Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country offers a fresh interpretation of the history of Navajo (Din�) pastoralism. The dramatic reduction of livestock on the Navajo Reservation in the 1930s -- when hundreds of thousands of sheep, goats, and horses were killed -- was an ambitious attempt by the federal government to eliminate overgrazing on an arid landscape and to better the lives of the people who lived there. Instead, the policy was a disaster, resulting in the loss of livelihood for Navajos -- especially women, the primary owners and tenders of the animals -- without significant improvement of the grazing lands. Livestock on the reservation increased exponentially after the late 1860s as more and more people and animals, hemmed in on all sides by Anglo and Hispanic ranchers, tried to feed themselves on an increasingly barren landscape. At the beginning of the twentieth century, grazing lands were showing signs of distress. As soil conditions worsened, weeds unpalatable for livestock pushed out nutritious native grasses, until by the 1930s federal officials believed conditions had reached a critical point. Well-intentioned New Dealers made serious errors in anticipating the human and environmental consequences of removing or killing tens of thousands of animals. Environmental historian Marsha Weisiger examines the factors that led to the poor condition of the range and explains how the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Navajos, and climate change contributed to it. Using archival sources and oral accounts, she describes the importance of land and stock animals in Navajo culture. By positioning women at the center of the story, she demonstrates the place they hold as significant actors in Native American and environmental history. Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country is a compelling and important story that looks at the people and conditions that contributed to a botched policy whose legacy is still felt by the Navajos and their lands today.
Jeannette Walls ist ein glückliches Kind: Sie hat einen Vater, der mit ihr auf Dämonenjagd geht, ihr die Physik erklärt und die Sterne vom Himmel holt. Da nimmt sie gerne in Kauf, immer mal wieder mit leerem Bauch ins Bett zu gehen, ihre egomanische Künstlermutter zu ertragen oder in Nacht-und-Nebel-Aktionen den Wohnort zu wechseln. Mit den Jahren allerdings werden die sozialen Verhältnisse schlimmer, die Sprüche des Vaters schaler und das Lügengebäude der Eltern so zerbrechlich wie das Schloss aus Glas, das der Vater jahrelang zu bauen versprochen hatte.
Was kommt nach dem Menschen? In Donna Haraways Büchern wimmelt es von Cyborgs, Primaten, Hunden und Tauben. Die Grenze zwischen Mensch und Maschine sowie zwischen Mensch und Tier verschwimmt. In ihrem neuen großen Buch ruft die feministische Theoretikerin das Zeitalter des Chthuluzän aus, das eben nicht - wie im Anthropozän - den Menschen ins Zentrum des Denkens und der Geschichte stellt, sondern das Leben anderer Arten und Kreaturen, seien es Oktopusse, Korallen oder Spinnen. Und nicht nur das: Es sollen neue Beziehungen entstehen, quer zu Vorstellungen biologischer Verwandtschaft. Im Zuge dessen setzt sich Haraway auch mit dem Klimawandel auseinander. Einmal mehr erweist sie sich als eine originelle und radikale Denkerin der Gegenwart.
"A new kind of history of the Southwest (mainly New Mexico and Arizona) that foregrounds the stories of Latino and Indigenous peoples who made the Southwest matter to the nation in the twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.
Verarmte Landarbeiter finden in Oklahoma kein Auskommen mehr. Da hören sie vom gelobten Land Kalifornien und machen sich durch Hitze und Staub auf den Weg. Doch auch hier erfahren sie die Macht und Unterdrückung durch die Großgrundbesitzer. John Steinbeck hat mit diesem Buch seinen literarischen Ruhm begründet. Das Echo in Amerika war bei der Veröffentlichung gewaltig - Gegenschriften wurden verfasst, Politiker und Erzbischöfe verdammten es, der Autor wurde als Volksverhetzer und Klassenkämpfer verurteilt - und als Stimme der Unterdrückten und Ausgebeuteten gefeiert. Sein Roman, der auf ausführlichen Recherchen beruhte, wurde zur Basis von soziologischen Untersuchungen und diente als Vorlage für den gleichnamigen Film von John Ford. 1940 erhielt Steinbeck den Pulitzer-Preis, 1962 den Nobelpreis für Literatur.
A Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2017 At the end of the nineteenth century, Indigenous boarding schools were touted as the means for solving the “Indian problem” in both the United States and Canada. With the goal of permanently transforming Indigenous young people into Europeanized colonial subjects, the schools were ultimately a means for eliminating Indigenous communities as obstacles to land acquisition, resource extraction, and nation-building. Andrew Woolford analyzes the formulation of the “Indian problem” as a policy concern in the United States and Canada and examines how the “solution” of Indigenous boarding schools was implemented in Manitoba and New Mexico through complex chains that included multiple government offices with a variety of staffs, Indigenous peoples, and even nonhuman actors such as poverty, disease, and space. The genocidal project inherent in these boarding schools, however, did not unfold in either nation without diversion, resistance, and unintended consequences. Inspired by the signing of the 2007 Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement in Canada, which provided a truth and reconciliation commission and compensation for survivors of residential schools, This Benevolent Experiment offers a multilayered, comparative analysis of Indigenous boarding schools in the United States and Canada. Because of differing historical, political, and structural influences, the two countries have arrived at two very different responses to the harm caused by assimilative education.
A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.
In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/
The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.
Since the 1950s, the housing developments in the West that historian Lincoln Bramwell calls �wilderburbs� have offered residents both the pleasures of living in nature and the creature comforts of the suburbs. Remote from cities but still within commuting distance, nestled next to lakes and rivers or in forests and deserts, and often featuring spectacular views of public lands, wilderburbs celebrate the natural beauty of the American West and pose a vital threat to it. Wilderburbs tells the story of how roads and houses and water development have transformed the rural landscape in the West. Bramwell introduces readers to developers, homeowners, and government regulators, all of whom have faced unexpected environmental problems in designing and building wilderburb communities, including unpredictable water supplies, threats from wildfires, and encounters with wildlife. By looking at wilderburbs in the West, especially those in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Bramwell uncovers the profound environmental consequences of Americans� desire to live in the wilderness.
The Apostle Islands are a solitary place of natural beauty, with red sandstone cliffs, secluded beaches, and a rich and unique forest surrounded by the cold, blue waters of Lake Superior. But this seemingly pristine wilderness has been shaped and reshaped by humans. The people who lived and worked in the Apostles built homes, cleared fields, and cut timber in the island forests. The consequences of human choices made more than a century ago can still be read in today�s wild landscapes. A Storied Wilderness traces the complex history of human interaction with the Apostle Islands. In the 1930s, resource extraction made it seem like the islands� natural beauty had been lost forever. But as the island forests regenerated, the ways that people used and valued the islands changed - human and natural processes together led to the rewilding of the Apostles. In 1970, the Apostles were included in the national park system and ultimately designated as the Gaylord Nelson Wilderness. How should we understand and value wild places with human pasts? James Feldman argues convincingly that such places provide the opportunity to rethink the human place in nature. The Apostle Islands are an ideal setting for telling the national story of how we came to equate human activity with the loss of wilderness characteristics, when in reality all of our cherished wild places are the products of the complicated interactions between human and natural history. Watch the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frECwkA6oHs
Zwölf Kandidaten, eine Survival-Show, nur einer kann gewinnen – wenn alle anderen aufgeben. Aber dann geschieht, was keiner planen konnte: etwas TÖDLICHES. ›Survive – Du bist allein‹, der Bestseller aus den USA von Alexandra Oliva: ein raffinierter Thriller, der ans Limit geht. Eine junge Frau allein in der Wildnis – eigentlich sollte es nur ein Abenteuer werden. Doch aus diesem Albtraum wird niemand mehr erwachen. Tief in einem felsigen Waldgebiet beginnt die Fernseh-Show: mit zwölf Frauen und Männern, die sorgfältig gecastet wurden, um den Zuschauern etwas zu bieten. Schon bei den ersten Gruppenaufgaben geraten einige Teilnehmer an ihre Grenzen – Orientierungsläufe, Lager bauen, Nahrung finden. Allianzen werden geschmiedet, Konflikte brechen auf, die Prüfungen werden härter und perfider. Und bald muss sich jeder Kandidat ganz allein zu seiner großen Einzel-Challenge aufmachen. Doch keiner ahnt, welch tödliche Gefahr bereits in das Überlebens-Spiel eingebrochen ist. »Kompromisslos und heftig.« Justin Cronin
Was wäre, wenn wir Menschen von einem Tag auf den anderen verschwinden würden? Zum Beispiel morgen. Ein ungeheures Gedankenexperiment! Alan Weisman entwirft das Szenario einer unbevölkerten Erde – gestützt auf das Wissen von Biologen, Geologen, Physikern, Architekten und Ingenieuren und mit atemberaubender Phantasie. Schritt für Schritt vollzieht Weisman nach, wie die Natur unseren Planeten zurückerobert, und führt dem Leser dabei zweierlei vor Augen: was der Mensch in Jahrtausenden zu schaffen vermochte und über welch unerhörte Macht die Natur verfügt.
