Marks & Spencer is an institution synonymous with quality, reliability, and customer care. But do we associate it with 'fashion'? Drawing on previously unpublished company archives, Fashion for the People considers the company's contribution to British - and, since the 1970s, international - fashion. The author discusses how, from the 1920s, Marks & Spencer brought fashion to the high street, offering well-designed clothing at affordable prices. She examines the unique ways in which the company has democratized fashion, arguing that its pioneering role in the development of new fabrics, the employment of designers as consultants and its marketing and promotional strategies have changed the ways in which we understand and consume fashion. Marks & Spencer is not just a stalwart of the British high street. As this book shows, it has also brought fashion to the masses.
This textbook describes the structure of the industry in the UK and globally, and explains the current problems and strategic responses to global shifts in production. The new edition has been updated throughout to include the lastest available data, and takes account of the acceleration of the decline of manufacturing in the UK since 2002, the rapid expansion of production in China, and the final demise of the system of quota control. Essential subject for students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. An expert guide to a bewilderingly complex industry. No competition. Addresses global issues, the opportunities and threats, with strategies for survival. Author is Editor of International Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management.
A fascinating glimpse into the history, influence, activity and success of a national treasure. 50 short, heavily illustrated stories will cover such diverse topics as technical innovations, democratisation of fashion, the power of advertising (M&S can predict what a high percentage of the population will eat in any given week), the war years, the revolution of mass-produced food, ecommerce, customers, staff and social history (the M&S archive has a bigger collection of utility clothing, for example, than even the V&A).
Established in 1967, Milton Keynes is England's largest new city and one of the fastest-growing urban areas in the UK. It is also a suburban city, genuinely liked and appreciated by most of its citizens. For many reasons, however, