This edited collection brings together internationally renowned scholars to explore green criminology through the interdisciplinary lenses of power, harm and justice. The chapters provide innovative case study analyses from around the world that seek to advance theoretical, policy and practice discourses about environmental harm.
Explores the ways in which governments, transnational corporations, military apparatuses and ordinary people routinely harm environments, other animals and humanity.
This book brings together original cutting edge work that deals with global environmental harm from a wide variety of geographical and critical perspectives. The topics covered in the book are global, regional and local in nature, although in each case there are clear transnational or global dimensions. The book explores topics that provide theoretical, methodological and substantive insights into the nature and dynamics of environmental harm, and the transference of this harm across regions, continents and globally. Specific topics include the criminal nature of global warming, an ethnographic study of pollution and consciousness of environmental harm, environmental destruction associated with huge industrial developments, chaos theory and environmental social justice, de-forestation as a global phenomenon, illegal trade in endangered species, and transference of toxicity. The collection as a whole reinforces the importance of eco-global criminology as a dynamic paradigm for theory and action on environmental issues in the 21st century. The criminological perspectives presented herein are important both in discerning the nature and complexities of global environmental harms and, ultimately, in forging responses to them.
The application of criminological perspectives to discussion of the environment is a rapidly developing field at the cutting edge of criminology. This innovative but accessible introduction to the key debates in green criminology both familiarises newcomers to the field with the core theories and methodological precepts and challenges them to take a critical approach. In addition to analysing an extensive range of contemporary issues – environmental harm, food and water security, fracking, climate change and genetically modified crops – the text steps back to examine overarching themes, including the power relationships between states, corporations and the human and non-human components of our environment. In this way, Exploring Green Crime prepares readers to approach environmental criminology with a questioning and analytical mind-set. With useful end of chapter summaries, review questions and further reading, the text is ideal for students of criminology, criminal justice, law, sociology and environmental studies.
The essays selected for this volume illustrate the growing interest in and importance of crime that is both environmental and transnational in nature. The topics covered range from pollution and waste to biodiversity and wildlife crimes, and from the violation of human rights associated with the exploitation of natural resources through to the criminogenic implications of climate change. The collection provides insight into the nature and dynamics of this type of crime and examines in detail who is harmed and what can be done about it. Differential victimisation and contemporary developments in environmental law enforcement are also considered. Collectively, these essays lay the foundations for a criminology that is forward looking, global in its purview, and that deals with the key environmental issues of the present age.
This unique study of social harm offers a systematic and critical discussion of the nature of environmental harm from an eco-justice perspective, challenging conventional criminological definitions of environmental harm. The book evaluates three interconnected justice-related approaches to environmental harm: environmental justice (humans), ecological justice (the environment) and species justice (non-human animals). It provides a critical assessment of environmental harm by interrogating key concepts and exploring how activists and social movements engage in the pursuit of justice. It concludes by describing the tensions between the different approaches and the importance of developing an eco-justice framework that to some extent can reconcile these differences. Using empirical evidence built on theoretical foundations with examples and illustrations from many national contexts, "Environmental harm" will be of interest to students and academics in criminology, sociology, law, geography, environmental studies, philosophy and social policy all over the world -- P. 4 of cover.
Building on knowledge within the fields of green and eco-global criminology, this book uses empirical and theoretical arguments to discuss the multi-dimensional character of eco-global crime. It provides an overview of eco-global crimes and discusses them from a justice perspective. The persistence of animal abuse and speciesism are also examined together with policies aimed at controlling the natural world and plant species. Pollution by large corporations, rights of indigenous peoples and the damage caused by the mineral extraction are also considered. Providing new ideas and insights which will be relevant on a global scale, this book is an interesting and useful study of the exploitation of nature and other species. It will be invaluable for students and scholars globally, working within or connected to the field of green and eco-global criminology. The book will also be important for the participants of various social movements, especially the environmental and animal advocacy movements.
Few criminologists have drawn attention to the fact that widespread and significant forms of harm such as green or environmental crimes are neglected by criminology. Others have suggested that green crimes present the most important challenge to criminology as a discipline. This book argues that criminology needs to take green harms more seriously and to be revolutionized so that it forms part of the solution to the large environmental problems currently faced across the world. It asks how criminology should be redesigned to consider green/environmental harm as a key area of study in an era where destruction of the earth and the world’s ecosystem is a major concern and examines why this has remained unaccomplished so far. The chapters in this book apply an environmental frame of reference underlying a green approach to issues which can be addressed from within criminology and which can encourage criminologists and environmentalists to respond and react differently to environmental crime.
