When Edie was first published, it quickly became an international bestseller and then took its place among the classic books about the 1960s. Edie Sedgwick exploded into the public eye like a comet. She seemed to have it all: she was aristocratic and glamorous, vivacious and young, Andy Warhol’s superstar. But within a few years she flared out as quickly as she had appeared, and before she turned twenty-nine she was dead from a drug overdose. In a dazzling tapestry of voices—family, friends, lovers, rivals—the entire meteoric trajectory of Edie Sedgwick’s life is brilliantly captured. And so is the Pop Art world of the ‘60s: the sex, drugs, fashion, music—the mad rush for pleasure and fame. All glitter and flash on the outside, it was hollow and desperate within—like Edie herself, and like her mentor, Andy Warhol. Alternately mesmerizing, tragic, and horrifying, this book shattered many myths about the ‘60s experience in America.
Drawn from firsthand accounts and featuring hundreds of never-before-published portraits, ad shoots, and candid snapshots, this revealing look at the life of Edie Sedgwick, the "it" girl of the Andy Warhol Factory scene, details her many roles as a model, film star, socialite, friend, lover, and drug addict.
Hello! My name is Edie. I am EVER so helpful. In fact I think helping is one of the things i am best at. Edie certainly is a very good helper, whether it's helping Mummy wake up bright and early, helping Daddy to get everything at the shops or helping her little brother with sharing and knowing what's what. Sophy Henn's Edie is a stunning and stylish picture book that will be instantly familiar to parents and small children
Eleven-year-old Edie Jasmine Snow has a "perfect" thirteen-year-old sister, two loving parents, and a cat named Dusty. She also has a grandmother she suspects is a witch and a grandfather who insists on calling her Albert. Framed by family summer vacations at the lake, All-Season Edie follows Edie through a tumultuous year in which her beloved grandfather becomes ill. In the face of family tragedy, Edie tries to practice witchcraft, learns to dance the flamenco, meets the Greek god Zeus doing his Christmas shopping at the mall, ruins the most important party of her sister's life and realizes that her family is both completely strange and absolutely normal.
The Committee had, unquestionably, made a mistake. There was no doubt that Edie had achieved the long-sought cancer cure ... but awarding the Nobel Prize was, nonetheless, a mistake ...Note: super short
In this remarkably prescient short tale from the Golden Age of science fiction, author J.F. Bone probes the ethical dimensions of humanity's increasing reliance on artificial intelligence. The twist ending will leave readers pondering this dilemma long after the final page is turned.
Even if she has lived ten terrible years, terrible, horrible Edie really isn’t terrible and horrible at all, but rather one of the most charming and engaging and gutsy children in American children’s fiction. It’s true of course that Edie does get into—and not always without it being at least a little bit her fault—some pretty terrible and horrible scrapes, and that sometimes she will sulk, but these are the kinds of things that happen to the kid sister of two snooty boys and one fancy-pants girl, not to mention having to deal with the distraction of two half sisters who are no better than babies. Edie’s father and stepmother have headed to Europe for the summer, and though the rest of the family can look forward to good times at a beloved summer house on the sea, Edie still has to fight to hold her own. Adventures on a sailboat and on an island, and the advent of a major hurricane and what Edie takes to be a military coup, all come to a climax when Edie solves the mystery of who stole the neighbor’s jewels and saves, at least for one day, the day. This story of Edie and the other members of the Cares family may remind readers of Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons, except that Edie has an experimental, even anarchic streak that is all her terrible, horrible own.
Two separate love stories feature in this book. Although set in different ages - the first is set during the First World War, the second is contemporary - both tales are written from the perspective of independently minded women.
