Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces suitable for a first course on the subject. Prerequisites are kept to an absolute minimum – nothing beyond first courses in linear algebra and multivariable calculus – and the most direct and straightforward approach is used throughout. New features of this revised and expanded second edition include: a chapter on non-Euclidean geometry, a subject that is of great importance in the history of mathematics and crucial in many modern developments. The main results can be reached easily and quickly by making use of the results and techniques developed earlier in the book. Coverage of topics such as: parallel transport and its applications; map colouring; holonomy and Gaussian curvature. Around 200 additional exercises, and a full solutions manual for instructors, available via www.springer.com ul>
Curves and surfaces are objects that everyone can see, and many of the questions that can be asked about them are natural and easily understood. Differential geometry is concerned with the precise mathematical formulation of some of these questions, and with trying to answer them using calculus techniques. It is a subject that contains some of the most beautiful and profound results in mathematics yet many of these are accessible to higher-level undergraduates. Elementary Differential Geometrypresents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces while keeping the prerequisites to an absolute minimum. Nothing more than first courses in linear algebra and multivariate calculus are required, and the most direct and straightforward approach is used at all times. Numerous diagrams illustrate both the ideas in the text and the examples of curves and surfaces discussed there. The book will provide an invaluable resource to all those taking a first course in differential geometry, for their lecturers, and for all others interested in the subject. Andrew Pressley is Professor of Mathematics at Kings College London, UK. The Springer Undergraduate Mathematics Series (SUMS) is a series designed for undergraduates in mathematics and the sciences worldwide. From core foundational material to final year topics, SUMS books take a fresh and modern approach and are ideal for self-study or for a one- or two-semester course. Each book includes numerous examples, problems and fully worked solutions.
Elementary Differential Geometry presents the main results in the differential geometry of curves and surfaces suitable for a first course on the subject. Prerequisites are kept to an absolute minimum – nothing beyond first courses in linear algebra and multivariable calculus – and the most direct and straightforward approach is used throughout. New features of this revised and expanded second edition include: a chapter on non-Euclidean geometry, a subject that is of great importance in the history of mathematics and crucial in many modern developments. The main results can be reached easily and quickly by making use of the results and techniques developed earlier in the book. Coverage of topics such as: parallel transport and its applications; map colouring; holonomy and Gaussian curvature. Around 200 additional exercises, and a full solutions manual for instructors, available via www.springer.com
Differential geometry arguably offers the smoothest transition from the standard university mathematics sequence of the first four semesters in calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations to the higher levels of abstraction and proof encountered at the upper division by mathematics majors. Today it is possible to describe differential geometry as "the study of structures on the tangent space," and this text develops this point of view. This book, unlike other introductory texts in differential geometry, develops the architecture necessary to introduce symplectic and contact geometry alongside its Riemannian cousin. The main goal of this book is to bring the undergraduate student who already has a solid foundation in the standard mathematics curriculum into contact with the beauty of higher mathematics. In particular, the presentation here emphasizes the consequences of a definition and the careful use of examples and constructions in order to explore those consequences.
In the past decade there has been a significant change in the freshman/ sophomore mathematics curriculum as taught at many, if not most, of our colleges. This has been brought about by the introduction of linear algebra into the curriculum at the sophomore level. The advantages of using linear algebra both in the teaching of differential equations and in the teaching of multivariate calculus are by now widely recognized. Several textbooks adopting this point of view are now available and have been widely adopted. Students completing the sophomore year now have a fair preliminary under standing of spaces of many dimensions. It should be apparent that courses on the junior level should draw upon and reinforce the concepts and skills learned during the previous year. Unfortunately, in differential geometry at least, this is usually not the case. Textbooks directed to students at this level generally restrict attention to 2-dimensional surfaces in 3-space rather than to surfaces of arbitrary dimension. Although most of the recent books do use linear algebra, it is only the algebra of ~3. The student's preliminary understanding of higher dimensions is not cultivated.
This carefully written book is an introduction to the beautiful ideas and results of differential geometry. The first half covers the geometry of curves and surfaces, which provide much of the motivation and intuition for the general theory. The second part studies the geometry of general manifolds, with particular emphasis on connections and curvature. The text is illustrated with many figures and examples. The prerequisites are undergraduate analysis and linear algebra. This new edition provides many advancements, including more figures and exercises, and--as a new feature--a good number of solutions to selected exercises.
