Ethnographic Research: A Reader presents in a single volume a selection of ten recently published studies intended to illustrate the variety of social research which is currently being conducted within the ethnographic tradition. Together with an accompanying editorial introduction and a carefully selected range of Guided Reading Exercises, this text should provide students with solid grounding of the different underlying assumptions, researchers' positions, methods of data collection and theoretical approaches within this broadly defined research tradition. The collection includes research from a range of different countries (Britain, The USA, Australia, Lebanon and India) and studies from a multitude of disciplines and contexts inc
As Anna and Layla reckon with illness, risk, and loss in different ways, they learn the power of friendship and the importance of hope.
In simple and non-technical terms, this text illustrates a wide range of techniques and approaches used in social research projects.
Doing Social Science Research gives an introductory overview of the process of social research, from research design to data collection and analysis. It provides students and teachers with a mix of resources to help them to get to grips with the main methods of social research. These resources include a set of self-directed activities designed to get students using research methods, as well as a set of readings to support these activities. The readings also provide critical discussions and examples of the range of research methods. The text offers a comprehensive introduction to the full range of research methods in the social sciences, such as: · Survey research · Experimental research · Statistical analysis · Interview research · Ethnographic research · Qualitative data analysis · Discourse analysis The text clearly explains what these methods involve, as well as their basic relationship to arguments in the philosophy of social science. It will provide students and researchers with essential guidance on how to select the most appropriate method in their own research, as well as understanding and evaluating research conducted by others. Doing Social Science Research will be an invaluable resource for students taking introductory courses in social research at both postgraduate and undergraduate level. It is a set text for the Open University's Social Science Postgraduate Foundation Module (D820 The Challenge of the Social Sciences).
`This collection of classic essays in the study of visual culture fills a major gap in this new and expanding intellectual field. Its major strength is its insistence on the importance of three central aspects of the study of visual culture: the sign, the institution and the viewing subject. It will provide readers, teachers and students with an essential text in visual and cultural studies' - Janet Wolff, University of Rochester Visual Culture provides an invaluable resource of over 30 key statements from a wide range of disciplines, including four editorial essays which place the readings in their historical and theoretical context. Although underpinned by a focus on contemporary cultural theory, this Reader puts the study of visual culture and the rhetoric of the image at centre stage. Divided into three parts: Cultures of the Visual; Regulating Photographic Meaning; and Looking and Subjectivity, the Reader enables students to make hitherto unmade connections between art, film and photography history and theory, history, semiotics and communications, media studies, and cultural theory. Visual Culture sets the agenda for the study of Visual Culture and will be essential reading for researchers and students alike.
Ethnography is an increasingly important research method in the private sector, yet ethnographic literature continues to focus on an academic audience. Sam Ladner fills the gap by advancing rigorous ethnographic practice that is tailored to corporate settings where colleagues are not steeped in social theory, research time lines may be days rather than months or years, and research sponsors expect actionable outcomes and recommendations. Ladner provides step-by-step guidance at every turn--covering core methods, research design, using the latest mobile and digital technologies, project and client management, ethics, reporting, and translating your findings into business strategies. This book is the perfect resource for private-sector researchers, designers, and managers seeking robust ethnographic tools or academic researchers hoping to conduct research in corporate settings. More information on the book is available at http://www.practicalethnography.com/.
Love in the Time of Ethnography explores love – variously defined – as an important facet of human life and a worthy focus of study. The authors look at love in association with an Alevi and Sunni couple in Turkey, organizers of Mexican American and immigrant youth movements, Christian missionaries in China, an elderly man with dementia, two women “coming home” to queer identity, a White researcher working with Black women in the US, the common ground between Dōgen’s Zen teachings and Habermas's critical theory, an Albanian Sufi community in Michigan and interactions between humans and the natural world. It also includes theoretical writing on the place of love in social analysis, whether this involves relationships between researchers and participants or the nature of human connection itself. The authors argue that social research is an affective process as well as a cognitive one, and that fellow feeling is an essential component of making sense of the world. Along with more traditional scholarly forms, the contributors to this book use auto-ethnography, life stories, archival research and poetry, noting that style itself conveys information and emotion. Writing is always to some extent partisan. While anthropologists and other social researchers have explored this idea over the last few decades, they have more often explored it with an eye to critique than to the ideals underlying that critique. This is a collection of essays about what ethnographers are aiming for as well as the problems they address, and the authors discuss ethical principles like agape, hizmet and cariño as rationales for ethnography and rationales for social change.
