The main theme of the book is the study, from the standpoint of s-numbers, of integral operators of Hardy type and related Sobolev embeddings. In the theory of s-numbers the idea is to attach to every bounded linear map between Banach spaces a monotone decreasing sequence of non-negative numbers with a view to the classification of operators according to the way in which these numbers approach a limit: approximation numbers provide an especially important example of such numbers. The asymptotic behavior of the s-numbers of Hardy operators acting between Lebesgue spaces is determined here in a wide variety of cases. The proof methods involve the geometry of Banach spaces and generalized trigonometric functions; there are connections with the theory of the p-Laplacian.
This is a collection of contributed papers which focus on recent results in areas of differential equations, function spaces, operator theory and interpolation theory. In particular, it covers current work on measures of non-compactness and real interpolation, sharp Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequalites, the HELP inequality, error estimates and spectral theory of elliptic operators, pseudo differential operators with discontinuous symbols, variable exponent spaces and entropy numbers. These papers contribute to areas of analysis which have been and continue to be heavily influenced by the leading British analysts David Edmunds and Des Evans. This book marks their respective 80th and 70th birthdays.
This second edition provides a broad range of methods and concepts required for the analysis and solution of equations which arise in the modeling of phenomena in the natural, engineering, and applied mathematical sciences. It may be used productively by both undergraduate and graduate students, as well as others who wish to learn, understand, and apply these techniques. Detailed discussions are also given for several topics that are not usually included in standard textbooks at this level of presentation: qualitative methods for differential equations, dimensionalization and scaling, elements of asymptotics, difference equations and several perturbation procedures. Further, this second edition includes several new topics covering functional equations, the Lambert–W function, nonstandard sets of periodic functions, and the method of dominant balance. Each chapter contains a large number of worked examples and provides references to the appropriate books and literature. Request Inspection Copy
The book deals with the representation in series form of compact linear operators acting between Banach spaces, and provides an analogue of the classical Hilbert space results of this nature that have their roots in the work of D. Hilbert, F. Riesz and E. Schmidt. The representation involves a recursively obtained sequence of points on the unit sphere of the initial space and a corresponding sequence of positive numbers that correspond to the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the map in the Hilbert space case. The lack of orthogonality is partially compensated by the systematic use of polar sets. There are applications to the p-Laplacian and similar nonlinear partial differential equations. Preliminary material is presented in the first chapter, the main results being established in Chapter 2. The final chapter is devoted to the problems encountered when trying to represent non-compact maps.
The goal of the book is to present, in a complete and comprehensive way, areas of current research interlacing around the Poncelet porism: dynamics of integrable billiards, algebraic geometry of hyperelliptic Jacobians, and classical projective geometry of pencils of quadrics. The most important results and ideas, classical as well as modern, connected to the Poncelet theorem are presented, together with a historical overview analyzing the classical ideas and their natural generalizations. Special attention is paid to the realization of the Griffiths and Harris programme about Poncelet-type problems and addition theorems. This programme, formulated three decades ago, is aimed to understanding the higher-dimensional analogues of Poncelet problems and the realization of the synthetic approach of higher genus addition theorems.
The book presents a systematic and compact treatment of the qualitative theory of half-linear differential equations. It contains the most updated and comprehensive material and represents the first attempt to present the results of the rapidly developing theory of half-linear differential equations in a unified form. The main topics covered by the book are oscillation and asymptotic theory and the theory of boundary value problems associated with half-linear equations, but the book also contains a treatment of related topics like PDE’s with p-Laplacian, half-linear difference equations and various more general nonlinear differential equations. - The first complete treatment of the qualitative theory of half-linear differential equations. - Comparison of linear and half-linear theory. - Systematic approach to half-linear oscillation and asymptotic theory. - Comprehensive bibliography and index. - Useful as a reference book in the topic.
