Survival is hard in a land where no woman can live alone
When Blake's grandparents die suddenly, his world collapses. Parentless and friendless, he is taken in by a neighbouring farmer as hired help, where he meets the beautiful Annie, his employer's daughter. But Annie doesn't want to spend her life on the farm. Will he ever see her again? A gritty, emotional saga about love and second chances from a bestselling author. Perfect for fans of Dilly Court, Maggie Hope and Nadine Dorries.
Known as the "Prince of Preachers," Charles Haddon Spurgeon was among the most prolific and influential pastors of the 19th century. Characterized by profound insights and a passionate call for personal relationships with Christ, Spurgeon's work has stood the tests of time. Beloved even today, Spurgeon's sermons offer you the opportunity to grow in your own faith in a conveniently digital format, designed for your busy life on the go! Updated into modern language, with helpful explanatory footnotes, the text has been carefully proofed to ensure the highest quality and accuracy. Brought to you by the editors who translated the landmark work, Annals of the World, this first series of digital releases from the Spurgeon sermon collection is for the years 1855 and 1856 in one convenient digital file at an unbeatable price! All sermons are unabridged and include references to make it convenient for you to extend your Spurgeon studies. Easy to read and hard to forget, these are sermons of substance that will impact your life today!
The abridged version of Westermann's classic three-volume work on Genesis. This work presents a magisterial commentary in a condensed and more accessible form. Included are a fresh translation of Genesis, the philological reasoning behind the translation, an examination of the historical background of the original text, a survey of all that has been written about Genesis (together with full references) and a consideration of the problems and questions the text of Genesis raises for today.
Out in the furthest reaches of space, an assignment was given to a race of intelligent Light beings. The assignment was to go to a faraway system and create a world and a species so that souls could experience the creative powers of living in a Free Will system. This happened a long time ago, in our terms, and continues today. However, Free Will has some quirky aspects, as Jake Montana is going to learn. Excitement and change have many disguises, and things are not always as clear as they fi rst appear. Jake, a mild mannered, past-middle-age engineer for a major aerospace company just wants to retire and enjoy his hobbies and life in general. Little does he know that people from another planet are actively seeking him for reasons that are critical to their continued existence. Follow Jake as he experiences the ultimate abduction by people who have medieval technology, yet travel in advanced spacecraft. Witness how dogma crushes culture and tyranny can eliminate free thought. Discover a universe where peace and war lived side by side and didnt know it until the startling discovery of space travel. Journey to the star system, where one mans desire for absolute power transforms Jakes life. Mental changes occur that are as large and mind-altering as to affect the lives of all the inhabitants on two very separate worlds. Jake will meet, and join forces with, the most unlikely group of co-conspirators -some of them human, some not so human. The difference, Jake will fi nd, is just the labels that they are given. Jump into this metaphysical grab bag of travel, fun, intrigue and personal learning as Jake experiences the many shades of good and bad; not to mention two outstanding ladies, who have designs on him that are different from anything Jake could ever imagine.
Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity, what children feel at summer camp, but in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of colonists, explorers, pioneers, soldiers, and immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. Using letters, diaries, memoirs, medical records, and psychological studies, this wide-ranging book uncovers the profound pain felt by Americans on the move from the country's founding until the present day. Susan Matt shows how colonists in Jamestown longed for and often returned to England, African Americans during the Great Migration yearned for their Southern homes, and immigrants nursed memories of Sicily and Guadalajara and, even after years in America, frequently traveled home. These iconic symbols of the undaunted, forward-looking American spirit were often homesick, hesitant, and reluctant voyagers. National ideology and modern psychology obscure this truth, portraying movement as easy, but in fact Americans had to learn how to leave home, learn to be individualists. Even today, in a global society that prizes movement and that condemns homesickness as a childish emotion, colleges counsel young adults and their families on how to manage the transition away from home, suburbanites pine for their old neighborhoods, and companies take seriously the emotional toll borne by relocated executives and road warriors. In the age of helicopter parents and boomerang kids, and the new social networks that sustain connections across the miles, Americans continue to assert the significance of home ties. By highlighting how Americans reacted to moving farther and farther from their roots, Homesickness: An American History revises long-held assumptions about home, mobility, and our national identity.