Letters of Little Edie Beale: Grey Gardens and Beyond, collected and edited by Walter Newkirk, is a sequel to memoraBEALEia: A Private Scrapbook About Little Edie Beale of Grey Gardens. For more information, visit the website www.greygardensbook.com The book has approximately 100 transcripts of the most engaging and entertaining cards and letters written to Walter Newkirk by Edie Beale from 1977-1987 and from 2000 until a few months before Edie's death in 2002. In her letters Edie discusses politics, 9/11, Cher, Elian Gonzalez, the Grey Gardens documentary and musical, Jackie Kennedy Onassis and Lee Radziwill, politics, and more. Miss Beale is best known for her participation in Grey Gardens (1976). In the early 1970s, Edie and her mother Edith Bouvier Beale -- cousin and aunt of Mrs. Onassis s - were living in a filthy, crumbling estate called Grey Gardens in East Hampton, NY which was raided by health authorities . The documentary inspired a Broadway musical in 2006 by Doug Wright, Michael Korie and Scott Frankel, which nominated for 10 Tony Awards, and won 3 awards. A "new" Grey Gardens, starring Drew Barrymore as Little Edie and Jessica Lange as Big Edie, was broadcast on HBO during April and May 2009 and is now available on DVD. The film was nominated for 17 Emmy Awards and won the Television Critic's Award for Best Television Movie. On April 22, 1976 Walter Newkirk traveled to Grey Gardens, to interview Edie Beale about t Grey Gardens, for his college newspaper, The Rutgers Daily Targum. Newkirk and Beale kept in touch for several years, by phone and by mail. After and her mother died, Beale moved to New York (1980-1983) and the author escorted her to luncheons, and special events. Little Edie moved to Florida in 1983, and died there in January 2002.
Jack Frost's goblins are trying to prevent the Green Fairies from doing their jobs properly...believing that they are the only green creatures in the world! But Rachel and Kirsty are determined to create a nature garden, with the help of Edie the Garden Fairy!
An exclusive free edition of this stunning short mystery set in the frozen high Arctic and featuring the most compelling new heroine in crime fiction: ex polar bear hunter Edie Kiglatuk. Also includes the opening chapters of M. J. McGrath's new book The Boy in the Snow. The shortest day of the year didn’t count for much up on Ellesmere Island. By the time 21 December arrived, the sun hadn’t come up for two months and it would be another two before it managed to scramble over the High Arctic horizon. Objects, animals and even people could disappear during the Great Dark without anyone much noticing. Which was why no one reported Tommy Qataq missing . . . Christmas is fast approaching on Ellesmere Island, in the vast frozen landscape of the High Arctic, and half Inuit ex polar bear hunter Edie Kiglatuk is drawn into a mystery when a young man dies in suspicious circumstances. A stunning short mystery with a magical and heart-wrenching twist, Edie Kiglatuk's Christmas is from the CWA Dagger Award nominated author of White Heat and The Boy In the Snow and will be enjoyed by fans of Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow by Peter Hoeg and Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie series. Praise for M. J. McGrath: 'Acknowledged as one of our most gifted younger writers, McGrath’s first thriller - featuring Arctic guide Edie Kiglatuk - was the exceptional White Heat, published last year to deserved acclaim. This second confirms just how good this Essex-born writer with a taste for Alaska really is . . . The snow-laden wastes of Alaska are so brilliantly evoked that it almost make you shiver reading it, and the plot is every bit as chilling, laced as it is with politics, sects and modern greed' Daily Mail ‘Encountering Edie Kiglatuk, the toughest, smartest Arctic heroine since Miss Smilla, left me with that rare feeling of privilege you get on meeting extraordinary people in real life. A huge achievement’ Liz Jensen, author of The Rapture ‘Outstanding...This affecting novel should melt even the most frozen human hearts’ Starred Publishers Weekly review ‘A thrilling chiller...This is turning into a series that readers will want to follow with close attention’ Barry Forshaw, Daily Express ‘A chilling read...White Heat most resembles Peter Høeg's 1993 novel, Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow’ Evening Standard ‘Edie is an ingenious and original creation...But the most addictive character is the Arctic itself. It makes a seductive location for a thriller...For those seeking a palate cleanser after the sensationalist high-violence of Stieg Larsson, this compelling tale of ice and intrigue should be high on their list’ Sunday Telegraph ‘The best thing about female-authored thrillers is their ballsy heroines – and White Heat by MJ McGrath is no exception...Dark and atmospheric, it’s an unusual twist on the usual crime novel’ Cosmopolitan
From the author of The Gone-Away World - an exhilarating espionage murder-mystery. There has been a strange death in the quiet village of Shrewton: old Donny Caspian has lost his head. In the Copper Kettle tea rooms, Tom Rice, a junior nobody from the Treasury, puzzles over the details of the case. He has been sent by his superiors to oversee the investigation, but is he supposed to help or hinder? At the next table, octogenarian superspy Edie Banister nibbles a slice of cake and struggles not to become Miss Marple. But what is the connection between the two? Who killed Donny Caspian, and why? Taking in Rice's present and Edie's daring past, from duels on shipboard to death in back alleys, 'Edie Investigates' is a superb short story from the incomparable Nick Harkaway. Also included with this short, the first chapter of Nick Harkaway's long-awaited new novel Angelmaker.