"Meine Träume sind wirklicher als der Mond, als die Dünen, als alles, was um mich ist." Die Traumdeutung ist ein Muss zu lesen, das die Psychologie als Wissenschaft begründet hat. Wer seine Träume interpretieren und auch theoretisch einordnen will, findet hier die Grundlage.
Eine Leiche wird im Gebüsch an der Eisenbahnlinie gefunden, draußen in der Wüste von Arizona, in der Reservation der Navajo-Indianer. Das FBI und Lieutenant Leaphorn von der Indianerpolizei stehen vor einem Rätsel: Wie konnte der Tote hier in diese Einöde gelangen, an diesen menschenleeren Fleck? Der einzige Hinweis ist eine Notiz in der Tasche des Opfers. Aus ihr geht hervor, daß das Opfer auf dem Weg zu einem «Yeibichai» war, einer nur noch selten abgehaltenen Heilungszeremonie der Navajos ...
From Milwaukee to Madison, Racine to Eau Claire, La Crosse to Sheboygan, and scores of places in between, tradition and progressivism have shaped Wisconsin's architectural landscape. This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians' Buildings of the United States series showcases noteworthy and representative sites across the state's six major regions and seventy-two counties. More than 750 entries canvass the entire Midwestern mosaic, including Frank Lloyd Wright masterpieces, the extraordinary Basilica of St. Josaphat, Yerkes Observatory, Old World Wisconsin, the quirky Wisconsin Concrete Park and Dickeyville Grotto, Aldo Leopold's -shack, - grand theaters, breweries, lighthouses, Northwoods retreats, octagon houses, round barns, and much more. Drawing on the expertise of more than twenty distinguished contributors and the Historic Preservation Office of the Wisconsin Historical Society, this indispensable guide, illustrated with 300 photographs and 32 maps, surveys all of the state's major architectural styles, including exemplary works by locally important designers and nationally noted architects and a wide rage of building types, periods, and influences. Native American effigy mounds and the turtle-shaped Oneida Nation Elementary School express the rich heritage of Wisconsin's indigenous peoples. German farmhouses and mansions, Scandinavian barns, and ethnic churches and fraternal halls testify to the waves of immigration that shaped the state in the nineteenth century. Industrial buildings, company towns and planned communities, parks and historic districts, and modernist skyscrapers exemplify the progressive spirit that held sway throughout the twentieth century. From the vernacular to the spectacular, these sites and structures reveal the state's rich heritage, highlight its contributions to innovative modern design, and illustrate the many ways in which architecture embodies the social, economic, and environmental history of Wisconsin's communities. A volume in the Buildings of the United States series of the Society of Architectural Historians
Der amerikanische Klassiker in neuer Übersetzung Tom und Betsy Rath sind ein junges Paar, sie haben drei gesunde Kinder, ein schönes Zuhause in einem netten Vorort von New York und ein regelmäßiges, wenn auch nicht üppiges Einkommen. Eigentlich haben sie allen Grund, glücklich zu sein. Doch irgendwie sind sie es nicht. Tom pendelt Tag für Tag in die Stadt, wo er einem unspektakulären Bürojob nachgeht – seit er aus dem Krieg zurückgekehrt ist, hat er sich ohnehin verändert, ist verschlossen und launisch. Betsy fühlt sich unverstanden. Nach einem Karriereschritt hat Tom bald keine Zeit mehr für sein Privatleben. Ist es das, was Tom wirklich will? Als er auf einen alten Kameraden aus dem Krieg trifft, gerät sein Alltag vollends aus den Fugen, Tom muss sich seiner Vergangenheit stellen und eine Entscheidung treffen, die sein Leben grundsätzlich verändern wird. ›Der Mann im grauen Flanell‹, im Original 1955 veröffentlicht und sofort ein Bestseller, vermittelt wie wenige andere Romane den Geist der fünfziger Jahre. Zu Recht gilt er als moderner Klassiker und verdient es, zusammen mit den Werken von Richard Yates, John Cheever und Raymond Carver genannt zu werden. Der Buchtitel war so treffend, dass er im Englischen zu einem feststehenden Begriff wurde. Nun liegt der Roman in einer zeitgemäßen deutschen Übersetzung vor.

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