How up-to-date is your geographical thought? Are parts of your curriculum becoming tired and out-dated? Effective Innovation in the Secondary Geography Curriculum will help training and practising secondary school teachers understand how to evaluate and refresh their curriculum in order to ensure that what they teach is relevant, topical and creative. Considering the latest developments in both the school geography curriculum and the field of geography as an academic discipline, this exciting new book explores how geography teaching and learning can be developed to engage secondary school pupils and better reflect contemporary society. Illustrated throughout with ideas and practical examples of how to update your curriculum easily and effectively, key topics covered include: Understanding curriculum theory and development; Auditing and developing your own dynamic, interactive curriculum; Critiquing textbooks and resources to ensure relevance; Constructing and analysing schemes of work; Incorporating the latest developments in the field into your teaching; How to create innovative, enduring curricula for human, physical and environmental geographies. Providing insights into the latest thinking in geography in a concise and accessible manner, Effective Innovation in the Secondary Geography Curriculum will ensure motivating, lively and successful geography teaching and learning.
MasterClass in Geography Education provides a comprehensive exploration of the major themes in geography education research and pedagogy, drawing on international research. The editor draws together a variety of professional, academic and practitioner perspectives to support professional development of geography teachers. The book incorporates discussion of the place of subject knowledge in geography, the role and function of research in geography education and the relationship between research and practice. Topics covered include: - research and professional practice - constructing geographical knowledge - ethical considerations - carrying out research projects MasterClass in Geography Education will be essential reading for all studying the teaching and learning of geography on PGCE and Education MEd/MA courses.
Social Studies Today: Research and Practice inspires educators to think freshly and knowingly about social studies education in the early years of the twenty first century. Written by the field’s leading scholars, this collection provokes readers to consider the relationship of research and practice as they think through some of the most interesting challenges that animate social studies education today. Contributors to this volume include luminaries like James Banks, Carole Hahn, Keith Barton, Geneva Gay, Steve Thornton, Linda Levstik, Sam Wineburg, Fred Newmann and more. Each chapter tackles a specific issue and includes discussion of topics such as teaching history, learning tolerance, assessment, globalization, children’s literature, culturally relevant pedagogy, and teaching about genocide. Walter Parker not only pulled these chapters together but also contributes two of his own---both of which are sure to be cited as key works of this era. Accessible, compelling, and full of rich examples and illustrations, this collection showcases some of the most original thinking in the field and offers pre- and in-service teachers alike new ways to improve social studies instruction.
Becoming an Outstanding History Teacher will take the practitioner through the process of improving their practice from start to finish. It offers a wide range of approaches and techniques for teaching and learning that will help to keep students stimulated and engaged when studying history. With history regularly topping public polls of important school subjects and among the most popular subjects to be studied at GCSE, this book considers the components which make an outstanding history teacher and how best to ensure students are motivated and maximise their potential. Focusing on all aspects of teaching history, it provides a step-by-step discussion of the development of lessons and covers a wealth of topics, including: long-, medium-, and short-term planning the classroom environment managing all student abilities dealing with interpretations and sources arranging history fieldwork formative and summative assessment setting meaningful and effective homework. Packed full of tried-and-tested strategies and activities that are easy to implement, this is essential reading for both newly qualified and experienced history teachers who want to ensure outstanding teaching and learning in their classrooms.
Questions about what to teach and how best to teach it are what drive professional practice in the English language classroom. Innovation and change in English language education addresses these key questions so that teachers are able to understand and manage change to organise teaching and learning more effectively. The book provides an accessible introduction to current theory and research in innovation and change in ELT and shows how these understandings have been applied to the practical concerns of the curriculum and the classroom. In specially commissioned chapters written by experts in the field, the volume sets out the key issues in innovation and change and shows how these relate to actual practice offers a guide to innovation and change in key areas grounded in research relates theory to practice through the use of illustrative case studies and examples brings together the very best scholarship in TESOL and language education from around the world This book will be of interest to upper undergraduate and graduate students in applied linguistics, language education and TESOL as well as pre-service and in-service teachers, teacher educators, researchers and administrators keen to create and manage teaching and learning more effectively.
This book reignites discussion on the importance of collaboration and innovation in language education. The pivotal difference highlighted in this volume is the concept of team learning through collaborative relationships such as team teaching. It explores ways in which team learning happens in ELT environments and what emerges from these explorations is a more robust concept of team learning in language education. Coupled with this deeper understanding, the value of participant research is emphasised by defining the notion of ‘team’ to include all participants in the educational experience. Authors in this volume position practice ahead of theory as they struggle to make sense of the complex phenomena of language teaching and learning. The focus of this book is on the nexus between ELT theory and practice as viewed through the lens of collaboration. The volume aims to add to the current knowledge base in order to bridge the theory-practice gap regarding collaboration for innovation in language classrooms.
Now in its 4th edition, this popular text offers practical, interesting, exciting ways to teach social studies and a multitude of instructional and professional resources for teachers. Theory, curriculum, methods, and assessment are woven into a comprehensive model for setting objectives; planning lessons, units, and courses; choosing classroom strategies; and constructing tests for some of the field's most popular and enduring programs. The reflective and integrative framework emphasizes building imagination, insight, and critical thinking into everyday classrooms; encourages problem-solving attitudes and behavior; and provokes analysis, reflection, and debate. The text includes separate chapters on teaching each of the major areas of the social studies curriculum. Throughout the text, all aspects of curriculum and instruction are viewed from a tripartite perspective that divides social studies instruction into didactic (factual), reflective (analytical), and affective (judgmental) components. These three components are seen as supporting one another, building the groundwork for taking stands on issues, past and present. At the center is the author's belief that the heart and soul of social studies instruction, perhaps all teaching, lies in stimulating the production of ideas; looking at knowledge from others' viewpoints; and formulating for oneself a set of goals, values, and beliefs that can be explained and justified in open discussion. New in the Fourth Edition: Clear links to the The National Council for the Social Studies College, Career and Civic Life C3 Framework for Social Studies State Standards Attention to impact of high-stakes testing, Common Core State Standards, and related ongoing developments Expanded and critical review of the use of internet, web, and PowerPoint technologies Coverage of how to incorporate the many social science, humanities, and STEM fields to enrich the social studies Updates and revisions throughout, including new research reports reflecting current findings, new examples, more media and materials resources, particularly digital resources, new and updated pedagogical features Companion Website - new for this edition
First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.
