Fifteen original research accounts are described by the experienced early childhood professionals who carried them out. The research focuses on early childhood services and settings; gender and disability issues in provision and play and on how adults influence children's learning. Each account also identifies methodological issues and suggests further reading. The contributors work in a variety of settings and services in and outside the UK. The issues researched include: playgroups in the 21st Century; practitioners' responses to legislative change; the involvement of qualified teachers in voluntary pre-school; transferring from a Montessori nursery to a state reception class; men in the early childhood workforce; gender discourses in children's homes; gender through the eyes of girls; including young children with disabilities; working with under threes; children's drawings; children's reading choices; adults' perceptions of play; children's acquisition of thinking skills; reflective practice in early years work. The book is written for students researching in the ever expanding field of early childhood education and care and for the wide range of practitioners seeking to underpin their practice with current research.
Harry Morgan lays the foundations of what early childhood education is by integrating the history of the field with the philosophy and theories behind this discipline. With lucid and engaging prose, Morgan delineates the beginnings of early childhood education and how it has become an important field of study in education today. In this updated edition, a new chapter about critical race theory and its implications on early childhood education has been included.
Comprehensive and authoritative, this forward-thinking book reviews the breadth of current knowledge about early education and identifies important priorities for practice and policy. Robert C. Pianta and his associates bring together foremost experts to examine what works in promoting all children's school readiness and social-emotional development in preschool and the primary grades. Exemplary programs, instructional practices, and professional development initiatives—and the systems needed to put them into place—are described. The volume presents cutting-edge findings on the family and social context of early education and explores ways to strengthen collaboration between professionals and parents.
Early childhood education and child care are now widely perceived to be among the central social needs of the nation. Used by more than 100 universities and colleges, the new second edition of this anthology is a collection of over 70 articles which together provide a comprehensive overview of the early childhood situation from a historical, theoretical and practical perspective. These articles enable the reader to understand human development in young children, identify their intellectual strengths and weaknesses, and develop the most effective teaching techniques. Also included is a review of events and conditions resulting in current educational practices. Classroom theory and techniques are examined not only within the U.S., but also run the gamut from the Israeli kibbutz program to current teaching practices in the Soviet Union and China. Contents: National and Historical Perspectives; Philosophical and Theoretical Issues; Critical Issues; Exceptional Children; Curric
This book speaks to the heart of an urgent task facing teacher preparation programs on campuses at the beginning of the twenty-first century: How can college instructors work most effectively with a new generation of nontraditional students that includes growing numbers of immigrants, single parents, and returning homemakers struggling to find their way in large and unfamiliar institutions? Susan Bernheimer went straight to the source for answers, interviewing impoverished students aspiring to become teachers of young children. Revealing, poignant, and replete with practical insights about learning and inclusion, the students' words reflect their desire to become teachers - a desire hidden beneath their fears and silence. Their stories, testaments to courage and faith, remind us of the pivotal role of the classroom teacher at all levels of education. In a book filled with student narratives, classroom vignettes, and instructional strategies, Bernheimer shows rather than tells, inspires rather than judges. She blends research and interviews with her own classroom experience and urges educators to integrate students' lives and voices into the curriculum. "New Possibilities for Early Childhood Education" offers an inside perspective and a new vision for all classroom teachers.
This collection of papers provides a useful resource for scholars who need to ground their own study in a wider historical and global discourses concerning the education of children under eight.
