Autism is a word most of us are familiar with. But do we really know what it means? Children with autism are challenged by the most essential human behaviors. They have difficulty interacting with other people-often failing to see people as people rather than simply objects in their environment. They cannot easily communicate ideas and feelings, have great trouble imagining what others think or feel, and in some cases spend their lives speechless. They frequently find it hard to make friends or even bond with family members. Their behavior can seem bizarre. Education is the primary form of treatment for this mysterious condition. This means that we place important responsibilities on schools, teachers and children's parents, as well as the other professionals who work with children with autism. With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1975, we accepted responsibility for educating children who face special challenges like autism. While we have since amassed a substantial body of research, researchers have not adequately communicated with one another, and their findings have not been integrated into a proven curriculum. Educating Children with Autism outlines an interdisciplinary approach to education for children with autism. The committee explores what makes education effective for the child with autism and identifies specific characteristics of programs that work. Recommendations are offered for choosing educational content and strategies, introducing interaction with other children, and other key areas. This book examines some fundamental issues, including: How children's specific diagnoses should affect educational assessment and planning How we can support the families of children with autism Features of effective instructional and comprehensive programs and strategies How we can better prepare teachers, school staffs, professionals, and parents to educate children with autism What policies at the federal, state, and local levels will best ensure appropriate education, examining strategies and resources needed to address the rights of children with autism to appropriate education. Children with autism present educators with one of their most difficult challenges. Through a comprehensive examination of the scientific knowledge underlying educational practices, programs, and strategies, Educating Children with Autism presents valuable information for parents, administrators, advocates, researchers, and policy makers.
Autism is a word most of us are familiar with. But do we really know what it means? Children with autism are challenged by the most essential human behaviors. They have difficulty interacting with other people-often failing to see people as people rather than simply objects in their environment. They cannot easily communicate ideas and feelings, have great trouble imagining what others think or feel, and in some cases spend their lives speechless. They frequently find it hard to make friends or even bond with family members. Their behavior can seem bizarre. Education is the primary form of treatment for this mysterious condition. This means that we place important responsibilities on schools, teachers and children's parents, as well as the other professionals who work with children with autism. With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1975, we accepted responsibility for educating children who face special challenges like autism. While we have since amassed a substantial body of research, researchers have not adequately communicated with one another, and their findings have not been integrated into a proven curriculum. Educating Children with Autism outlines an interdisciplinary approach to education for children with autism. The committee explores what makes education effective for the child with autism and identifies specific characteristics of programs that work. Recommendations are offered for choosing educational content and strategies, introducing interaction with other children, and other key areas. This book examines some fundamental issues, including: How children's specific diagnoses should affect educational assessment and planning How we can support the families of children with autism Features of effective instructional and comprehensive programs and strategies How we can better prepare teachers, school staffs, professionals, and parents to educate children with autism What policies at the federal, state, and local levels will best ensure appropriate education, examining strategies and resources needed to address the rights of children with autism to appropriate education. Children with autism present educators with one of their most difficult challenges. Through a comprehensive examination of the scientific knowledge underlying educational practices, programs, and strategies, Educating Children with Autism presents valuable information for parents, administrators, advocates, researchers, and policy makers.
Autism is a word most of us are familiar with. But do we really know what it means? Children with autism are challenged by the most essential human behaviors. They have difficulty interacting with other people-often failing to see people as people rather than simply objects in their environment. They cannot easily communicate ideas and feelings, have great trouble imagining what others think or feel, and in some cases spend their lives speechless. They frequently find it hard to make friends or even bond with family members. Their behavior can seem bizarre. Education is the primary form of treatment for this mysterious condition. This means that we place important responsibilities on schools, teachers and children's parents, as well as the other professionals who work with children with autism. With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1975, we accepted responsibility for educating children who face special challenges like autism. While we have since amassed a substantial body of research, researchers have not adequately communicated with one another, and their findings have not been integrated into a proven curriculum. Educating Children with Autism outlines an interdisciplinary approach to education for children with autism. The committee explores what makes education effective for the child with autism and identifies specific characteristics of programs that work. Recommendations are offered for choosing educational content and strategies, introducing interaction with other children, and other key areas. This book examines some fundamental issues, including: How children's specific diagnoses should affect educational assessment and planning How we can support the families of children with autism Features of effective instructional and comprehensive programs and strategies How we can better prepare teachers, school staffs, professionals, and parents to educate children with autism What policies at the federal, state, and local levels will best ensure appropriate education, examining strategies and resources needed to address the rights of children with autism to appropriate education. Children with autism present educators with one of their most difficult challenges. Through a comprehensive examination of the scientific knowledge underlying educational practices, programs, and strategies, Educating Children with Autism presents valuable information for parents, administrators, advocates, researchers, and policy makers.
Createan appropriate learning environment to help children with ASD develop lifelongindependence!
