Data-driven dynamical systems is a burgeoning field?it connects how measurements of nonlinear dynamical systems and/or complex systems can be used with well-established methods in dynamical systems theory. This is a critically important new direction because the governing equations of many problems under consideration by practitioners in various scientific fields are not typically known. Thus, using data alone to help derive, in an optimal sense, the best dynamical system representation of a given application allows for important new insights. The recently developed dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is an innovative tool for integrating data with dynamical systems theory. The DMD has deep connections with traditional dynamical systems theory and many recent innovations in compressed sensing and machine learning. Dynamic Mode Decomposition: Data-Driven Modeling of Complex Systems, the first book to address the DMD algorithm, presents a pedagogical and comprehensive approach to all aspects of DMD currently developed or under development; blends theoretical development, example codes, and applications to showcase the theory and its many innovations and uses; highlights the numerous innovations around the DMD algorithm and demonstrates its efficacy using example problems from engineering and the physical and biological sciences; and provides extensive MATLAB code, data for intuitive examples of key methods, and graphical presentations.
Data-driven dynamical systems is a burgeoning field?it connects how measurements of nonlinear dynamical systems and/or complex systems can be used with well-established methods in dynamical systems theory. This is a critically important new direction because the governing equations of many problems under consideration by practitioners in various scientific fields are not typically known. Thus, using data alone to help derive, in an optimal sense, the best dynamical system representation of a given application allows for important new insights. The recently developed dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is an innovative tool for integrating data with dynamical systems theory. The DMD has deep connections with traditional dynamical systems theory and many recent innovations in compressed sensing and machine learning. Dynamic Mode Decomposition: Data-Driven Modeling of Complex Systems, the first book to address the DMD algorithm, presents a pedagogical and comprehensive approach to all aspects of DMD currently developed or under development; blends theoretical development, example codes, and applications to showcase the theory and its many innovations and uses; highlights the numerous innovations around the DMD algorithm and demonstrates its efficacy using example problems from engineering and the physical and biological sciences; and provides extensive MATLAB code, data for intuitive examples of key methods, and graphical presentations.
Combining scientific computing methods and algorithms with modern data analysis techniques, including basic applications of compressive sensing and machine learning, this book develops techniques that allow for the integration of the dynamics of complex systems and big data. MATLAB is used throughout for mathematical solution strategies.
Describes methods revealing the structures and dynamics of turbulence for engineering, physical science and mathematics researchers working in fluid dynamics.
"Analytical System Dynamics: Modeling and Simulation" combines results from analytical mechanics and system dynamics to develop an approach to modeling constrained multidiscipline dynamic systems. This combination yields a modeling technique based on the energy method of Lagrange, which in turn, results in a set of differential-algebraic equations that are suitable for numerical integration. Using the modeling approach presented in this book enables one to model and simulate systems as diverse as a six-link, closed-loop mechanism or a transistor power amplifier.
Data-driven discovery is revolutionizing the modeling, prediction, and control of complex systems. This textbook brings together machine learning, engineering mathematics, and mathematical physics to integrate modeling and control of dynamical systems with modern methods in data science. It highlights many of the recent advances in scientific computing that enable data-driven methods to be applied to a diverse range of complex systems, such as turbulence, the brain, climate, epidemiology, finance, robotics, and autonomy. Aimed at advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in the engineering and physical sciences, the text presents a range of topics and methods from introductory to state of the art.
The first edition of this book was originally published in 1985 under the ti tle "Probabilistic Properties of Deterministic Systems. " In the intervening years, interest in so-called "chaotic" systems has continued unabated but with a more thoughtful and sober eye toward applications, as befits a ma turing field. This interest in the serious usage of the concepts and techniques of nonlinear dynamics by applied scientists has probably been spurred more by the availability of inexpensive computers than by any other factor. Thus, computer experiments have been prominent, suggesting the wealth of phe nomena that may be resident in nonlinear systems. In particular, they allow one to observe the interdependence between the deterministic and probabilistic properties of these systems such as the existence of invariant measures and densities, statistical stability and periodicity, the influence of stochastic perturbations, the formation of attractors, and many others. The aim of the book, and especially of this second edition, is to present recent theoretical methods which allow one to study these effects. We have taken the opportunity in this second edition to not only correct the errors of the first edition, but also to add substantially new material in five sections and a new chapter.
Arising out of the growing interest in and applications of modern dynamical systems theory, this book explores how to derive relatively simple dynamical equations that model complex physical interactions.÷ The author?s objectives are to use sound theory to explore algebraic techniques, develop interesting applications, and discover general modeling principles.÷
This book is an overview of scattering theory. The author shows how this theory provides a parametrization of the continuous spectrum of an elliptic operator on a complete manifold with uniform structure at infinity. In the first two lectures the author describes the simple and fundamental case of the Laplacian on Euclidean space to introduce the theory's basic framework. In the next three lectures, he outlines various results on Euclidean scattering, and the methods used to prove them. In the last three lectures he extends these ideas to non-Euclidean settings.
