The work of Erving Goffman has had an enormous impact throughout the social sciences. Yet his writings have not received the detailed scrutiny which they deserve. This new book is the first comprehensive and accessible account of Erving Goffman's contributions, ranging in its scope from his very earliest work right up to the projects upon which he was engaged at the time of his death. Goffman's writings, Manning argues, are much more systematic and conceptually powerful than is ordinarily acknowledged. The book thus offers a defence of Goffman's writings as well as providing an introduction for those who have no prior acquaintance with Goffman's ideas.
This is a stimulating guide to the lives, works and legacies of 24 of the most influential thinkers in sociology. The book gives a clear and contextualized introduction to classical and contemporary theory, illuminating complex ideas with examples from the everyday world. It continues to be an essential text for all students of sociological theory.
The second edition of this popular and established text provides a comprehensive guide to 23 of the most influential thinkers in sociology. Written by leading academics in the field, Key Sociological Thinkers 2e provides a clear and contextualized introduction to classical and contemporary theory. Each chapter offers an insightful assessment of a different theorist, exploring their lives, works and legacies. Drawing upon examples from the everyday world, an innovative 'Seeing Things Differently' section in every chapter demonstrates how theoretical ideas can be used to illuminate aspects of social life in new ways. Included in this new edition: • Four new chapters, looking at Theodor Adorno, Michael Mann, Dorothy Smith and Zygmunt Bauman • Chapter updates on recent developments • An important new introduction • Three types of contents page to provide easy navigation of the text • Useful glossary boxes throughout, with their own dedicated contents page, to highlight and explain complex theoretical ideas. Key Sociological Thinkers 2e provides a stimulating overview of the best of sociological thought, from Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Georg Simmel to Nancy Chodorow, Michel Foucault and Anthony Giddens. It continues to be an essential text for all students of sociological theory.
This comprehensive volume ranges across the entire spectrum of contemporary sociological inquiry, as seen by Durkheim. It also includes secondary readings by social thinkers of today, connecting the classic writings of Durkheim to contemporary issues. Organizes Durkheim's writings thematically, in a comprehensive collection Includes selections from Durkheim's best-known writings as well as less widely-known texts that explore the themes of modern sociology Contains secondary readings by key contemporary social thinkers today Connects the classic writings of Durkheim to contemporary issues Includes a substantial editorial introduction by a leading Durkheim scholar
Despite the massive growth of mobile technologies, very little research has been done on how these technologies influence human interaction. Most of the published work in this area focuses on technological aspects and not on the social implications the technology is having on society. This book aims to fill this gap by providing an overview of these issues. It identifies the major trends, discusses the main claims made about the mobile age, and looks at issues which affect design, usability and evaluation. This unique look at the mobile age provides many interesting and important insights and will appeal to anyone designing, testing, or studying mobile devices.
This book examines the connection between sociology and the challenges faced by the modern military. Military sociology has received little attention in the broader academic world, and is mostly focused on civil-military relations. This book seeks to address this gap and combines ideas, theories and insights from sociology’s founding authors, with each chapter focusing on a specific thinker. There are chapters on Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Georg Simmel, Jane Addams, W. E. B. Du Bois, Erving Goffman, Michel Foucault, Morris Janowitz, Norbert Elias, Cornelis Lammers, Arlie Russell Hochschild, Cynthia Enloe and Bruno Latour, and each essay discusses their ideas and theories in relation to topics that are of concern in and around the military today. Military studies are taken in a broad sense here, so the volume encompasses a wide range of issues, including civil-military relations, military-political affairs, performance and outcomes of military operations, and organizational arrangements including technology and the composition, performance and well-being of personnel. The book intends to provide views and insights that will help the military to innovate their organizations and practices, not necessarily in the usual functional way of innovating (i.e. faster, more precise, etc.) but in a broader way. This book will be of great interest to students of sociology, military studies, civil-military relations, war and conflict studies, and IR in general.
The Presentation of Self in Contemporary Social Life covers the popular theories of Erving Goffman, and shows modern applications of dramaturgical analysis in a wide range of social contexts. David Shulman’s innovative new text demonstrates how Goffman’s ideas, first introduced in 1959, continue to inspire research into how we manage the impressions that others form about us. He synthesizes the work of contemporary scholars who use dramaturgical approaches from several disciplines, who recognize that many values, social norms, and laws have changed since Goffman’s time, and that contemporary society offers significant new forms of impression management that we can engage in and experience. After a general introduction to dramaturgical sociology, readers will see many examples of how Goffman’s ideas can provide powerful insights into familiar aspects of contemporary life today, including business and the workplace, popular culture, the entertainment industry, and the digital world.
Part of the SAGE Social Thinker series, this book serves as a concise and inviting introduction to the life and works of Erving Goffman, one of the most prominent social theorists in postwar sociology. Goffman’s ideas continue to influence scholars in various fields and have also attracted many readers outside conventional academia. Goffman’s overall research agenda was the exploration of what he termed the interaction order—that is, the micro social order that regulates the co-mingling of people in each other’s immediate presence. He coined several new concepts (face-work, impression management, role distance, civil inattention, etc.) with which to grasp and understand the complexities and basic social restructuring of everyday life, many of which are now part of sociology’s standard vocabulary.
In this book Jeffrey Alexander develops the view that cultural sociology and “cultural pragmatics” are vital for understanding the structural turbulence and political possibilities of contemporary social life. Central to Alexander’s approach is a new model of social performance that combines elements from both the theatrical avant-garde and modern social theory. He uses this model to shed new light on a wide range of social actors, movements, and events, demonstrating through striking empirical examples the drama of social life. Producing successful dramas determines the outcome of social movements and provides the keys to political power. Modernity has neither eliminated aura nor suppressed authenticity; on the contrary, they are available to social actors who can perform them in compelling ways. This volume further consolidates Alexander’s reputation as one of the most original social thinkers of our time. It will be of great interest to students and scholars in sociology and cultural studies as well as throughout the social sciences and humanities.
