Autism is a word most of us are familiar with. But do we really know what it means? Children with autism are challenged by the most essential human behaviors. They have difficulty interacting with other people-often failing to see people as people rather than simply objects in their environment. They cannot easily communicate ideas and feelings, have great trouble imagining what others think or feel, and in some cases spend their lives speechless. They frequently find it hard to make friends or even bond with family members. Their behavior can seem bizarre. Education is the primary form of treatment for this mysterious condition. This means that we place important responsibilities on schools, teachers and children's parents, as well as the other professionals who work with children with autism. With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1975, we accepted responsibility for educating children who face special challenges like autism. While we have since amassed a substantial body of research, researchers have not adequately communicated with one another, and their findings have not been integrated into a proven curriculum. Educating Children with Autism outlines an interdisciplinary approach to education for children with autism. The committee explores what makes education effective for the child with autism and identifies specific characteristics of programs that work. Recommendations are offered for choosing educational content and strategies, introducing interaction with other children, and other key areas. This book examines some fundamental issues, including: How children's specific diagnoses should affect educational assessment and planning How we can support the families of children with autism Features of effective instructional and comprehensive programs and strategies How we can better prepare teachers, school staffs, professionals, and parents to educate children with autism What policies at the federal, state, and local levels will best ensure appropriate education, examining strategies and resources needed to address the rights of children with autism to appropriate education. Children with autism present educators with one of their most difficult challenges. Through a comprehensive examination of the scientific knowledge underlying educational practices, programs, and strategies, Educating Children with Autism presents valuable information for parents, administrators, advocates, researchers, and policy makers.
A collection of essays on teaching autistic children, covering such topics as language use, social-communicative skills, and parenting stress
This book describes teaching strategies and instructional adaptations which promote communication and socialization in children with autism. It offers specific strategies that capitalize on the individual strengths and learning styles of the autistic child.
This book will guide practitioners, early interventionists, teachers, counselors, and psychologists in identifying and implementing effective strategies that address the unique characteristics of children with autism and their families. The authors describe current research on the etiology of autism and outline a range of effective assessment procedures. Key topics include: - How to guide family participation and supports in developing goals and interventions - Procedures for intervention planning and implementation in natural settings - Methods for promoting generalization and maintenance of skills - Strategies to promote collaboration and problem-solving approaches across multiple disciplines Approaches for evaluating evidence based practices - Ways to foster awareness of recent developments related to evidence-based practices
Of the myriad of approaches to the treatment of autism spectrum disorders, Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) has the most research support. It is not perfect, and its imperfection is highlighted by the inadequate training of many, if not most of its practitioners. Autism is a burgeoning conditionin some locations, it is estimated to affect one in every seventy-five childrenand the numbers of instructor-therapists required to meet their need for treatment is ensuring that many enter the field with inadequate training. Of course, lack of training is not unique to practitioners of ABA; the entire field is struggling to keep up to the demand for services. A related and perhaps as serious a problem is the narrowness of vision that most practitioners bring to the enterprise. ABA has been defined as the process of systematically applying interventions based upon the principles of learning theory to improve socially significant behaviors to a meaningful degree, and to demonstrate that the interventions employed are responsible for the improvement in behavior (Baer, Wolf, and Risley, 1968). Being based on the past hundred years of research into how learning works, ABA has universal applicationit can be applied to any developmental issue. Unfortunately, while any concept can be defined in behavioral terms, you only have to ask yourself, What will I use as an indicator of _______? It tends to get applied primarily to those developmental issues that are easiest to define in behavioral terms. On the other hand, most nonABA approaches have relatively little scientific support. This brief introduction to teaching children with autism is intended to serve as a primer for both instructor-therapists and parents alike. Hopefully, it will also move the field beyond the narrow focus that it has enjoyed for the past few decades.
This book provides a positive approach to understanding and educating children on the autism spectrum. The book gives greater insight into the perspective and behavior of a child with autism and explores how the child's learning preferences, strengths and interests can be used to facilitate learning and enhance motivation.
