This book describes the spectral theory of finite graphs.
A modern, comprehensive 2010 overview providing an easy introduction for applied scientists who are not versed in mathematics.
This volume, the third in a sequence that began with The Theory of Matroids and Combinatorial Geometries, concentrates on the applications of matroid theory to a variety of topics from engineering (rigidity and scene analysis), combinatorics (graphs, lattices, codes and designs), topology and operations research (the greedy algorithm).
The purpose of this book, which was first published in 1978, is to give a complete account of the theory of permanents, their history and applications. This volume was the first complete account of the theory of permanents, covering virtually the whole of the subject, a feature that no simple survey of the theory of matrices can even attempt. The work also contains many results stated without formal proofs. This book can be used as a textbook at the advanced undergraduate or graduate level. The only prerequisites are a standard undergraduate course in the theory of matrices and a measure of mathematical maturity.
Graphs and matrices enjoy a fascinating and mutually beneficial relationship. This interplay has benefited both graph theory and linear algebra. In one direction, knowledge about one of the graphs that can be associated with a matrix can be used to illuminate matrix properties and to get better information about the matrix. Examples include the use of digraphs to obtain strong results on diagonal dominance and eigenvalue inclusion regions and the use of the Rado-Hall theorem to deduce properties of special classes of matrices. Going the other way, linear algebraic properties of one of the matrices associated with a graph can be used to obtain useful combinatorial information about the graph. The adjacency matrix and the Laplacian matrix are two well-known matrices associated to a graph, and their eigenvalues encode important information about the graph. Another important linear algebraic invariant associated with a graph is the Colin de Verdiere number, which, for instance, characterizes certain topological properties of the graph. This book is not a comprehensive study of graphs and matrices. The particular content of the lectures was chosen for its accessibility, beauty, and current relevance, and for the possibility of enticing the audience to want to learn more.
The arrangement of nonzero entries of a matrix, described by the graph of the matrix, limits the possible geometric multiplicities of the eigenvalues, which are far more limited by this information than algebraic multiplicities or the numerical values of the eigenvalues. This book gives a unified development of how the graph of a symmetric matrix influences the possible multiplicities of its eigenvalues. While the theory is richest in cases where the graph is a tree, work on eigenvalues, multiplicities and graphs has provided the opportunity to identify which ideas have analogs for non-trees, and those for which trees are essential. It gathers and organizes the fundamental ideas to allow students and researchers to easily access and investigate the many interesting questions in the subject.
There is no other book with such a wide scope of both areas of algebraic graph theory.
Model theory is concerned with the notions of definition, interpretation and structure in a very general setting, and is applied to a wide range of other areas such as set theory, geometry, algebra and computer science. This book provides an integrated introduction to model theory for graduate students.
This book contains the notes of the lectures delivered at an Advanced Course on Combinatorial Matrix Theory held at Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona. These notes correspond to five series of lectures. The first series is dedicated to the study of several matrix classes defined combinatorially, and was delivered by Richard A. Brualdi. The second one, given by Pauline van den Driessche, is concerned with the study of spectral properties of matrices with a given sign pattern. Dragan Stevanović delivered the third one, devoted to describing the spectral radius of a graph as a tool to provide bounds of parameters related with properties of a graph. The fourth lecture was delivered by Stephen Kirkland and is dedicated to the applications of the Group Inverse of the Laplacian matrix. The last one, given by Ángeles Carmona, focuses on boundary value problems on finite networks with special in-depth on the M-matrix inverse problem.
Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the book delves deeper into the properties of the principal eigenvector; a critical subject as many of the results on the spectral radius of graphs rely on the properties of the principal eigenvector for their proofs. A following chapter surveys spectral radius of special graphs, covering multipartite graphs, non-regular graphs, planar graphs, threshold graphs, and others. Finally, the work explores results on the structure of graphs having extreme spectral radius in classes of graphs defined by fixing the value of a particular, integer-valued graph invariant, such as: the diameter, the radius, the domination number, the matching number, the clique number, the independence number, the chromatic number or the sequence of vertex degrees. Throughout, the text includes the valuable addition of proofs to accompany the majority of presented results. This enables the reader to learn tricks of the trade and easily see if some of the techniques apply to a current research problem, without having to spend time on searching for the original articles. The book also contains a handful of open problems on the topic that might provide initiative for the reader's research. Dedicated coverage to one of the most prominent graph eigenvalues Proofs and open problems included for further study Overview of classical topics such as spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem
This book provides an integrated treatment of the theory of nonnegative matrices (matrices with only positive numbers or zero as entries) and some related classes of positive matrices, concentrating on connections with game theory, combinatorics, inequalities, optimisation and mathematical economics. The wide variety of applications, which include price fixing, scheduling and the fair division problem, have been carefully chosen both for their elegant mathematical content and for their accessibility to students with minimal preparation. Many results in matrix theory are also presented. The treatment is rigorous and almost all results are proved completely. These results and applications will be of great interest to researchers in linear programming, statistics and operations research. The minimal prerequisites also make the book accessible to first-year graduate students.
Graph Theory and Its Applications, Third Edition is the latest edition of the international, bestselling textbook for undergraduate courses in graph theory, yet it is expansive enough to be used for graduate courses as well. The textbook takes a comprehensive, accessible approach to graph theory, integrating careful exposition of classical developments with emerging methods, models, and practical needs. The authors’ unparalleled treatment is an ideal text for a two-semester course and a variety of one-semester classes, from an introductory one-semester course to courses slanted toward classical graph theory, operations research, data structures and algorithms, or algebra and topology. Features of the Third Edition Expanded coverage on several topics (e.g., applications of graph coloring and tree-decompositions) Provides better coverage of algorithms and algebraic and topological graph theory than any other text Incorporates several levels of carefully designed exercises that promote student retention and develop and sharpen problem-solving skills Includes supplementary exercises to develop problem-solving skills, solutions and hints, and a detailed appendix, which reviews the textbook’s topics About the Authors Jonathan L. Gross is a professor of computer science at Columbia University. His research interests include topology and graph theory. Jay Yellen is a professor of mathematics at Rollins College. His current areas of research include graph theory, combinatorics, and algorithms. Mark Anderson is also a mathematics professor at Rollins College. His research interest in graph theory centers on the topological or algebraic side.
This excellent 1981 treatment of the mathematical theory of entropy gives an accessible exposition its application to other fields.
A thorough mathematical analysis of controllability problems with a detailed investigation of methods for solving them numerically.
Encyclopedia of Mathematics is a comprehensive one-volume encyclopedia designed for high school through early college students. More than 1,000 entries, numerous essays, and more than 125 photographs and illustrations cover the principal areas and issues that characterize this "new" area of science. This valuable resource unites disparate ideas and provides the meaning, history, context, and relevance behind each one. The easy-to-use format makes finding straightforward and natural answers to questions within arithmetic simple. Encyclopedia of Mathematics also gives historical context to mathematical concepts, with entries discussing ancient Arabic, Babylonian, Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Hindu, and Mayan mathematics, as well as entries providing biographical descriptions of important people in the development of mathematics.

Best Books