This revised edition of this extremely popular introduction to social theory has been carefully and thoroughly updated with the latest developments in this continually changing field. Written in a refreshingly lucid and engaging style, Introducing Social Theory provides readers with a wide-ranging, well organized and thematic introduction to all the major thinkers, issues and debates in classical and contemporary social theory. Introducing Social Theory traces the development of social theorizing from the classical ideas about modernity of Durkheim, Marx and Weber, right up to a uniquely accessible review of the contemporary theoretical controversies in sociology that surround post-colonialism, gender and feminist theories, and public sociology. The ideal textbook for students of sociology at all levels, from A-level to undergraduates, Introducing Social Theory is remarkably easy to follow and understand. This new edition lives up to its predecessors' goal that students need never be intimidated by social theory again.
Great Minds revisits key social thinkers that have made significant, distinctive, and controversial contributions to the development of modern social theory.
The Blackwell Companion to Major Contemporary Social Theorists is a survey of contemporary social theory that focuses on the thinkers themselves. In original essays especially commissioned for this volume, leading experts and practitioners examine the life and work of 13 major theorists such as Elias, Baudrillard, Giddens, and Butler. Includes 13 original essays by leading scholars on major contemporary social theorists. Covers key figures such as Elias, Goffman, Foucault, Habermas, Giddens, Bourdieu, and Butler. Essays include biographical sketches, the social and intellectual context, and the impact of the thinker's work on social theory generally. Includes bibliographies of the theorist's most important works as well as key secondary works. Can be used in conjunction with The Blackwell Companion to Major Classical Social Theorists, edited by George Ritzer, for a complete reference source in social theory.
The Goffman Reader aims to bring the most complete collection of Erving Goffman's (1922-1982) writing and thinking as a sociologist. Among the most inventive, unique and individualistic of thinkers in American sociology, his works first appeared in the early 1950's at a time when a more formal, traditional sociology dominated the scene. In this collection, Goffman's work is arranged into four categories: the production of self, the confined self, the nature of social life, and the framing of experience. Through this arrangement, readers will not only be presented with Goffman's thinking in chronological order, but also with a framework of analysis that clearly introduces the social theoretical ideas by which Goffman shaped the direction of sociological thought through the late twentieth century.
Sociological Theory is an attempt to trace the development of sociological theory from the classical to the modern period. A comprehensive and balanced introduction, it studies all the important thinkers chronologically so that the students can locate the continuity as well as the discontinuity of thoughts and themes. A concise formative background of every thinker is outlined in the text to entice the reader to take a deeper plunge into the theories. The introductory chapter tries to sketch the broad outlines of the classical sociological theories whereas the concluding chapter examines the thematic shifts and the inter-linkage between all the theories from the classical to contemporary period. All chapters are pedagogically rich with glossary, keywords and discussion points. The language is lucid and comprehensible and the treatment of the text is such that it develops an appreciation for the subject.
Erving Goffman was one of the most pre–eminent authors of the post–war period in social science. His ideas have had an extraordinary influence and have become well known to a wide audience. This is the first systematic appraisal of the legacy of his work. The book brings together a group of eminent scholars from sociology, linguistics and social psychology, all of whom are internationally known for their own work. Contributors include Adam Kendon, Randall Collins, Robin Williams, Emanuel A. Schegloff, Christian Heath, Stephen C. Levinson, P.M. Strong and Anthony Giddens. The contributors analyse and seek to build on Goffman′s work in a sympathetic yet critical way. Some chapters describe the main parameters of the "interaction order", as Goffman portrays it, serving as a useful introduction to his approach. Others show how future investigations of the interaction order may be developed. This book will become a standard source for undergraduates and postgraduates in linguistics, social psychology and sociology, and for anyone interested in the development of modern social theory in general.
This book demonstrates that theory in literary and cultural studies has moved beyond overarching master theories towards a greater awareness of particularity and contingency – including its own. What is the place of literary and cultural theory after the Age of Theory has ended? Grouping its chapters into rubrics of metatheory, cultural theory, critical theory and textual theory, the collection demonstrates that the practice of “doing theory” has neither lost its vitality nor can it be in any way dispensable. Current directions covered include the renewed interest in phenomenology, the increased acknowledgement of the importance of media history for all cultural practices and formations, complexity studies, new narratology, literary ethics, cultural ecology, and an intensified interest in textual as well as cultural matter.
This major study develops a new account of modernity and its relation to the self. Building upon the ideas set out in The Consequences of Modernity, Giddens argues that 'high' or 'late' modernity is a post traditional order characterised by a developed institutional reflexivity. In the current period, the globalising tendencies of modern institutions are accompanied by a transformation of day-to-day social life having profound implications for personal activities. The self becomes a 'reflexive project', sustained through a revisable narrative of self identity. The reflexive project of the self, the author seeks to show, is a form of control or mastery which parallels the overall orientation of modern institutions towards 'colonising the future'. Yet it also helps promote tendencies which place that orientation radically in question - and which provide the substance of a new political agenda for late modernity. In this book Giddens concerns himself with themes he has often been accused of unduly neglecting, including especially the psychology of self and self-identity. The volumes are a decisive step in the development of his thinking, and will be essential reading for students and professionals in the areas of social and political theory, sociology, human geography and social psychology.

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