The International Handbook on Geographical Education is the first truly international publication in the field of geographical education for several decades. It is distinctive in the following ways: A large team of highly experienced geographers and educators from around the world have injected their perspectives on international issues in the field. While some reflection of past thinking and practice is evident, the main purpose of this publication is to offer international leadership in geographical education for the world in the twenty first century. Illuminating local and national examples are used to reinforce the international perspectives. The publication challenges geographical educators, policymakers and curriculum developers to reposition themselves for the changing approaches in societies around the world. It is a publication for the thinking geographer and educator who appreciates where international education is travelling to and how its challenges can be met.
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Easy-to-implement classroom lessons from the world’s premier educational system. Finland shocked the world when its fifteen-year-olds scored highest on the first Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a set of tests touted for evaluating critical-thinking skills in math, science, and reading. That was in 2001; but even today, this tiny Nordic nation continues to amaze. How does Finnish education—with short school days, light homework loads, and little standardized testing—produce students who match the PISA scores of high-powered, stressed-out kids in Asia? When Timothy D. Walker started teaching fifth graders at a Helsinki public school, he began a search for the secrets behind the successes of Finland’s schools. Walker wrote about several of those discoveries, and his Atlantic articles on this subject became hot topics of conversation. Here, he gathers all he learned and reveals how any teacher can implement many of Finland's best practices. Remarkably, Finland is prioritizing the joy of learning in its newest core curricula and Walker carefully highlights specific strategies that support joyful K-12 classrooms and integrate seamlessly with educational standards in the United States. From incorporating brain breaks to offering a peaceful learning environment, this book pulls back the curtain on the joyful teaching practices of the world's most lauded school system. His message is simple but profound: these Finland-inspired strategies can be used in the U.S. and other countries. No educator—or parent of a school-aged child—will want to miss out on the message of joy and change conveyed in this book.
Knowing About Language is an essential and comprehensive introduction to and discussion of the value of linguistics in the secondary and post 16 curriculum. Split into three easily accessible parts, each chapter draws on theoretical and practical reasons for developing language awareness for the teacher and student, the impact of government and institutional policy on teaching and teacher knowledge, and explores recent research about the value of linguistic knowledge to support student attainment. Expert contributors show how recent innovations in linguistics can support language teaching by providing a range of practical ideas that can be used in the classroom. Knowing About Language is a valuable theoretical, critical and practical guide for the teacher and researcher, and anyone interested in applied linguistics and the study of language in education.Written by authors who are passionate about the value of language study both as a classroom topic and more generally, this book acts as a resource to inform and support teachers in wider aspects of their role by demonstrating the powerfully enabling nature and inherent value of language study and linguistics in secondary and post-16 curricula.
This volume focuses on an inclusive pedagogical approach for enhancing teaching and learning in key areas of curriculum including: literacy, mathematics, science, social studies, and the arts.
What is the role of the humanities in the modern school? Should geography, history, RE and Citizenship teachers remain faithful to long-standing subject cultures and pedagogies? Or is there another way to consider how the curriculum, and the notion of individual subjects and teachers’ pedagogy, could be constructed? Drawing on case studies taken from a range of innovative secondary schools, and interrogating the use of cross-curricular approaches in UK schools, Cross-Curricular Teaching and Learning in Humanities constructs a research based pedagogy with practical steps for students and teachers as they consider how cross-curricular approaches can be implemented in their own subject areas. Key features include: Clear theoretical frameworks for cross-curricular processes of teaching and learning in the humanities Lively and engaging text that blends key issues with stories of current practice An analysis of the use of assessment, enquiry, and pupil talk as key components in building a cross-curricular approach to the humanities Practical and reflective tasks that enable to reader to apply their reading to day to day practice, alongside links to professional standards Summaries of key research linked to suggestions for further reading Professional development activities to promote cross-curricular dialogue Part of the Cross-Curricular Teaching and Learning in the Secondary School series, this timely interdisciplinary textbook is essential reading for all students on Initial Teacher Training courses and practising teachers looking to holistically introduce cross-curricular themes and practices in secondary Humanities teaching.
An increasing amount of work in many aspects of human geography is concerned with the effects caused by different types of institutions. Included in this book, originally published in 1982, is material from Britain, Ameican and Europe and it is shown that differences in institutional powers in these places, especially those vested in the State, relate directly to their own particular urban and environmental policies and problems. Each chapter, written by an expert on this subject, considers key institutions in a number of fields and draws conclusions about how this ‘institutionalist’ approach can be used by geographers.
Effective science teaching requires creativity, imagination, and innovation. In light of concerns about American science literacy, scientists and educators have struggled to teach this discipline more effectively. Science Teaching Reconsidered provides undergraduate science educators with a path to understanding students, accommodating their individual differences, and helping them grasp the methods--and the wonder--of science. What impact does teaching style have? How do I plan a course curriculum? How do I make lectures, classes, and laboratories more effective? How can I tell what students are thinking? Why don't they understand? This handbook provides productive approaches to these and other questions. Written by scientists who are also educators, the handbook offers suggestions for having a greater impact in the classroom and provides resources for further research.

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