Based on twenty-five years of teaching and working with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), Christy L. Magnusen contends that it is those teachers who can blend the 'science' of education methodology with the 'art' of teaching who are best able to reach these children. Examining both these aspects of teaching, she takes a fresh look at established and more recent teaching methods such as structuring spaces, emphasizing language and planning strategies for transition and generalization, and then explores the art of implementation: why, when and how these techniques should be applied. By highlighting workable solutions to everyday problems, and emphasizing that teachers need to understand techniques and have the ability to adapt them to the situation that faces them, this book will be invaluable to all those involved in teaching children with ASDs.
The Verbal Behavior (VB) approach is a form of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), that is based on B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior and works particularly well with children with minimal or no speech abilities. In this book Dr. Mary Lynch Barbera draws on her own experiences as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and also as a parent of a child with autism to explain VB and how to use it. This step-by-step guide provides an abundance of information about how to help children develop better language and speaking skills, and also explains how to teach non-vocal children to use sign language. An entire chapter focuses on ways to reduce problem behavior, and there is also useful information on teaching toileting and other important self-help skills, that would benefit any child. This book will enable parents and professionals unfamiliar with the principles of ABA and VB to get started immediately using the Verbal Behavior approach to teach children with autism and related disorders.
The number of children diagnosed with autism has increased dramatically in the last decade, and a growing number of behavior analysts, psychologists, educators, and speech pathologists-to name a few-are just starting to regularly treat individuals with autism. Children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require specialized instruction and behavior support to teach them critical skills and establish a meaningful quality of life. However, these objectives can only be achieved if professional and paraprofessional service providers have access to the most effective evidence-based and empirically supported methods for teaching children with autism. Similarly, practitioners must know about effective intervention methods that can be implemented to reduce and eliminate problem behaviors frequently displayed by people who have ASD. This guide is an indispensible asset, appropriate for any behavioral specialist, on all aspects of this increasingly prevalent disorder. Teaching and Behavior Support for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder brings together contributed chapters on assessment, instruction, and behavioral intervention procedures unique to the autism population. Each chapter covers a single topic according to a uniform format, which will ease comprehension and facilitate procedural adaptation in "real world" settings such as school, home, and the community. Usable advice and methods for teaching difficult skills, such as self-care, verbal language, and communication, are provided. Authored by recognized experts, the concise and readable chapters also feature forms, illustrations, summary tables, and resource lists to further guide practitioners in selecting "best practice" methods. Taking into account specific settings, different age groups, and practitioner experience, this book will serve as a resource for educators, psychologists, and behavior specialists in the field of autism education and treatment, and as an educational tool for those enrolled in university classes training to become practitioners.
Teaching Children with High-Level Autism combines the perspectives of families and children with disabilities and frames these personal experiences in the context of evidence-based practice, providing pre- and in-service teachers and professionals with vital information on how they can help children with high-level autism reach their full potential. Many children with high-level autism are capable of regulating their behaviors given the right interventions, and this cutting edge text explores multiple methods for helping such children succeed academically, socially, and behaviorally. The book: • draws from interviews with twenty families who have middle- and high-school-aged children with high functioning autism or Aspergers syndrome; • presents a synthesis of the most cutting-edge research in the field; • provides practical advice for educating children with high-level autism; • is authored by two special education professors who are also both the parents of children with disabilities. Teaching Children with High-Level Autism is essential reading for anyone who works or plans to work with children on the upper range of the autism spectrum.
Autism is a lifelong condition that requires special care and consideration right into adulthood, and has an impact on many lives. This book is aimed at those concerned with the education and welfare of children with autism; particularly at teachers in Special Education and the psychologists and care professionals who work with teachers and parents of children with autism. Although there is no miracle cure for autism, this book brings a message of hope: that early intervention is advantageous and that, by a better understanding of autism and the different ways it is experienced by individual children, more effective ways can be found to meet educational needs and improve quality of life. Understanding the development processes and problems of children with autism, and the implications of these problems for social and educational learning, is the purpose of this book. The authors provide an accessible account of psychological concepts and research in social and emotional development, communication, cognition and behaviour, as related to individuals with autism. The fundamental problems of autism relationships, communication and flexibility of thought and behaviour are addressed, and practical guidance is offered on how these might be overcome or circumvented, in both home and school. This book specifically addresses the needs of children, but much of it will remain relevant to those working with adults who will appreciate the book s exploration of the roles played by emotion and cognition in the autistic condition, and the way in which these affect teaching and learning.