According to the CDC, one in fifty American children is diagnosed as having an autism spectrum disorder. This means more school-aged children are entering classrooms with ASDs and teachers are being called upon to help facilitate their learning. Educating Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders is aimed at providing strategies for teachers, school counselors, and psychologists to help address the needs of children on the spectrum, as well as their families. Erin E. Barton and Beth Harn draw on current research and practices to discuss the possible causes of autism and to help prepare educators not only for teaching children in the classroom but also for providing families with the tools necessary to continue the educational process at home. Included are topics such as: Improving communication and socialization Developing instructive lessons Assessing students' progress Including families in educational goals Finding students' special interests and using those to help facilitate learning Managing challenging behavior And more Including forms, charts, and a range of classroom activities, this is the only resource you will need to gain the insight and tools for making a difference in the educational lives of young children with autism.
Educating Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Partnering with Families for Positive Outcomes focuses on practical strategies for educating children with autism spectrum disorders in the classroom. Additional features describe how to partner with families in the implementation of many of the strategies, giving voice to parents, based on recent quantitative and qualitative research. Case studies developed from real interviews with parents and educators open each chapter, and the book focuses on what “works” and what “does not work” in their collaborative experiences. Key Features Case studies with "What Would You Do" questions offer real life scenarios that allow readers to apply their understanding of the chapter's contents to a situation they may encounter. Theory Into Practice (T.I.P) boxes promote self-reflection and an opportunity to apply material in real-world scenarios. A section of every chapter is devoted to how to collaborate with families to implement the chapter's specific strategies not just at school but also at home. Inclusion tips provide ways to implement the chapter's strategy for teachers in general education classrooms with children with ASD.
Reaching and Teaching Children with Autism provides a positive approach to understanding and educating children on the autism spectrum. The book gives greater insight into the perspective and behavior of a child with autism and explores how the child's learning preferences, strengths and interests can be used to facilitate learning and enhance motivation. Based on well-researched theory and extensive clinical experience, the author provides a comprehensive model for developing lifelong independent learning skills in children with autism between the ages of 3 and 12 years old. The book describes the underlying principles, learning preferences and strengths typical of children with autism and offers a detailed but flexible program structure based on these concepts. Easy to follow activities and approaches are described in each chapter, along with clear examples and illustrations. This accessible and practical book is an essential resource for parents, teachers, support workers, therapists and others concerned with learning and development in children with autism.
What do you do when a three-year-old with autism falls on the floor kicking and screaming? How do you communicate with a child who looks away and flaps his hands? Who can help if you suspect a child in your class has autism? Preschool can be overwhelming for a child with autism. Autism affects how a child communicates, behaves, and relates to others. Teachers need to know what they can do to help children with autism reach their full potential. Teaching Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder is a straightforward, easy-to-understand guide to working with children who have autism. It explains the major characteristics associated with autism and helps teachers understand the ways children with autism relate to the world. Each chapter offers specific strategies for teachers to use, including setting up a proactive preschool environment, helping children learn life skills, managing behavior, helping children with autism communicate, encouraging children with autism to play, helping them to get along with others, and working with families. Teaching Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder helps teachers connect with all children in meaningful ways, allowing children with autism to learn and grow. Putting All the Pieces Together: Understanding This Puzzle Called Autism From Hand-Flapping to Obsession with Routines: The Way Children With Autism Relate to Their World Planning for Success: Setting Up a Proactive Preschool Environment Learning Life Skills Misbehavior or Missed Communication: Managing the Behaviors of Children With Autism Signs, Symbols, and Language: Helping a Child Communicate Inside Their Own World: Encouraging Children With Autism to Play Building Social Skills: Getting Along With Others Lights! Camera! Action! Sensory Integration and Autism We're All in This Together: Teaming Up With Families.
Recent special education legislation has led to a rise in inclusion classrooms, where students with special needs, including autism spectrum disorders, are taught alongside their nondisabled peers. Teaching Children With Autism in the General Classroom provides an introduction to inclusionary practices that serve children with autism, giving teachers the practical advice they need to ensure each student receives the quality education he or she deserves. Promoting field-tested strategies and techniques, this book offers teachers sound advice for creating a classroom environment conducive to learning success for children with autism spectrum disorders. Topics covered include using assistive technology, collaborating with parents and paraeducators, teaching social skills, developing behavioral interventions, and creating effective academic instruction. This book gives general education teachers a solid background of knowledge about autism and the needs of students with the disorder.
In this book parents who have chosen the home education option for their children on the autistic spectrum candidly relate their experiences: how they reached the decision to educate at home, how they set about the task, and their feelings about the issues raised by their actions.