Over the last two decades, "green criminology" has emerged as a unique area of study, bringing together criminologists and sociologists from a wide range of research backgrounds and varying theoretical orientations. It spans the micro to the macro—from individual-level environmental crimes and victimization to business/corporate violations and state transgressions. There have been few attempts, however, to explicitly or implicitly integrate cultural criminology into green criminology (or vice versa). This book moves towards articulating a green cultural criminological perspective. Brisman and South examine existing overlapping research and offer a platform to support future excursions by green criminologists into cultural criminology’s concern with media images and representations, consumerism and consumption, and resistance. At the same time, they offer an invitation to cultural criminologists to adopt a green view of the consumption landscape and the growth (and depictions) of environmental harms. Green Cultural Criminology is aimed at students, academics, criminologists, and sociologists with an interest in green criminology and cultural criminology: two of the most exciting new areas in criminology today.
This book of eleven chapters and an Introduction is by and about women, the harms and crimes to which they are subjected as a result of global social processes and their efforts to take control of their own futures. The chapters explore the criminogenic and damaging consequences of the policies of the global financial institutions as well as the effects of growing economic polarisation both in pockets of the developed world and most markedly in the global south. Reflecting on this evidence, in the Introduction the editors necessarily challenge existing criminological theory by expanding and elaborating a conception of social harm that encompasses this range of problems, and exposes where new solutions derived from criminological theory are necessary. A second theme addresses human rights from the standpoint of indigenous women, minority women and those seeking refuge. Inadequate and individualised as the human rights instruments presently are, for most of these women a politics of human rights emerges as central to the achieving of legal and political equality and protection from individual violence. Women in the poorest countries, however, are sceptical as to the efficacy of rights claims in the face of the depredations of international and global capital, and the social dislocation produced thereby. Nonetheless this is a hopeful book, emphasising the contribution which academic work can make, provided the methodology is appropriately gendered and sufficiently sensitive in its guiding ideology and techniques to hear and learn from the all too often 'glocalised' other. But in the end there is no solution without politics, and in both the opening and the closing sections of this book there are chapters which address this. What continues to be special about women's political practice is the connection between the groundedness of small groups and the fluidity and flexibility of regional and international networks: the effective politics of the global age. This book, then, is a new criminology for and by women, a book which opens up a new criminological terrain for both women and men - and a book which cannot easily be read without an emotional response.
This groundbreaking text provides students with an overview and assessment of green criminology as well as a call to action. Green Criminology draws attention to the ways in which the political-economic organization of capitalism causes ecological destruction and disorganization. Focusing on real-world issues of green crime and environmental justice, chapters examine ecological withdrawals, ecological additions, toxic towns, wildlife poaching and trafficking, environmental laws, and nongovernmental environmental organizations. The book also presents an unintimidating introduction to research from the physical sciences on issues such as climate change, pollution levels, and the ecological footprint of humans, providing a truly interdisciplinary foundation for green criminological analysis. To help students succeed in the course—and to encourage them to see themselves as future green criminology researchers—the end-of-chapter study guides include: • Questions and Activities for Students that review topics students should be able to conceptualize and address. • Lessons for Researchers that suggest additional areas of research in the study of green crime.
'Following the outstanding introduction by the authors there are fifteen excellent original articles devoted to an integrated theory of the relationship between the state and crime. This work is on the cutting edge of critical criminology. It is a must read.' - William J. Chambliss, Professor of Sociology, The George Washington University, USA. 'This book is a superb compilation of original papers by an impressive roster of authors. While the articles cover a wide range of empirical issues, from Northern Ireland and corporate crime to youth crime and heterosexual hegemony they all explore the implications, strategies and mechanisms of state power. There isn't a weak paper here: all are extensively documented, well written, persuasive and scholarly in the very best sense.' - Professor Laureen Snider, Queens University, Canada 'State, Power, Crime is a hugely important book for these times. Bringing together some of the most original minds in criminology it offers a critical analysis of the state, how it constructs crime, responds to it and, at times, engages in the very same. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in justice, freedom and equality.' - Paddy Rawlinson, London School of Economics Featuring contributions by many of the leading scholars in the field, this seminal text explores the key themes and debates on state power today, in relation to crime and social order. It critically evaluates a range of substantive areas of criminological concern, including terrorism, surveillance, violence and the media. State, Power, Crime provides: "historical overviews of key theories about state power " assessment of the relationship between crime, criminal justice and the state " analysis of the development of law and order policy " discussion of the impact of structural fissures such as gender, race and sexuality " an overview of current research and writing " critical reflection on the future direction of research and analysis " advice on further reading. In 1978, with the publication of Hall et al's Policing the Crisis and Poulantzas's State, Power, Socialism, the complexity of the state's interventions in maintaining a capitalist social order were laid bare for critical criminological analysis. State, Power, Crime offers an up-to-date and comprehensive examination of the challenges posed by state power, in relation to both criminal and social justice.
The politics and science of health and disease remain contested terrain among scientists, health practitioners, policy makers, industry, communities, and the public. Stakeholders in disputes about illnesses or conditions disagree over their fundamental causes as well as how they should be treated and prevented. This thought-provoking book crosses disciplinary boundaries by engaging with both public health policy and social science, asserting that science, activism, and policy are not separate issues and showing how the contribution of environmental factors in disease is often overlooked.