Marek Kuczma was born in 1935 in Katowice, Poland, and died there in 1991. After finishing high school in his home town, he studied at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He defended his doctoral dissertation under the supervision of Stanislaw Golab. In the year of his habilitation, in 1963, he obtained a position at the Katowice branch of the Jagiellonian University (now University of Silesia, Katowice), and worked there till his death. Besides his several administrative positions and his outstanding teaching activity, he accomplished excellent and rich scientific work publishing three monographs and 180 scientific papers. He is considered to be the founder of the celebrated Polish school of functional equations and inequalities. "The second half of the title of this book describes its contents adequately. Probably even the most devoted specialist would not have thought that about 300 pages can be written just about the Cauchy equation (and on some closely related equations and inequalities). And the book is by no means chatty, and does not even claim completeness. Part I lists the required preliminary knowledge in set and measure theory, topology and algebra. Part II gives details on solutions of the Cauchy equation and of the Jensen inequality [...], in particular on continuous convex functions, Hamel bases, on inequalities following from the Jensen inequality [...]. Part III deals with related equations and inequalities (in particular, Pexider, Hosszú, and conditional equations, derivations, convex functions of higher order, subadditive functions and stability theorems). It concludes with an excursion into the field of extensions of homomorphisms in general." (Janos Aczel, Mathematical Reviews) "This book is a real holiday for all the mathematicians independently of their strict speciality. One can imagine what deliciousness represents this book for functional equationists." (B. Crstici, Zentralblatt für Mathematik)
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications explores the variety of techniques commonly used to analyze and interpret images. It also describes challenging real-world applications where vision is being successfully used, both for specialized applications such as medical imaging, and for fun, consumer-level tasks such as image editing and stitching, which students can apply to their own personal photos and videos. More than just a source of “recipes,” this exceptionally authoritative and comprehensive textbook/reference also takes a scientific approach to basic vision problems, formulating physical models of the imaging process before inverting them to produce descriptions of a scene. These problems are also analyzed using statistical models and solved using rigorous engineering techniques. Topics and features: structured to support active curricula and project-oriented courses, with tips in the Introduction for using the book in a variety of customized courses; presents exercises at the end of each chapter with a heavy emphasis on testing algorithms and containing numerous suggestions for small mid-term projects; provides additional material and more detailed mathematical topics in the Appendices, which cover linear algebra, numerical techniques, and Bayesian estimation theory; suggests additional reading at the end of each chapter, including the latest research in each sub-field, in addition to a full Bibliography at the end of the book; supplies supplementary course material for students at the associated website, http://szeliski.org/Book/. Suitable for an upper-level undergraduate or graduate-level course in computer science or engineering, this textbook focuses on basic techniques that work under real-world conditions and encourages students to push their creative boundaries. Its design and exposition also make it eminently suitable as a unique reference to the fundamental techniques and current research literature in computer vision.
This book, in honor of Hari M. Srivastava, discusses essential developments in mathematical research in a variety of problems. It contains thirty-five articles, written by eminent scientists from the international mathematical community, including both research and survey works. Subjects covered include analytic number theory, combinatorics, special sequences of numbers and polynomials, analytic inequalities and applications, approximation of functions and quadratures, orthogonality and special and complex functions. The mathematical results and open problems discussed in this book are presented in a simple and self-contained manner. The book contains an overview of old and new results, methods, and theories toward the solution of longstanding problems in a wide scientific field, as well as new results in rapidly progressing areas of research. The book will be useful for researchers and graduate students in the fields of mathematics, physics and other computational and applied sciences.
In this book, fundamental methods of nonlinear analysis are introduced, discussed and illustrated in straightforward examples. Each method considered is motivated and explained in its general form, but presented in an abstract framework as comprehensively as possible. A large number of methods are applied to boundary value problems for both ordinary and partial differential equations. In this edition we have made minor revisions, added new material and organized the content slightly differently. In particular, we included evolutionary equations and differential equations on manifolds. The applications to partial differential equations follow every abstract framework of the method in question. The text is structured in two levels: a self-contained basic level and an advanced level - organized in appendices - for the more experienced reader. The last chapter contains more involved material and can be skipped by those new to the field. This book serves as both a textbook for graduate-level courses and a reference book for mathematicians, engineers and applied scientists
This text takes advantage of recent developments in the theory of path integration and attempts to make a major paradigm shift in how the art of functional integration is practiced. The techniques developed in the work will prove valuable to graduate students and researchers in physics, chemistry, mathematical physics, and applied mathematics who find it necessary to deal with solutions to wave equations, both quantum and beyond. A Modern Approach to Functional Integration offers insight into a number of contemporary research topics, which may lead to improved methods and results that cannot be found elsewhere in the textbook literature. Exercises are included in most chapters, making the book suitable for a one-semester graduate course on functional integration.
