Through revisiting and challenging what we think we know about the work of Edward Burnett Tylor, a founding figure of anthropology, this volume explores new connections and insights that link Tylor and his work to present concerns in new and important ways. At the publication of Primitive Culture in 1871, Tylor was at the centre of anthropological research on religion and culture, but today Tylor's position in the anthropological canon is rarely acknowledged. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture does not claim to present a definitive, new Tylor. The old Tylor - the founder of British anthropology; the definer of religion; the intellectualist; the evolutionist; the liberal; the utilitarian; the avatar of white, Protestant rationalism; the Tylor of the canon - remains. Part I explore debates and contexts of Tylor's lifetime, while the chapters in Part II explore a series of new Tylors, including Tylor the ethnographer and Tylor the Spiritualist, re-writing the legacy of the founder of anthropology in the process. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture is essential reading for anyone interested in the study of religion and the anthropology of religion.
Through revisiting and challenging what we think we know about the work of Edward Burnett Tylor, a founding figure of anthropology, this volume explores new connections and insights that link Tylor and his work to present concerns in new and important ways. At the publication of Primitive Culture in 1871, Tylor was at the centre of anthropological research on religion and culture, but today Tylor's position in the anthropological canon is rarely acknowledged. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture does not claim to present a definitive, new Tylor. The old Tylor - the founder of British anthropology; the definer of religion; the intellectualist; the evolutionist; the liberal; the utilitarian; the avatar of white, Protestant rationalism; the Tylor of the canon - remains. Part I explore debates and contexts of Tylor's lifetime, while the chapters in Part II explore a series of new Tylors, including Tylor the ethnographer and Tylor the Spiritualist, re-writing the legacy of the founder of anthropology in the process. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture is essential reading for anyone interested in the study of religion and the anthropology of religion.
Through revisiting and challenging what we think we know about the work of Edward Burnett Tylor, a founding figure of anthropology, this volume explores new connections and insights that link Tylor and his work to present concerns in new and important ways. At the publication of Primitive Culture in 1871, Tylor was at the centre of anthropological research on religion and culture, but today Tylor's position in the anthropological canon is rarely acknowledged. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture does not claim to present a definitive, new Tylor. The old Tylor - the founder of British anthropology; the definer of religion; the intellectualist; the evolutionist; the liberal; the utilitarian; the avatar of white, Protestant rationalism; the Tylor of the canon - remains. Part I explore debates and contexts of Tylor's lifetime, while the chapters in Part II explore a series of new Tylors, including Tylor the ethnographer and Tylor the Spiritualist, re-writing the legacy of the founder of anthropology in the process. Edward Burnett Tylor, Religion and Culture is essential reading for anyone interested in the study of religion and the anthropology of religion.
The highly influential classic study of cultural evolution as an anthropological theory, first published in 1871.
Throughout its entire history, the discipline of anthropology has been perceived as undermining, or even discrediting, Christian faith. Many of its most prominent theorists have been agnostics who assumed that ethnographic findings and theories had discredited religious beliefs. Despite being a major site of friction between faith and modern thought, the relationship between anthropology and Christianity has never before been the subject of a book-length study. Inthis groundbreaking work, Timothy Larsen examines the point where doubt and faith collide with anthropological theory and evidence.
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XL ANIMISM. Religious ideas generally appear among low races of Mankind--Negative statements on this subject frequently misleading and mistaken: many cases uncertain--Minimum definition of Religion--Doctrineof Spiritual Beings, here termed Animism--Animism treated asbclongingtoNatural Religion--Animism divided into two sections, the philosophy of Souls, and of other Spirits--Doctrine of Souls, its prevalence and definition among the lower races--Definition of Apparition al Soul or Ghost-Soul--It is a theoretical conception of primitive Philosophy, designed to account for phenomena now classed under Biology, especially Life and Death, Health and Disease, Sleep and Dreams, Trance and Visions--Relation of Soul in name and nature to Shadow, Blood, Breath--Division or Plurality of Souls--Soul cause of Life; its restoration to body when supposed absent--Exit of Soul in Trances--Dreams and Visions: theory of exit of dreamer's or seer's own soul; theory of visits received by them from other souls--Ghost-Soul seen in Apparitions--Wraiths and Doubles--Soul has form of body; suffers mutilation with it--Voice of Ghost--Soul treated and defined as of Material Substance; this appears to be the original doctrine--Transmission of Souls to service in future life by Funeral Sacrifice of wives, attendants, &c.--Souls of Animals--Their transmission by Funeral Sacrifice--Souls of PlantsSouls of Objects--Their transmission by Funeral Sacrifice--Relation of doctrine of Object-Souls to Epicurean theory of Ideas--Historical development of Doctrine of Souls, from the Ethereal Soul of primitive Biology to the Immaterial Soul of modern Theology. Are there, or have there been, tribes of men so low in culture as to have no religious conceptions whatever? This...
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In China, at a time when few girls are taught to read or write, Ruby dreams of going to the university with her brothers and male cousins.
Indigenous religions are the majority of the world's religions. This Companion shows how much they can contribute to a richer understanding of human identity, action, and relationships.An international team of contributors discuss representative indigenous religions from all continents. The book is in three parts--Persons, Powers, and Gifts.Relevant to everyone interested in human religiosity today.
The point of departure for this book is the debate about whether religious studies should privilege explanation or understanding. Engaging with contemporary scholarship in the field, Tremlett argues that the study of religions has always involved the conflation of facts and values and indeed has been structured in advance by the value-saturated discourse on disenchanted modernity. He argues that phenomenological and post-modern approaches to religions lack both theoretical and methodological coherence, and in their stead proposes a Marxist approach to religions that is at once empirical and informed by values pertaining to social justice, freedom and autonomy.
This volume provides a thorough introduction to the major classic and modern writings dealing with religious sacrifice. Collected here are twenty five influential selections, each with a brief introduction addressing the overall framework and assumptions of its author. As they present different theories and examples of sacrifice, these selections also discuss important concepts in religious studies such as the origin of religion, totemism, magic, symbolism, violence, structuralism and ritual performance. Students of comparative religion, ritual studies, the history of religions, the anthropology of religion and theories of religion will particularly value the historical organization and thematic analyses presented in this collection.
A collection of essays analyzing the leading theories of myth. It surveys the contours of this ongoing discussion, comparing and evaluating the theories of Edward Tylor, William Robertson Smith, James Frazer, Jane Harrison, Sigmund Freud, C.G. Jung, and others.
This Is A New Release Of The Original 1913 Edition.

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