A sweeping story of love, hurt and revenge, Far From My Father's House is a moving account of a young man's life and love after the First World War. As a child Blake is taken in by neighbors after the death of his grandparents and works for his keep on their farm. As a young man he falls in love with his employer's daughter, Annie. To build a life together, away from the farm, Blake is determined to make his name and leaves the farm to seek work in the shipyards of Sunderland. He swears one day he will come back for Annieâ??but can he be sure she will wait for him?
Survival is hard in a land where no woman can live alone
In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance. Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama's paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama's maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl). From the Trade Paperback edition.
It had not been a conscious decision to cling to the better memories of his childhood. It had just happened when Hannah came along and the possibility of a brighter future dragged his scowling face away from the details of his past. Now, standing in the middle of the poorly part-mowed field, in front of the house that was hiding all the reasons he had run away, he wondered if it would be possible to hold the past and present in tension.' Robbie Hanright has a normal, settled life in Dublin. With a wife and baby, an undemanding job and a nice home, everything is just as he wants it. However, after an enduring estrangement from the rural landscape of his youth, Robbie receives a phone call from his sister asking him to come home. Left with little choice, Robbie returns once more to County Down, and to Larkscroft Farm, to confront the father who tormented his childhood and face up to a history he wants only to forget. Set against the backdrop of a decaying farmhouse and fragile family connections, My Father's House is a powerful, lyrical story of loss and regret, through which Bethany Dawson reveals an affecting compassion for the profound, and often painful, complexities of family life.
For Anna, the narrator of Bo Caldwell's richly lyrical and vivid first novel, growing up in the magical world of Shanghai in the 1930s and 1940s creates a special bond between her and her father. He is the son of missionaries, a smuggler, and a millionaire who leads a charmed but secretive life. When the family flees to Los Angeles in the face of the Japanese occupation, he chooses to remain, believing his connections and luck will keep him safe. He's wrong. He survives, only to again choose Shanghai over his family during the Second World War. Anna and her father reconnect late in his life, when she finally has a family of her own, but it is only when she discovers his extensive journals that she is able to fully understand him and the reasons for his absences. With the intensity and appeal of When We Were Orphans, also set in Shanghai at the same time, The Distant Land of My Father tells a moving and unforgettable story about a most unusual father-daughter relationship.
A biography and family memoir by turns hilarious and heart-wrenching, Miranda Seymour's Thrumpton Hall is a riveting, frequently shocking, and ultimately unforgettable true story of the devastating consequences of obsessive desire and misplaced love. "Dear Thrumpton, how I miss you tonight." When twenty-one-year-old George Seymour wrote these words in 1944, the object of his affection was not a young woman but the beautiful country house in Nottinghamshire that he desired above all else. Miranda Seymour would later be raised at Thrumpton Hall—her upbringing far from idyllic, as life revolved around her father's odd capriciousness. The house took priority over everything, even his family—until the day when George Seymour, in his golden years, began dressing in black leather and riding powerful motorbikes around the countryside in the company of surprising friends. For fans of Downton Abbey—the show’s creator, Julian Fellowes, called it “brilliant, original, and intensely readable”—Thrumpton Hall is a poignant and memorable true story of family.
A young girl growing up in the forties on a vast estate near Munich lives a life charmed by privilege yet scarred by place and time. Everyday routine is upended as the estate becomes home to friends, family, Prussian royals, Polish peasants, and others displaced by the war. Rendered with insight, humor, and visual lyricism, Beatrix Ost's memoir testifies to the lasting influence of childhood experience. Beatrix Ostwas born in Stuttgart, Germany, in 1940. She studied dance in Munich and art with Oskar Kokoschka in Salzburg. Now a US resident, Ost divides her time between Charlottesville, Virginia, and New York City.
