A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information.
Presents a compilation of practical advice and folklore, featuring weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles and other entertaining and useful information, all in an attractive layout with dozens of full-color pages.
Provides weather predictions for the entire United States and includes such features as the best days for fishing, recipes from the Wild West, and tips for tightwads.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information
"In Chris Fink's debut work of fiction, America's rural core is cracked open to reveal moments of stark beauty and cruelty. Farmer's Almanac-a new Midwestern Gothic-is an imaginary handbook for rural living, as timeless and essential as its namesake. But this is no American pastoral. Fink's vision is more Orwell than Rockwell. Not since Winesburg, Ohio has a book so thoroughly plumbed the Midwestern character. A despairing farmer milks a dead cow, a baseball phenom chooses between the diamond and the dairy barn, and in the back of the school bus, a young girl fights back against her tormentors. Farmer's Almanac reports the new from mythical Odette County, Wisconsin, where the milk prices keep falling, and the forecast is not good." - back cover.
Offers a compilation of facts and folklore on a range of topics, including weather, astronomy, gardening, animals, history, sports, and health.
Volume 3 of The New Farmer's Almanac--360 pages of original agrarian content, essays, cartoons, imagery and historical snippets--harnesses the wisdom of over 120 contributors from our community of new farmers and ranchers. This volume explores the theme of The Commons, drawing from folklore, mathematical projections, empirical, emotional, and geographical observations of theory and praxis. Farmers hold space in many interwoven commons, and possibilities for our shared future would seem to rest on how these intersecting commons are governed--particularly at the juncture of humanity and ecology where we make our workplace. In re-visiting the Almanac format, we assert our version of Americana and equip ourselves for the challenges of rebuilding the food system and restoring a more democratic, more diverse, and more resilient foundation for society. We face a dystopian future, with guaranteed-unpredictable weather, the impending collapse of the fossil fuel economy, endlessly consolidating monopolies, and a country that is, for the first time in our history, majority urban. That's why this Almanac is a utopian publication, one that reminds today's farmers about the foundational concepts of an agrarian democracy--themselves utopian. But we also reject the self-propelling logic of techno-utopia--dependent upon extraction economies and enclosure of common resources. We orient ourselves instead toward the words of Ursula Le Guin, who reminds us that our intent in utopian thinking should not be "reactionary, nor even conservative, but simply subversive. It seems that the utopian imagination is trapped, like capitalism and industrialism and the human population, in a one-way future consisting only of growth." This tidy volume holds a civil, lived testimony from people whose work, lifeworld, and behavior patterns beamingly subvert the normative values of the macro economy called America.
Includes over three hundred recipes that focus on using garden-fresh vegetables, with tips and advice for herb, vegetable, and edible flower gardening.
Contains the introductory pages to the 1757 edition of the Almanac, and many anecdotes and essays.
Presents data concering rice and rice production around the world.
Victorian Britain, with its maritime economy and strong links between government and scientific enterprises, founded an office to collect meteorological statistics in 1854 in an effort to foster a modern science of the weather. But as the office turned to prediction rather than data collection, the fragile science became a public spectacle, with its forecasts open to daily scrutiny in the newspapers. And meteorology came to assume a pivotal role in debates about the responsibility of scientists and the authority of science. Studying meteorology as a means to examine the historical identity of prediction, Katharine Anderson offers here an engrossing account of forecasting that analyzes scientific practice and ideas about evidence, the organization of science in public life, and the articulation of scientific values in Victorian culture. In Predicting the Weather, Anderson grapples with fundamental questions about the function, intelligibility, and boundaries of scientific work while exposing the public expectations that shaped the practice of science during this period. A cogent analysis of the remarkable history of weather forecasting in Victorian Britain, Predicting the Weather will be essential reading for scholars interested in the public dimensions of science.
Offers a compilation of facts and folklore on a range of topics, including weather, astronomy, gardening, animals, history, sports, and health.

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