Teaching Children with High-Level Autism combines the perspectives of families and children with disabilities and frames these personal experiences in the context of evidence-based practice, providing pre- and in-service teachers and professionals with vital information on how they can help children with high-level autism reach their full potential. Many children with high-level autism are capable of regulating their behaviors given the right interventions, and this cutting edge text explores multiple methods for helping such children succeed academically, socially, and behaviorally. The book: • draws from interviews with twenty families who have middle- and high-school-aged children with high functioning autism or Aspergers syndrome; • presents a synthesis of the most cutting-edge research in the field; • provides practical advice for educating children with high-level autism; • is authored by two special education professors who are also both the parents of children with disabilities. Teaching Children with High-Level Autism is essential reading for anyone who works or plans to work with children on the upper range of the autism spectrum.
As prevalence rates and awareness of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) increase, there is a need for all educators to have a basic understanding of the disorder and how to teach affected children. Understanding Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Educators Partnering with Families introduces, in an accessible manner, the significant body of research and theory in the field of autism within the larger context of understanding the unique socio-cultural dimensions of individuals with ASD and their families. Engaging and user-friendly, Michelle Haney’s text provides future educators insight into the complexity and diversity of children with ASD, the wide range of interventions and processes for make decisions about choosing interventions (teaming with parents to provide optimal educational opportunities), and the personal/professional growth that is likely to take place during such a journey.
Move from diagnosis to inclusion to education using Educating the Young Child with Autism Spectrum Disorders for all grades. Due to a trend toward inclusion, increased incidence, and increased and broadening diagnosis, many teachers expect to encounter students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Students with ASD can be challenging to teach, especially in a busy, noisy, elementary classroom. ASD causes these students to struggle with communication and socialization, which affects all aspects of their lives. This 64-page book guides teachers through all steps of introducing a student with ASD into the classroom, participating on an IEP team, developing a welcoming classroom, fostering social development and communication, and moving forward with the curriculum. The book also includes a special section for parents.
A collection of essays on teaching autistic children, covering such topics as language use, social-communicative skills, and parenting stress
After more than 17 years of experience working with teachers struggling to implement an effective learning program for special needs kids, Dr. Lori Ernsperger decided it was about time someone created a comprehensive resource for practical use in the classroom. She wrote this book as a practical, step-by-step guide to educating students with autism. This much-needed resource unlocks the secrets of six critical teaching elements, including: creating an effective classroom environment curriculum development instructional strategies managing problem behaviors data collection building collaborative teams Perfect for new and veteran teachers, this book enables school personnel to efficiently create and implement an effective educational program for students with autism regardless of their level of experience or training. Helpful chapters include: Creating a Positive Environment Designing and Implementing an Appropriate Curriculum Identifying & Implementing Instructional Strategies Developing Effective Behavior Programming Data Collection TEAM: Together Everyone Achieves More
What You Can Do Right Now to Help Your Child with Autism gives you the best techniques you can do? right now? to work with your child and draw him or her back into our interactive world.
This new series offers timesaving books on critical topics for educating students with autism spectrum disorders. The four books in this series are filled with practical information and advice, thus making them an ideal resource for classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and graduate students. How can teachers effectively meet the needs of gifted students with autism spectrum disorders in their classrooms? This book explores the array of issues that surround this dual exceptionality. The characteristics and needs of these students are discussed, including issues surrounding sensory integration problems, planning and organization difficulties, social competence, and educational placement decisions.
Children with autism spectrum disorders are increasingly being educated in inclusive general education classrooms. For optimal results, teachers need to know as much as possible about autism and the teaching methods and modifications that work best for these students. This is a huge undertaking for time-crunched general education teachers, many of whom may never have had a student with autism before. Now teachers can turn to "Autism in Your Classroom" for the information and guidance they need. Written by two neuropsychologists with extensive clinical and classroom experience, this new book is a concise, easy-to-read guide developed for primary school teachers. Part I provides a complete overview of the types, causes, characteristics, and treatments of autism spectrum disorders. It also explains various secondary characteristics of autism that create challenges for students, such as sensory abnormalities, behavioural issues, and limited social skills and peer interaction. Part II focuses on the student in the classroom: It covers a variety of strategies to manage learning and behaviour, such as: Modifying classwork and homework; Helping with language difficulties; Using visual strategies; Keeping students focused and organised; Teaching reading and math; Using positive reinforcement and rewards; Handling challenging behaviour; Explaining autism to other students; Teaching social skills in the classroom; Balancing the needs of typical and special students. Part III features two useful case studies. Both stem from the authors' hands-on work and consultation with teachers, students, and parents. The book concludes with an appendix of frequently asked questions about children with autism asked by educators.
Combining their years of experience working with individuals on the autism spectrum, both here and around the world, authors Vera Bernard-Opitz and Anne Häußler bring teachers and other professionals practical ideas and teaching methods for offering visual supports to students with autism spectrum disorders and other visual learners. With hundreds of colorful illustrations and step-by-step directions, this book lays the foundation for how to structure teaching environments, as well as offers countless examples of activities for students, ranging from basic skills, to reading and math, to social behavior.

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