This eBook includes the full text of the book plus the following additional content: • 50 new photos from Jane Fonda’s personal and family archives, many often never seen in public • A free chapter from Jane Fonda’s Prime Time She is one of the most recognizable women of our time. America knows Jane Fonda as an actress and an activist, a feminist and a wife, a workout guru and a role model. Now, in this extraordinary memoir, Fonda reveals that she is so much more. From her youth among Hollywood’s elite and her early film career to the challenges and triumphs of her life today, Jane Fonda reveals intimate details and universal truths that she hopes “can provide a lens through which others can see their lives and how they can live them a little differently.” Fonda divides her “life so far” into three “acts,” writing about her childhood, first films, and marriage to Roger Vadim in Act One. At once a picture emerges: a child born to the acting legend Henry Fonda and the glamorous society princess Frances Seymour. But these early years are also marked by profound sadness: her mother’s mental illness and suicide when Jane is twelve years old, her father’s emotional distance, and her personal struggle to find her way in the world as a young woman. By her second act, Fonda lays the foundation for her activism, even as her career takes flight. She highlights her struggle to live consciously and authentically while remaining in the public eye as she recounts her marriages to Tom Hayden and Ted Turner, and examines her controversial and defining involvement with the Vietnam War. As her film career grows, Fonda learns to incorporate her roles into a larger vision of what matters most in her life–and in the process she wins two Academy Awards, for Klute and for Coming Home. In Fonda’s third act, she is prepared to do the work of a lifetime–to begin living consciously in a way that might inspire others who can learn from her experiences. Surprising, candid, and wonderfully written, Jane Fonda’s My Life So Far is filled with universal insights into the personal struggles of women living full and engaged lives.
For his final new series, New York Times mega-bestselling author E. Lynn Harris introduces Bentley L. Dean, owner of the hottest modeling agency in Miami's sexy South Beach. Only the world's most beautiful models make the roster of Picture Perfect Modeling agency and they only do shoots for the most elite photographers and magazines. They are fashionista royalty—and the owners, Bentley L. Dean and his beautiful partner Alexandra, know it. But even Picture Perfect isn't immune from hard times, so when Sterling Sneed, a rich, celebrity party planner promises to pay a ludicrously high fee for some models, Bentley finds he can't refuse. Even though the job is not exactly a photo shoot, Bentley agrees to supply fifteen gorgeous models as eye candy for an "A" list party—to look good, be charming and, well, entertain the guests. They don't have to do anything they don't want to, but... His models are pros and he figures they can handle the pressure, until one drops out and Bentley asks his protégé Jah, a beautiful kid who Bentley treats as if he were his own son, to substitute. Suddenly, the stakes are much higher, particularly when Jah falls in love with the hottest African American movie star in America. Seth Sinclair is very handsome, very famous, and very married—and his closeted gay life makes him very dangerous as well. Can Bentley's fatherly guidance save Jah from making a fatal mistake?
She was a beautiful blond child, a quintessential Canadian teenager: she loved Saturday film matinees, giggled at pyjama parties, ran for student president, led the cheerleading squad, went steady with the right boy and married him, her proud father at her side. But from the age of seven Sylvia Fraser shared her body with a 'twin' who lived a separate life from her. This other self was created to do the things Sylvia was too frightened, too ashamed, too repelled to do - the things her father made her do. As an adult, she had no recollection of a sexual relationship with her father, yet some connection always remained - pain, terror and guilt were never far from the surface. With tremendous power, candour and eloquence, Sylvia Fraser breaks through her amnesia to discover and embrace the self she left behind. MY FATHER'S HOUSE is at once a terrible account of a woman's coming of age and a lyric story of love and forgiveness.
It is an autobiography of a Syrian woman’s unusual life and eighty years of experience. Some years were happy, and others were sad. The Syrian society is not widely known, and reading her book, one can get an idea about that country and its society, traditions, and the different religions and sects. I am introducing Syria and my life to the reader.