This book provides a basic introduction to reduced basis (RB) methods for problems involving the repeated solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) arising from engineering and applied sciences, such as PDEs depending on several parameters and PDE-constrained optimization. The book presents a general mathematical formulation of RB methods, analyzes their fundamental theoretical properties, discusses the related algorithmic and implementation aspects, and highlights their built-in algebraic and geometric structures. More specifically, the authors discuss alternative strategies for constructing accurate RB spaces using greedy algorithms and proper orthogonal decomposition techniques, investigate their approximation properties and analyze offline-online decomposition strategies aimed at the reduction of computational complexity. Furthermore, they carry out both a priori and a posteriori error analysis. The whole mathematical presentation is made more stimulating by the use of representative examples of applicative interest in the context of both linear and nonlinear PDEs. Moreover, the inclusion of many pseudocodes allows the reader to easily implement the algorithms illustrated throughout the text. The book will be ideal for upper undergraduate students and, more generally, people interested in scientific computing. All these pseudocodes are in fact implemented in a MATLAB package that is freely available at https://github.com/redbkit
This is the first textbook on a generally applicable control strategy for turbulence and other complex nonlinear systems. The approach of the book employs powerful methods of machine learning for optimal nonlinear control laws. This machine learning control (MLC) is motivated and detailed in Chapters 1 and 2. In Chapter 3, methods of linear control theory are reviewed. In Chapter 4, MLC is shown to reproduce known optimal control laws for linear dynamics (LQR, LQG). In Chapter 5, MLC detects and exploits a strongly nonlinear actuation mechanism of a low-dimensional dynamical system when linear control methods are shown to fail. Experimental control demonstrations from a laminar shear-layer to turbulent boundary-layers are reviewed in Chapter 6, followed by general good practices for experiments in Chapter 7. The book concludes with an outlook on the vast future applications of MLC in Chapter 8. Matlab codes are provided for easy reproducibility of the presented results. The book includes interviews with leading researchers in turbulence control (S. Bagheri, B. Batten, M. Glauser, D. Williams) and machine learning (M. Schoenauer) for a broader perspective. All chapters have exercises and supplemental videos will be available through YouTube.
The domain of nonlinear dynamical systems and its mathematical underpinnings has been developing exponentially for a century, the last 35 years seeing an outpouring of new ideas and applications and a concomitant confluence with ideas of complex systems and their applications from irreversible thermodynamics. A few examples are in meteorology, ecological dynamics, and social and economic dynamics. These new ideas have profound implications for our understanding and practice in domains involving complexity, predictability and determinism, equilibrium, control, planning, individuality, responsibility and so on. Our intention is to draw together in this volume, we believe for the first time, a comprehensive picture of the manifold philosophically interesting impacts of recent developments in understanding nonlinear systems and the unique aspects of their complexity. The book will focus specifically on the philosophical concepts, principles, judgments and problems distinctly raised by work in the domain of complex nonlinear dynamical systems, especially in recent years. -Comprehensive coverage of all main theories in the philosophy of Complex Systems -Clearly written expositions of fundamental ideas and concepts -Definitive discussions by leading researchers in the field -Summaries of leading-edge research in related fields are also included
Unifying Themes in Complex Systems is a well-established series of carefully edited conference proceedings that serve to document and archive the progress made regarding cross-fertilization in this field. The International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS) creates a unique atmosphere for scientists from all fields, engineers, physicians, executives, and a host of other professionals, allowing them to explore common themes and applications of complex systems science. With this new volume, Unifying Themes in Complex Systems continues to establish common ground between the wide-ranging domains of complex systems science.
The new edition of an introductory text that teaches students the art of computational problem solving, covering topics ranging from simple algorithms to information visualization.
Describes computational methods for parametric and nonparametric modeling of stochastic dynamics. Aimed at graduate students, and suitable for self-study.
Online fault diagnosis is crucial to ensure safe operation of complex dynamic systems in spite of faults affecting the system behaviors. Consequences of the occurrence of faults can be severe and result in human casualties, environmentally harmful emissions, high repair costs, and economical losses caused by unexpected stops in production lines. The majority of real systems are hybrid dynamic systems (HDS). In HDS, the dynamical behaviors evolve continuously with time according to the discrete mode (configuration) in which the system is. Consequently, fault diagnosis approaches must take into account both discrete and continuous dynamics as well as the interactions between them in order to perform correct fault diagnosis. This book presents recent and advanced approaches and techniques that address the complex problem of fault diagnosis of hybrid dynamic and complex systems using different model-based and data-driven approaches in different application domains (inductor motors, chemical process formed by tanks, reactors and valves, ignition engine, sewer networks, mobile robots, planetary rover prototype etc.). These approaches cover the different aspects of performing single/multiple online/offline parametric/discrete abrupt/tear and wear fault diagnosis in incremental/non-incremental manner, using different modeling tools (hybrid automata, hybrid Petri nets, hybrid bond graphs, extended Kalman filter etc.) for different classes of hybrid dynamic and complex systems.