Generalized Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions highlights, to those in the area of generalized trigonometric functions, an alternative path to the creation and analysis of these classes of functions. Previous efforts have started with integral representations for the inverse generalized sine functions, followed by the construction of the associated cosine functions, and from this, various properties of the generalized trigonometric functions are derived. However, the results contained in this book are based on the application of both geometrical phase space and dynamical systems methodologies. Features Clear, direct construction of a new set of generalized trigonometric and hyperbolic functions Presentation of why x2+y2 = 1, and related expressions, may be interpreted in three distinct ways All the constructions, proofs, and derivations can be readily followed and understood by students, researchers, and professionals in the natural and mathematical sciences
This book develops a theory of formal power series in noncommuting variables, the main emphasis being on results applicable to automata and formal language theory. This theory was initiated around 196O-apart from some scattered work done earlier in connection with free groups-by M. P. Schutzenberger to whom also belong some of the main results. So far there is no book in existence concerning this theory. This lack has had the unfortunate effect that formal power series have not been known and used by theoretical computer scientists to the extent they in our estimation should have been. As with most mathematical formalisms, the formalism of power series is capable of unifying and generalizing known results. However, it is also capable of establishing specific results which are difficult if not impossible to establish by other means. This is a point we hope to be able to make in this book. That formal power series constitute a powerful tool in automata and language theory depends on the fact that they in a sense lead to the arithmetization of automata and language theory. We invite the reader to prove, for instance, Theorem IV. 5. 3 or Corollaries III. 7. 8 and III. 7.- all specific results in language theory-by some other means. Although this book is mostly self-contained, the reader is assumed to have some background in algebra and analysis, as well as in automata and formal language theory.
The aim of this book is to present the fundamental concepts and properties of the geodesic flow of a closed Riemannian manifold. The topics covered are close to my research interests. An important goal here is to describe properties of the geodesic flow which do not require curvature assumptions. A typical example of such a property and a central result in this work is Mane's formula that relates the topological entropy of the geodesic flow with the exponential growth rate of the average numbers of geodesic arcs between two points in the manifold. The material here can be reasonably covered in a one-semester course. I have in mind an audience with prior exposure to the fundamentals of Riemannian geometry and dynamical systems. I am very grateful for the assistance and criticism of several people in preparing the text. In particular, I wish to thank Leonardo Macarini and Nelson Moller who helped me with the writing of the first two chapters and the figures. Gonzalo Tomaria caught several errors and contributed with helpful suggestions. Pablo Spallanzani wrote solutions to several of the exercises. I have used his solutions to write many of the hints and answers. I also wish to thank the referee for a very careful reading of the manuscript and for a large number of comments with corrections and suggestions for improvement.
Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in computer science. Based on feedback from extensive classroom experience, the book has been carefully structured in order to make teaching more natural and effective. Slides and additional exercises (with solutions for lecturers) are also available through the book's supporting website to help course instructors prepare their lectures.
In many areas of mathematics, science and engineering, from computer graphics to inverse methods to signal processing, it is necessary to estimate parameters, usually multidimensional, by approximation and interpolation. Radial basis functions are a powerful tool which work well in very general circumstances and so are becoming of widespread use as the limitations of other methods, such as least squares, polynomial interpolation or wavelet-based, become apparent. The author's aim is to give a thorough treatment from both the theoretical and practical implementation viewpoints. For example, he emphasises the many positive features of radial basis functions such as the unique solvability of the interpolation problem, the computation of interpolants, their smoothness and convergence and provides a careful classification of the radial basis functions into types that have different convergence. A comprehensive bibliography rounds off what will prove a very valuable work.
This book is based on the notes of the authors' seminar on algebraic and Lie groups held at the Department of Mechanics and Mathematics of Moscow University in 1967/68. Our guiding idea was to present in the most economic way the theory of semisimple Lie groups on the basis of the theory of algebraic groups. Our main sources were A. Borel's paper [34], C. ChevalIey's seminar [14], seminar "Sophus Lie" [15] and monographs by C. Chevalley [4], N. Jacobson [9] and J-P. Serre [16, 17]. In preparing this book we have completely rearranged these notes and added two new chapters: "Lie groups" and "Real semisimple Lie groups". Several traditional topics of Lie algebra theory, however, are left entirely disregarded, e.g. universal enveloping algebras, characters of linear representations and (co)homology of Lie algebras. A distinctive feature of this book is that almost all the material is presented as a sequence of problems, as it had been in the first draft of the seminar's notes. We believe that solving these problems may help the reader to feel the seminar's atmosphere and master the theory. Nevertheless, all the non-trivial ideas, and sometimes solutions, are contained in hints given at the end of each section. The proofs of certain theorems, which we consider more difficult, are given directly in the main text. The book also contains exercises, the majority of which are an essential complement to the main contents.
This book introduces a new outlook on thermodynamics. It brings the theory up to the present time and indicates areas of further development with the union of information theory and the theory of means and their inequalities.

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