Jesus said in John 10:11, The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly. I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for his sheep. He came to give us freedom from fear, debt, sickness, poverty, homelessness, unemployment, and anything that may prevents us from walking in the light of Gods Word. Now, whether you are a Sunday Church folk, a new believer or a longtime Christian who wants to read the message of faith, I Must Tell Jesus,will prove to you that no one has ever spoke the way that Jesus did. The Story of Jesus must be shared with every person on the face of the earth in order that each individual may have the opportunity to come to believe and follow Jesus. Christ tells us, as He told His disciples, you will be my witnesses in Jerusalelm, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). In order to fulfill Christs command, I Must Tell Jesus is written as a tribute to my family and the family of God. Thank You!
This volume of sermons reflects Davies' imaginary qualities as he puts himself in the shoes of both biblical characters and the members of his congregation, using Christological exegesis and his love of art to produce compassionate, credible, and relevant sermons.
An unflinching personal story of family, religion, and community that shows the horror of growing up in the shadow of religious fundamentalism.
Wie geht man damit um, wenn die eigenen Kinder ganz anders sind als man selbst, was bedeutet das für sie und ihre Familien? Und wie akzeptieren wir und unsere Gesellschaft außergewöhnliche Menschen? Ein eindrucksvolles Buch über das Elternsein, über die Kraft der Liebe, aber auch darüber, was unsere Identität ausmacht. Der Bestsellerautor Andrew Solomon hat mit über 300 Familien gesprochen, deren Kinder außergewöhnlich oder hochbegabt sind, die das Down-Syndrom haben oder an Schizophrenie leiden, Autisten, taub oder kleinwüchsig sind. Ihre Geschichten sind einzigartig, doch ihre Erfahrungen des „Andersseins“ sind universell. Ihr Mut, ihre Lebensfreude und ihr Glück konfrontieren uns mit uns selbst und lassen niemanden unberührt. »Solomon hat eine Ideengeschichte geschrieben, die zur Grundlage einer Charta der psychologischen Grundrechte des 21. Jahrhunderts werden könnte... Erkenntnisse voller Einsicht, Empathie und Klugheit.« Eric Kandel »Das vielleicht größte Geschenk dieses monumentalen, so faktenreichen wie anrührenden Werks besteht darin, dass es zum permanenten Nachdenken anregt.« Philip Gourevitch »Dieses Buch schießt einem Pfeil um Pfeil ins Herz.« The New York Times »Dies ist eines der außergewöhnlichsten Bücher, die ich in letzter Zeit gelesen habe: mutig, einfühlsam und zutiefst menschlich... Seine Geschichten sind von meisterhafter Feinfühligkeit und Klarheit.« Siddhartha Mukherjee, Autor von ›Der König aller Krankheiten‹
"The book is like a dream you want to last forever" (Roberta Silman, The New York Times Book Review), now with a gorgeous new cover by the famed designer Peter Mendelsund The Rings of Saturn—with its curious archive of photographs—records a walking tour of the eastern coast of England. A few of the things which cross the path and mind of its narrator (who both is and is not Sebald) are lonely eccentrics, Sir Thomas Browne’s skull, a matchstick model of the Temple of Jerusalem, recession-hit seaside towns, wooded hills, Joseph Conrad, Rembrandt’s "Anatomy Lesson," the natural history of the herring, the massive bombings of WWII, the dowager Empress Tzu Hsi, and the silk industry in Norwich. W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants (New Directions, 1996) was hailed by Susan Sontag as an "astonishing masterpiece perfect while being unlike any book one has ever read." It was "one of the great books of the last few years," noted Michael Ondaatje, who now acclaims The Rings of Saturn "an even more inventive work than its predecessor, The Emigrants."
Evacuated to England from Nazi Germany during World War II, several Jewish children struggle to observe Judaism, rebuild their lives, and search for their parents after the war.

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