Known as the "Prince of Preachers," Charles Haddon Spurgeon was among the most prolific and influential pastors of the 19th century. Characterized by profound insights and a passionate call for personal relationships with Christ, Spurgeon's work has stood the tests of time. Beloved even today, Spurgeon's sermons offer you the opportunity to grow in your own faith in a conveniently digital format, designed for your busy life on the go! Updated into modern language, with helpful explanatory footnotes, the text has been carefully proofed to ensure the highest quality and accuracy. Brought to you by the editors who translated the landmark work, Annals of the World, this first series of digital releases from the Spurgeon sermon collection is for the years 1855 and 1856 in one convenient digital file at an unbeatable price! All sermons are unabridged and include references to make it convenient for you to extend your Spurgeon studies. Easy to read and hard to forget, these are sermons of substance that will impact your life today!
In the final days of World War II, Koreans were determined to take back control of their country from the Japanese and end the suffering caused by the Japanese occupation. As an eleven-year-old girl living with her Japanese family in northern Korea, Yoko is suddenly fleeing for her life with her mother and older sister, Ko, trying to escape to Japan, a country Yoko hardly knows. Their journey is terrifying—and remarkable. It's a true story of courage and survival that highlights the plight of individual people in wartime. In the midst of suffering, acts of kindness, as exemplified by a family of Koreans who risk their own lives to help Yoko's brother, are inspiring reminders of the strength and resilience of the human spirit.
Homesickness today is dismissed as a sign of immaturity, what children feel at summer camp, but in the nineteenth century it was recognized as a powerful emotion. When gold miners in California heard the tune "Home, Sweet Home," they sobbed. When Civil War soldiers became homesick, army doctors sent them home, lest they die. Such images don't fit with our national mythology, which celebrates the restless individualism of colonists, explorers, pioneers, soldiers, and immigrants who supposedly left home and never looked back. Using letters, diaries, memoirs, medical records, and psychological studies, this wide-ranging book uncovers the profound pain felt by Americans on the move from the country's founding until the present day. Susan Matt shows how colonists in Jamestown longed for and often returned to England, African Americans during the Great Migration yearned for their Southern homes, and immigrants nursed memories of Sicily and Guadalajara and, even after years in America, frequently traveled home. These iconic symbols of the undaunted, forward-looking American spirit were often homesick, hesitant, and reluctant voyagers. National ideology and modern psychology obscure this truth, portraying movement as easy, but in fact Americans had to learn how to leave home, learn to be individualists. Even today, in a global society that prizes movement and that condemns homesickness as a childish emotion, colleges counsel young adults and their families on how to manage the transition away from home, suburbanites pine for their old neighborhoods, and companies take seriously the emotional toll borne by relocated executives and road warriors. In the age of helicopter parents and boomerang kids, and the new social networks that sustain connections across the miles, Americans continue to assert the significance of home ties. By highlighting how Americans reacted to moving farther and farther from their roots, Homesickness: An American History revises long-held assumptions about home, mobility, and our national identity.
Jesus said in John 10:11, The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly. I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for his sheep. He came to give us freedom from fear, debt, sickness, poverty, homelessness, unemployment, and anything that may prevents us from walking in the light of Gods Word. Now, whether you are a Sunday Church folk, a new believer or a longtime Christian who wants to read the message of faith, I Must Tell Jesus,will prove to you that no one has ever spoke the way that Jesus did. The Story of Jesus must be shared with every person on the face of the earth in order that each individual may have the opportunity to come to believe and follow Jesus. Christ tells us, as He told His disciples, you will be my witnesses in Jerusalelm, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). In order to fulfill Christs command, I Must Tell Jesus is written as a tribute to my family and the family of God. Thank You!
Discover what happens when "The Sopranos' meet "Dynasty" and "Sugar Hill." You get "Behind Closed Doors... In My Father's House."This sizzling novel begins at the conclusion of "Simon Says," and takes the reader on a thrilling journey of the misadventures of the four privileged Cavanaugh siblings: Conrad, Joseph, Christian and Madison. Each stunningly beautiful, and tragically flawed.When Harry, the family patriarch, falls ill, he has to decide which one of his dysfunctional children to pass the helm of the family business to. Lending to the difficulty of rendering this decision is the fact that the family business is dirty business. They are a Black DC Mafia family, teetering on the brink of phenmenal wealth given the blossoming crack market, and threatening to implode due to family squabbles, treachery and bloodlust.

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