Born in a small town in northern North Dakota, Edie Peterson grew up during the 1920s and 1930s. After her father’s death, she and seven siblings were reared by her widowed mother surviving extremes of weather, poverty, the Great Depression, Prohibition, and the Dust Bowl. Married in 1938, she and her husband had no choice but to leave home for the west coast in search of jobs. As the country struggled to overcome the Depression and became embroiled in World War II they traveled where they found work, eventually settling in Oregon. Edie’s Story is a chronicle of her experiences during those historic times.
In December 1922 Edith Thompson, a smart, bright, lower-middle class woman who worked in a milliner's shop, was tried for conspiring with her young lover Frederick Bywaters to murder her husband, Percy. The sensational trial, which took place in front of heaving crowds at the Old Bailey, unravelled a real life drama as exciting as any blockbuster: an illicit love affair, a back-street abortion, domestic violence, murder and a double execution. Fred and Edie draws together powerful threads between personal memory and public lives, between innocence and responsibility, and between fact and fiction. It is an exploration of a woman caught in the net of her own private fantasy and the conflicts of the era in which she lived, of her muddled attempt to defy convention and reshape her own destiny, and, finally, of the devastation she left in her wake.
She was riveting to look at, a sprite of the zeitgeist, the living distillation of the over-amped vision of New York in the mid-sixties. Like many exotic creatures that Andy Warhol shed his light on, she initially bloomed—became the symbol for all that was hip and stylish—and just as quickly began to disintegrate. Told with unsparing candor, and with images that capture her at the peak of her Factory stardom,Edie Factory Girlis the short but enduring cultural story of Edie Sedgwick—releasing in time for the film of the same name starring Sienna Miller, and including rare photos of Miller as Edie. David Dalton was just a teen when he became one of Warhol’s first assistants, and was present for the arrival of Edie: witnessing her rise, her Factory superstardom, and subsequent unraveling. Like an anthropologist thrown together with a tribe of “wild” people, Nat Finkelstein entered the Factory just as Warhol was emerging as the supreme catalyst of the sixties. Among the freaky menagerie, Nat found Andy’s misbegotten princess the most fascinating and enigmatic character of her time, and with a compassionate lens recorded her fragile, fleeting beauty.Edie Factory Girlis a privileged glimpse into Warhol’s inner sanctum, via revealing interviews with intimates, friends, and scenesters, in which Edie orbits around the likes of Bob Dylan, Salvador Dali, Betsey Johnson, Lou Reed, Judy Garland, and many more, before departing as quickly as she came.
Rancho Caada de Guadalupe, La Visitacion y Rodeo Viejo was named in July 1777 by a party of Spanish priests and soldiers who lost their way in heavy fog while en route to the Presidio. Now called Visitacion Valley, this area was the only Mexican land grant within San Francisco deeded to an Anglo. Windmills pumped water to irrigate the fields of early settlers cattle farms, nurseries, and vegetable gardens, leading to the nickname Valley of the Windmills. Over the years, however, the pastoral scenery gave way to a mix of housing and commerce, and today Visitacion Valley is one of the citys most ethnically diverse neighborhoods.

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