"This book focuses on early childhood education which spans the human life from birth to age eight. Infants and toddlers experience life more holistically than any other age group. Social, emotional, cognitive, language, and physical lessons are not learned separately by very young children. Adults who are most helpful to young children interact in ways that understand that the child is learning from the whole experience, not just that part of the experience to which the adult gives attention. Although early childhood education does not have to occur in the absence of the parent or primary caregiver, this term is sometimes used to denote education by someone other than these the parent or primary caregiver. Both research in the field and early childhood educators view the parents as an integral part of the early childhood education process. Early childhood education takes many forms depending on the theoretical and educational beliefs of the educator or parent. Other terms that is often used interchangeably with "early childhood education" are "early childhood learning", "early care" and "early education". Much of the first two years of life are spent in the creation of a child's first "sense of self" or the building of a first identity. Because this is a crucial part of children's makeup - how they first see themselves, how they think they should function, how they expect others to function in relation to them, early care must ensure that in addition to carefully selected and trained caregivers, links with family, home culture, and home language are a central part of program policy. If care becomes a substitute for, rather than a support of, family, children may develop a less-than-positive sense of who they are and where they come from because of their child care experience."--PUBLISHER'S WEBSITE.
This book presents social and cultural perspectives on current theories of learning in early childhood education.
The basic premise of this book is simple - it brings together early childhood and cultural-studies professionals who are willing to provide a kaleidoscope of views capable of challenging the sanctity of the early childhood western lens. Marianne Bloch, Hedy Chang, Amos Hatch, Henry Giroux, Jan Jipson, Joe Kincheloe, Shirley Kessler, Sally Lubeck, Shirley Steinberg, Beth Blue Swadener, Nila Rinehardt, and Lourdes Diaz Soto call for a move toward the critical, toward the multicultural, toward the dialogic, toward the feminist, toward the personal, with the others, with the silenced, and in solidarity with multiple players.
`This book makes an important contribution to the theory of early childhood education. It is well-written, well-researched and successfully links theoretical issues with practical implementation' - International Journal of Early Years Education Taking account of the changes in early childhood education imposed by the arrival of The National Curriculum, the contributors to this book believe that early childhood education is distinctive and has its own standards of excellence. The book sets out to show how to combine knowledge of child development, curriculum planning, and the role of subject-knowledge, in order to make adequate educational provision, from a developmental point of view.
"Tina Bruce is one of the foremost figures thinking and writing about Early Years education at the moment ... I present Early Childhood Education to my students as a modern classic". Fran Paffard, University of Cumbria Early Childhood Education, 4th edition, is the new edition of the classic early years textbook by Tina Bruce. The book draws on the history of Early Years pioneering educators and classic educational theories and places them in the context of modern developments in psychology and sociology to set out a practical and readable text, packed with new and specially commissioned photographs, that provides a framework for Early Years education. This new edition has been fully revised with new photography and updated to include the latest developments in thinking and practice. The book, as always, retains Tina Bruce's characteristic accessible and thoughtful writing style. This will be an invaluable text for you if you are studying Early Years education as part of an Early Childhood Studies degree, an Early Years Foundation Degree, you are working towards Early Years Professional Status, or are a manager or Headteacher within the Early Years sector.
INCLUSIVE EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: DEVELOPMENT, RESOURCES, AND PRACTICE, Sixth Edition, is a comprehensive special education resource book that provides essential information on a variety of early childhood learning disabilities, as well as strategies for including children with these special needs in regular educational settings. The author provides students with a solid grounding in theory and research, as well as practical guidelines, real-world vignettes, and hands-on program planning assistance to prepare them to integrate children with learning disabilities into their classrooms. Updated throughout, this edition also introduces videos that are available for viewing at the Early Childhood Education Media Library, allowing students to see text concepts brought to life in real classroom settings. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
This book explores key policy issues related to early childhood education. Through the contributions of various professionals in the field, the editors provide a vision, practical and possible, of early childhood education in the 1990s. Part I delves into the complex world, both personal and professional, of the classroom teacher. The essays in Part II look at issues of the school community, including the roles of class, race, gender, and exceptionality. Finally, Part III examines the relationship between schools and the community-at-large, and how complex issues find their way into social and economic policies that often stifle, rather than support, the democratic vision of American schools. Taken as a whole, the volume presents a stimulating discussion of the current state of early childhood education policy and practice.
This book offers an academic, critical approach to theories underpinning current practice in early childhood care and education.

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