Differential geometry has a long, wonderful history it has found relevance in areas ranging from machinery design of the classification of four-manifolds to the creation of theories of nature's fundamental forces to the study of DNA. This book studies the differential geometry of surfaces with the goal of helping students make the transition from the compartmentalized courses in a standard university curriculum to a type of mathematics that is a unified whole, it mixes geometry, calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, complex variables, the calculus of variations, and notions from the sciences. Differential geometry is not just for mathematics majors, it is also for students in engineering and the sciences. Into the mix of these ideas comes the opportunity to visualize concepts through the use of computer algebra systems such as Maple. The book emphasizes that this visualization goes hand-in-hand with the understanding of the mathematics behind the computer construction. Students will not only “see” geodesics on surfaces, but they will also see the effect that an abstract result such as the Clairaut relation can have on geodesics. Furthermore, the book shows how the equations of motion of particles constrained to surfaces are actually types of geodesics. Students will also see how particles move under constraints. The book is rich in results and exercises that form a continuous spectrum, from those that depend on calculation to proofs that are quite abstract.
One of the most widely used texts in its field, this volume introduces the differential geometry of curves and surfaces in both local and global aspects. The presentation departs from the traditional approach with its more extensive use of elementary linear algebra and its emphasis on basic geometrical facts rather than machinery or random details. Many examples and exercises enhance the clear, well-written exposition, along with hints and answers to some of the problems. The treatment begins with a chapter on curves, followed by explorations of regular surfaces, the geometry of the Gauss map, the intrinsic geometry of surfaces, and global differential geometry. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of mathematics, this text's prerequisites include an undergraduate course in linear algebra and some familiarity with the calculus of several variables. For this second edition, the author has corrected, revised, and updated the entire volume.
A thoroughly revised second edition of a textbook for a first course in differential/modern geometry that introduces methods within a historical context.
Providing an introduction to the ideas and methods of linear functional analysis, this book shows how familiar and useful concepts from finite-dimensional linear algebra can be extended or generalized to infinite-dimensional spaces. In the initial chapters, the theory of infinite-dimensional normed spaces (in particular Hilbert spaces) is developed, while in later chapters the emphasis shifts to studying operators between such spaces. Functional analysis has applications to a vast range of areas of mathematics; the final chapter discusses the two particularly important areas of integral and differential equations. The reader is assumed to have a standard undergraduate knowledge of linear algebra, real analysis (including the theory of metric spaces), and Lebesgue integration. An introductory chapter summarizes the requisite material. Many exercises are included with solutions provided for each.
Cartan geometries were the first examples of connections on a principal bundle. They seem to be almost unknown these days, in spite of the great beauty and conceptual power they confer on geometry. The aim of the present book is to fill the gap in the literature on differential geometry by the missing notion of Cartan connections. Although the author had in mind a book accessible to graduate students, potential readers would also include working differential geometers who would like to know more about what Cartan did, which was to give a notion of "espaces giniralisis" (= Cartan geometries) generalizing homogeneous spaces (= Klein geometries) in the same way that Riemannian geometry generalizes Euclidean geometry. In addition, physicists will be interested to see the fully satisfying way in which their gauge theory can be truly regarded as geometry.
The geometry of surfaces is an ideal starting point for learning geometry, for, among other reasons, the theory of surfaces of constant curvature has maximal connectivity with the rest of mathematics. This text provides the student with the knowledge of a geometry of greater scope than the classical geometry taught today, which is no longer an adequate basis for mathematics or physics, both of which are becoming increasingly geometric. It includes exercises and informal discussions.
This English edition could serve as a text for a first year graduate course on differential geometry, as did for a long time the Chicago Notes of Chern mentioned in the Preface to the German Edition. Suitable references for ordin ary differential equations are Hurewicz, W. Lectures on ordinary differential equations. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1958, and for the topology of surfaces: Massey, Algebraic Topology, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1977. Upon David Hoffman fell the difficult task of transforming the tightly constructed German text into one which would mesh well with the more relaxed format of the Graduate Texts in Mathematics series. There are some e1aborations and several new figures have been added. I trust that the merits of the German edition have survived whereas at the same time the efforts of David helped to elucidate the general conception of the Course where we tried to put Geometry before Formalism without giving up mathematical rigour. 1 wish to thank David for his work and his enthusiasm during the whole period of our collaboration. At the same time I would like to commend the editors of Springer-Verlag for their patience and good advice. Bonn Wilhelm Klingenberg June,1977 vii From the Preface to the German Edition This book has its origins in a one-semester course in differential geometry which 1 have given many times at Gottingen, Mainz, and Bonn.