Most of the chapters in this book are extended papers from Research Learning in Virtual Environments (reLIVE08), an international conference held by the UK Open University in Milton Keynes in November 2008. Authors of the best papers and presentations from the conferences were invited to contribute to Research Learning in Virtual Worlds, the first book to specifically address research methods and related issues for education in virtual worlds. The book covers a range of research undertaken in virtual worlds. It opens with an accessible introduction both to the book and to the subject area, making it an ideal springboard for those who are new to research in this area. The subsequent ten chapters present work covering a range of research methodologies across a broad discipline base, providing essential reading for advanced undergraduate or postgraduate researchers working in education in virtual worlds, and engaging background material for researchers in similar and related disciplines.
The methodology researching of educational policy is the subject of this book. It takes a "behind the scenes" look at the conducting, the analysis and the interpretation of research carried out into educational policy issues revolving around the 1988 Education Reform Act.; The contributors draw on their project research experience to demonstrate the breadth of issues lionked with such policy research, and cover the gender and power balance between interviewer and interviewee, the difficulties resulting from different ideological stances of researchers and researched, and difficulties in finding links between research and policy.
Bringing together key writings with original textbook material, the second edition of Media Studies: The Essential Resource explains central perspectives and concepts within Media Studies. Readers are introduced to a range of writing on media topics promoting an understanding of the subject from both contemporary and historical perspectives. The text is split into three parts covering Analysis and Perspectives, Media Audiences and Ecologies and Creativities. The key areas of study are discussed, with accessible readings from essential theoretical texts and fully supported with an author commentary. Theoretical perspectives are used to analyse contemporary media forms and activities direct students to interrogate readings further and apply their learning. Encouraging critical and analytical study, Media Studies: The Essential Resource helps students to understand the main theories and theorists within Media Studies.
This book provides a view into the groundbreaking application of ethnographic tools and techniques to the understanding of undergraduate students and their use of information. The publication describes findings of the work at the University of Rochester River Campus Libraries and provides insight into how academic librarians might use these techniques on their own campuses.
‘Being in the zone' means performing in a distinctive, unusual, pleasurable and highly competent way at something you already regularly do: dancing or playing a viola, computer programming, tennis and much more. What makes the zone special? This volume offers groundbreaking research that brings sociological and cultural studies to bear on the idea of being in the zone. There is original research on musicians, dancers and surfers which shows that being in the zone far from being exclusively individualised and private but must be understood as social and collective and possibly accessible to all. The zone is not just for elite performers. Being in the zone is not just the province of the athlete who suddenly and seemingly without extra effort swims faster or jumps higher or the musician who suddenly plays more than perfectly, but also of the doctor working under intense pressure or the computer programmer staying up all night. The meaning of such experiences for convincing people to work in intense conditions, often with short term contracts, is explored to show how being in the zone can have problematic effects and have negative and constraining as well as creative and productive implications. Often being in the zone is understood from a psychological viewpoint but this can limit our understanding. This volume provides the first in-depth analysis of being in the zone from social and cultural viewpoints drawing on a range of theories and novel evidence. Written in a stimulating and accessible style, Culture, Identity and Intense Performativity: Being in the Zone will strongly appeal to students and researchers who aim to understand the experience of work, creativity, musicianship and sport. Issues of the body are also central to being in the zone and will make this book relevant to anyone studying bodies and embodiment . This collection will establish being in the zone as an important area of enquiry for social science and the humanities.
Urban ethnography is the firsthand study of city life by investigators who immerse themselves in the worlds of the people about whom they write. Since its inception in the early twentieth century, this great tradition has helped define how we think about cities and city dwellers. The past few decades have seen an extraordinary revival in the field, as scholars and the public at large grapple with the increasingly complex and pressing issues that affect the ever-changing American city-from poverty to the immigrant experience, the changing nature of social bonds to mass incarceration, hyper-segregation to gentrification. As both a method of research and a form of literature, urban ethnography has seen a notable and important resurgence. This renewed interest demands a clear and comprehensive understanding of the history and development of the field to which this volume contributes by presenting a selection of past and present contributions to American urban ethnographic writing. Beginning with an original introduction highlighting the origins, practices, and significance of the field, editors Mitchell Duneier, Philip Kasinitz, and Alexandra Murphy guide the reader through the major and fascinating topics on which it has focused -- from the community, public spaces, family, education, work, and recreation, to social policy, and the relationship between ethnographers and their subjects. An indispensable guide, The Urban Ethnography Reader provides an overview of how the discipline has grown and developed while offering students and scholars a selection of some of the finest social scientific writing on the life of the modern city.