The book focuses on the physical and mathematical foundations of model-based turbulence control: reduced-order modelling and control design in simulations and experiments. Leading experts provide elementary self-consistent descriptions of the main methods and outline the state of the art. Covered areas include optimization techniques, stability analysis, nonlinear reduced-order modelling, model-based control design as well as model-free and neural network approaches. The wake stabilization serves as unifying benchmark control problem.
Dynamic Systems Biology Modeling and Simuation consolidates and unifies classical and contemporary multiscale methodologies for mathematical modeling and computer simulation of dynamic biological systems – from molecular/cellular, organ-system, on up to population levels. The book pedagogy is developed as a well-annotated, systematic tutorial – with clearly spelled-out and unified nomenclature – derived from the author’s own modeling efforts, publications and teaching over half a century. Ambiguities in some concepts and tools are clarified and others are rendered more accessible and practical. The latter include novel qualitative theory and methodologies for recognizing dynamical signatures in data using structural (multicompartmental and network) models and graph theory; and analyzing structural and measurement (data) models for quantification feasibility. The level is basic-to-intermediate, with much emphasis on biomodeling from real biodata, for use in real applications. Introductory coverage of core mathematical concepts such as linear and nonlinear differential and difference equations, Laplace transforms, linear algebra, probability, statistics and stochastics topics; PLUS ....... The pertinent biology, biochemistry, biophysics or pharmacology for modeling are provided, to support understanding the amalgam of “math modeling” with life sciences. Strong emphasis on quantifying as well as building and analyzing biomodels: includes methodology and computational tools for parameter identifiability and sensitivity analysis; parameter estimation from real data; model distinguishability and simplification; and practical bioexperiment design and optimization. Companion website provides solutions and program code for examples and exercises using Matlab, Simulink, VisSim, SimBiology, SAAMII, AMIGO, Copasi and SBML-coded models. A full set of PowerPoint slides are available from the author for teaching from his textbook. He uses them to teach a 10 week quarter upper division course at UCLA, which meets twice a week, so there are 20 lectures. They can easily be augmented or stretched for a 15 week semester course. Importantly, the slides are editable, so they can be readily adapted to a lecturer’s personal style and course content needs. The lectures are based on excerpts from 12 of the first 13 chapters of DSBMS. They are designed to highlight the key course material, as a study guide and structure for students following the full text content. The complete PowerPoint slide package (~25 MB) can be obtained by instructors (or prospective instructors) by emailing the author directly, at: [email protected]
Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) is a relatively new research area which describes the methods and approaches used to supply quantitative descriptions of the effects of uncertainty, variability and errors in simulation problems and models. It is rapidly becoming a field of increasing importance, with many real-world applications within statistics, mathematics, probability and engineering, but also within the natural sciences. Literature on the topic has up until now been largely based on polynomial chaos, which raises difficulties when considering different types of approximation and does not lead to a unified presentation of the methods. Moreover, this description does not consider either deterministic problems or infinite dimensional ones. This book gives a unified, practical and comprehensive presentation of the main techniques used for the characterization of the effect of uncertainty on numerical models and on their exploitation in numerical problems. In particular, applications to linear and nonlinear systems of equations, differential equations, optimization and reliability are presented. Applications of stochastic methods to deal with deterministic numerical problems are also discussed. Matlab® illustrates the implementation of these methods and makes the book suitable as a textbook and for self-study. Discusses the main ideas of Stochastic Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification using Functional Analysis Details listings of Matlab® programs implementing the main methods which complete the methodological presentation by a practical implementation Construct your own implementations from provided worked examples
An in-depth introduction to subspace methods for system identification in discrete-time linear systems thoroughly augmented with advanced and novel results, this text is structured into three parts. Part I deals with the mathematical preliminaries: numerical linear algebra; system theory; stochastic processes; and Kalman filtering. Part II explains realization theory as applied to subspace identification. Stochastic realization results based on spectral factorization and Riccati equations, and on canonical correlation analysis for stationary processes are included. Part III demonstrates the closed-loop application of subspace identification methods. Subspace Methods for System Identification is an excellent reference for researchers and a useful text for tutors and graduate students involved in control and signal processing courses. It can be used for self-study and will be of interest to applied scientists or engineers wishing to use advanced methods in modeling and identification of complex systems.

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