Accessible, concise, and self-contained, this book offers an outstanding introduction to three related subjects: differential geometry, differential topology, and dynamical systems. Topics of special interest addressed in the book include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Morse Theory, and the geodesic flow. Smooth manifolds, Riemannian metrics, affine connections, the curvature tensor, differential forms, and integration on manifolds provide the foundation for many applications in dynamical systems and mechanics. The authors also discuss the Gauss-Bonnet theorem and its implications in non-Euclidean geometry models. The differential topology aspect of the book centers on classical, transversality theory, Sard's theorem, intersection theory, and fixed-point theorems. The construction of the de Rham cohomology builds further arguments for the strong connection between the differential structure and the topological structure. It also furnishes some of the tools necessary for a complete understanding of the Morse theory. These discussions are followed by an introduction to the theory of hyperbolic systems, with emphasis on the quintessential role of the geodesic flow. The integration of geometric theory, topological theory, and concrete applications to dynamical systems set this book apart. With clean, clear prose and effective examples, the authors' intuitive approach creates a treatment that is comprehensible to relative beginners, yet rigorous enough for those with more background and experience in the field.
Thoroughly updated, featuring new material on important topics such as hyperbolic geometry in higher dimensions and generalizations of hyperbolicity Includes full solutions for all exercises Successful first edition sold over 800 copies in North America
This is a textbook on differential geometry well-suited to a variety of courses on this topic. For readers seeking an elementary text, the prerequisites are minimal and include plenty of examples and intermediate steps within proofs, while providing an invitation to more excursive applications and advanced topics. For readers bound for graduate school in math or physics, this is a clear, concise, rigorous development of the topic including the deep global theorems. For the benefit of all readers, the author employs various techniques to render the difficult abstract ideas herein more understandable and engaging. Over 300 color illustrations bring the mathematics to life, instantly clarifying concepts in ways that grayscale could not. Green-boxed definitions and purple-boxed theorems help to visually organize the mathematical content. Color is even used within the text to highlight logical relationships. Applications abound! The study of conformal and equiareal functions is grounded in its application to cartography. Evolutes, involutes and cycloids are introduced through Christiaan Huygens' fascinating story: in attempting to solve the famous longitude problem with a mathematically-improved pendulum clock, he invented mathematics that would later be applied to optics and gears. Clairaut’s Theorem is presented as a conservation law for angular momentum. Green’s Theorem makes possible a drafting tool called a planimeter. Foucault’s Pendulum helps one visualize a parallel vector field along a latitude of the earth. Even better, a south-pointing chariot helps one visualize a parallel vector field along any curve in any surface. In truth, the most profound application of differential geometry is to modern physics, which is beyond the scope of this book. The GPS in any car wouldn’t work without general relativity, formalized through the language of differential geometry. Throughout this book, applications, metaphors and visualizations are tools that motivate and clarify the rigorous mathematical content, but never replace it.
This text is intended for an advanced undergraduate (having taken linear algebra and multivariable calculus). It provides the necessary background for a more abstract course in differential geometry. The inclusion of diagrams is done without sacrificing the rigor of the material. For all readers interested in differential geometry.
This thoroughly modern introduction to undergraduate topology brings the most exciting and useful aspects of modern topology to the reader. Containing all the key results of basic topology, this book concentrates on uniting the most interesting aspects of the subject with aspects that are most useful to research. It is suitable for self-study, and will leave the reader both motivated and well prepared for further study.
This book comprehensively presents topics, such as Dirac notation, tensor analysis, elementary differential geometry of moving surfaces, and k-differential forms. Additionally, two new chapters of Cartan differential forms and Dirac and tensor notations in quantum mechanics are added to this second edition. The reader is provided with hands-on calculations and worked-out examples at which he will learn how to handle the bra-ket notation, tensors, differential geometry, and differential forms; and to apply them to the physical and engineering world. Many methods and applications are given in CFD, continuum mechanics, electrodynamics in special relativity, cosmology in the Minkowski four-dimensional spacetime, and relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Tensors, differential geometry, differential forms, and Dirac notation are very useful advanced mathematical tools in many fields of modern physics and computational engineering. They are involved in special and general relativity physics, quantum mechanics, cosmology, electrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and continuum mechanics. The target audience of this all-in-one book primarily comprises graduate students in mathematics, physics, engineering, research scientists, and engineers.
Elementary Differential Geometry focuses on the elementary account of the geometry of curves and surfaces. The book first offers information on calculus on Euclidean space and frame fields. Topics include structural equations, connection forms, frame fields, covariant derivatives, Frenet formulas, curves, mappings, tangent vectors, and differential forms. The publication then examines Euclidean geometry and calculus on a surface. Discussions focus on topological properties of surfaces, differential forms on a surface, integration of forms, differentiable functions and tangent vectors, congruence of curves, derivative map of an isometry, and Euclidean geometry. The manuscript takes a look at shape operators, geometry of surfaces in E, and Riemannian geometry. Concerns include geometric surfaces, covariant derivative, curvature and conjugate points, Gauss-Bonnet theorem, fundamental equations, global theorems, isometries and local isometries, orthogonal coordinates, and integration and orientation. The text is a valuable reference for students interested in elementary differential geometry.

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