This is the first book to provide a critical criminological perspective on sport and the connections between sport and crime. It draws on the inter-disciplinary nature of criminology and incorporates emerging perspectives like social harm, gender and sexuality, and green criminology. Written from an international perspective, it covers topics including sports scandals and the possibility of crime prevention through sport. American football, boxing, soccer and sumo are all examined. The book considers both sports law and the sociology of sport and will be essential reading for students and academics in these fields.
As politicians and the media perpetuate the stereotype of the "common criminal," crimes committed by the powerful remain for the most part invisible, or are reframed as a "bad decision" or a "rare mistake." This is a topic that remains marginalized within the field of criminology and criminal justice, yet crimes of the powerful cause more harm, perpetuate more inequalities, and result in more victimization than street crimes. Crimes of the Powerful: An introduction is the first textbook to bring together and show the symbiotic relationships between the related fields of state crime, white-collar crime, corporate crime, financial crime, organized crime, and environmental crime. Dawn L. Rothe and David Kauzlarich introduce the many types of crimes, methodological issues associated with research, theoretical relevance, and issues surrounding regulations and social controls for crimes of the powerful. Themes covered include: media, culture, and the Hollywoodization of crimes of the powerful; theoretical understanding and the study of the crimes of the powerful; a typology of crimes of the powerful with examples and case studies; victims of the crimes of the powerful; the regulation and resistance of elite crime. An ideal introductory text for both undergraduate and postgraduate students taking modules on the crimes of the powerful, white-collar crime, state crime, and green criminology, this text includes chapter summaries, activities and discussion questions, and lists of additional resources including films, websites, and additional readings.
Crimes Against Nature provides a systematic account and analysis of the key concerns of green criminology, written by one of the leading authorities in the field. The book draws upon the disciplines of environmental studies, environmental sociology and environmental management as well as criminology and socio-legal studies, and draws upon a wide range of examples of crimes against the environment – ranging from toxic waste, logging, wildlife smuggling, bio-piracy, the use and transport of ozone depleting substances through to illegal logging and fishing, water pollution and animal abuse. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 sets out theoretical approaches and perspectives on the subject; Part 2 explores the (national and international) dimensions of environmental crime and the explanations for it; Part 3 deals with the range of responses to environmental crime - environmental law enforcement, regulation, environmental crime prevention and the role of global institutions and movements.
The book presents discussions of the application of Stan Cohen's theories alongside empirical contributions in the fields of critical and green criminology. Taken together, the authors critically address harms and crimes against the environment, as well as against human and nonhuman victims.
Alternative Criminologies celebrates a kaleidoscopic process of permanent critique and a diversity of social and scientific knowledges. It examines complex and global crime issues in light of the many alternative scientific, artistic, empathetic, campaigning and otherwise imaginative criminologies that attempt to understand and/or fundamentally change why crime and justice take the forms they do. From cutting edge topics such as crimes against humanity, the criminology of mobility, terrorism, cybercrime, corporate crime and green criminology; to gendered perspectives on violence against women, sexualities and feminist and queer criminologies; to key issues in penology such as mass incarceration, the death penalty, desistance from crime, risk and the political economy of punishment; Alternative Criminologies demonstrates the breadth, the variety and the vibrancy of contemporary perspectives on crime, criminalization and punishment. Bringing together 34 leading experts from around the world, this international collection unites fresh and insightful theoretical positions with innovative empirical research and marks an important juncture for criminologies and their imagined futures. Alternative Criminologies is essential reading for students of crime and criminal justice.
This revised and expanded Third Edition of the internationally acclaimed Criminological Perspectives is the most comprehensive reader available in the field. Wide-ranging and global in scope and coverage, Criminological Perspectives will enable you to critically engage with the various concepts and theoretical positions that you'll encounter throughout your studies. In addition to essays that have had a seminal influence on the development of criminology, new articles have been included to cover topics of contemporary criminological significance, including: - surveillance - digitized crime - terrorism and political violence - environmental crime - human trafficking - techno-social networks - narco-crime - global inequalities The 56 articles are organised thematically, complete with introductions that place them in context and to illustrate the approaches taken by different schools of criminological thought. Criminological Perspectives will prove an indispensible resource, whether you're studying criminology, criminal justice studies, socio-legal studies, penology, security studies, surveillance studies, or sociology.
"This book provides an overview and assessment of green criminology. Based on a political-economic analysis, Green Criminology draws attention to the ways in which the political-economic organization of capitalism causes ecological destruction and disorganization. Focusing on real-world impact, chapters include political-economic examinations of ecological withdrawals, ecological additions, toxic towns, wildlife poaching and trafficking, environmental justice, environmental laws, and nongovernment environmental organizations. The book also explores how ecological footprint, planetary boundary analysis, and other scientific research applies to green criminological analysis"--Provided by publisher.

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