disciplines and countries. It covers (i) conceptual foundations of public health ethics, (ii) methodological approaches and (iii) normative analyses of specific issues and cases. Bridging theoretical foundations with practical applications, this volume provides a valuable resource for researchers, practitioners and students concerned with public health practice and policy.
Schedule constraints and other complicating factors can make face-to-face educational methods inadequate to the needs of learners. Thus, blended learning has emerged as a compromise that reconciles the need for high-tech and high-touch learning and teaching interactions. Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education educates readers across nations and cultures and strengthens their understanding of theories, models, research, applications, best practices, and emerging issues related to blended learning and teaching through a holistic and transcultural perspective. This research volume serves as a valued resource for faculty, administrators, and leaders in postsecondary institutions to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate blended learning programs and courses. It also provides researchers with the latest research in transcultural blended learning and teaching theories, findings, best practices, and emerging trends.

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