Conducting ethnographic fieldwork with children presents anthropologists with particular challenges and limitations, as well as rewards and insights. Children: Ethnographic Encounters presents ten vivid accounts of researchers' experiences of working with children across a variety of cultural contexts. Part of the Ethnographic Encounters series, the book offers honest reflections on successes as well as failures and shows that in all cases ? even those that 'failed' ? anthropologists can learn something about children's position in their social world. Going beyond the usual focus on North America and Europe, the text offers comparative insights into the nature of childhood in different societies. The chapters provide first-hand accounts of fieldwork with children in diverse geographical places such as Mexico, the Ecuadorian Amazon, Rwanda, central India, Thailand, Malaysia, and China. The book provides hope, encouragement and inspiration to anyone planning to undertake ethnographic fieldwork with children and provides important insights to students and researchers working in the growing field of anthropology of children and childhood, in childhood studies, and related fields.
The Routledge Handbook of Language and Creativity provides an introduction to and survey of a wide range of perspectives on the relationship between language and creativity. Defining this complex and multifaceted field, this book introduces a conceptual framework through which the various definitions of language and creativity can be explored. Divided into four parts, it covers: different aspects of language and creativity, including dialogue, metaphor and humour literary creativity, including narrative and poetry multimodal and multimedia creativity, in areas such as music, graffiti and the internet creativity in language teaching and learning. With over 30 chapters written by a group of leading academics from around the world, The Routledge Handbook of Language and Creativity will serve as an important reference for students and scholars in the fields of English language studies, applied linguistics, education, and communication studies.
The construction industry as a workplace is commonly seen as problematic for a number of reasons, including its worrying health and safety record, the instability of its workforce, and the poorly regulated nature of the sector. It is surprising therefore, that the sector and its working practices remain so under-theorised. Now though, there is a growing interest in and awareness of the utility of an ethnographic approach to the construction industry. Ethnographic Research in the Construction Industry draws together in one volume a set of expert contributions which demonstrate how social science perspectives, rooted in ethnographic research on construction sites and with construction workers themselves, can generate fresh insights into the social, cultural and material ways that the industry and conditions of work in it are experienced and played out. Each chapter develops discussion on the basis of an ethnographic case study to examine how theoretically informed ethnographic research can help us understand industry problems, and can challenge common perceptions of the construction industry. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of anthropology, sociology, geography and organization studies, as well as those from the built environment and related applied fields.
As a best-selling introductory book on the basics of social research, The Good Research Guide provides an accessible yet comprehensive introduction to the main approaches to social research and the methods most commonly used by researchers in the social sciences. This edition has been updated to account for recent developments in the field such as: The emergence of mixed methods approaches Increased use of internet research More frequent use of methods such as triangulation and focus groups Developments in research ethics Written for anyone undertaking a small-scale research project, either as part of an academic course or as part of their professional development, this book provides: A clear, straightforward introduction to data collection methods and data analysis Explanations of the key decisions researchers need to take, with practical advice on how to make appropriate decisions Essential checklists to guide good practice This book is perfect for the first-time researcher looking for guidance on the issues they should consider and traps they should avoid when embarking on a social research project.
Although written as a textbook, the contents are research led, informed by the author's own extensive experience of undertaking ethnographic research in dangerous and sensitive locations in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.
This critical introduction to the principles of social and educational research draws together a key set of readings which offers a comprehensive approach to the wide range of values and practice in social research. Issues explored include: the relationship between quantitative and qualitative methods; positivism and the role of the natural sciences as a model for social research; the purposes of research - knowledge or the transformation of the social world; issues of race, gender and power in social research; the politics and ethics of data collection; and the validity and relevance of social research. Social Research is a set book for The Open University course DEH313 Principles of Social and Educational Resear
Writing the New Ethnography provides a foundational understanding of the writing processes associated with composing new forms of qualitative writing in the social sciences. Goodall's distinctive style will engage and energize students, offering them provocative advice and exercises for turning qualitative data and field notes into compelling representations of social life.

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