This workbook expands upon the authors? Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read: A Practical Guide to present the most effective approaches, strategies, and practical guidelines to help alleviate social and communication problems in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Complements the best-selling Teaching Children with Autism to Mind-Read: A Practical Guide for use in practical settings Answers the need for more training of professionals in early interventions for children assessed with ASD called for by the National Plan for Autism Written by a team of experts in the field Covers issues such as how to interpret facial expressions; how to recognize feelings of anger, sadness, fear and happiness; how to perceive how feelings are affected by what happens and what is expected to happen; how to see things from another person?s perspective; and how to understand another person?s knowledge and beliefs
"Classroom Pivotal Response Teaching, or CPRT, was developed to help meet the educational needs of young children with autism. CPRT (originally called Pivotal Response Training or Treatment) is a form of naturalistic behavioral intervention, based on theprinciples of applied behavior analysis (ABA), and is soundly supported in the scientific literature. This manual will describe the components of CPRT and how to implement the approach in your classroom. Although this manual is geared primarily toward preschool through grade 3 teachers, CPRT strategies can be used by a variety of professionals. Speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists, behavior specialists, psychologists and other teaching professionals may all find CPRT a valuable strategy. Additionally, the techniques in this manual may be useful with typically developing children and those with a variety of special needs. Most children can benefit from this structured, systematic approach that utilizes naturally occurring teaching opportunities. One of the strengths of this approach is that it is adaptable to a wide range of teaching goals and service settings. All who teach are encouraged to integrate CPRT into their existing strategies as often as possible"--Provided by publisher.
Similar to a handbook in its comprehensive description of the theory and research supporting current practices in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders, this interdisciplinary text shows how the existing knowledge base can be used to explore promising new possibilities related to the fieldâe(tm)s many unanswered questions. Key features include the following: Comprehensive âe" This is the first book to consider the history and current state of autism as a field in transition, to cover its varied approaches and philosophies, and to describe the interventions used throughout the developmental cycle. Cross Disciplinary âe" Serving students with autism necessitates communication and collaboration among professionals from several disciplines as well as family members. The editors have, therefore, brought together divergent perspectives, theories and philosophies in order to demonstrate that scientific evidence, rather than educational orientation, must determine which practices should be selected for use in particular situations. Research Based âe" Whereas many existing texts advocate a particular type of treatment, this one recognizes that interventions must be selected and evaluated based on the scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Integrated Methodology âe"Chapter authors consider findings from studies that employed single-subject designs, experimental large-scale studies, and qualitative methodology. The inter-relatedness of therapies and disciplines will be highlighted throughout. Expertise âe" The volume editors are all highly visible researchers in autism and developmental disabilities. Likewise, each chapter is directed by a senior, highly accomplished author who is nationally recognized for his/her work in the topic being addressed. This book is appropriate for practicing professionals in education and psychology and for speech/language therapists and other clinicians. It is also suitable as a graduate level text in these fields.
"The author has been voted Teacher of the Year by the Autism Society of America"--The title page.
This book provides an extensive overview of curricula and instructional strategies for teaching children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It offers an empirically solid framework for designing and developing interventions for learners along the autism spectrum by reducing skill deficits and enhancing learner strengths while being flexible enough to allow for individual differences. The book discusses key concepts in educating individuals with ASD as they impact the processes of syllabus building, from planning goals and objectives to generating content choosing appropriate teaching strategies, and assessing progress. Chapters detail curriculum designs in academic areas such as language skills, science, and social studies, as well as functional skills, including independent living, career development, and preventing social victimization. The book concludes with recommendations for future interventions and curricula-building. Among the topics covered: Communication and autism spectrum disorder. Mathematical problem-solving instruction for students with ASD. Visual arts curriculum for students with ASD. How to build programs focused on daily living and adult independence. Sexuality education for students with ASD. Curricula for Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder is a must-have resource for researchers, graduate students, and clinicians and related therapists and professionals in clinical child and school psychology, childhood/special education, social work, developmental psychology, behavioral therapy/rehabilitation, and child and adolescent psychiatry.

Best Books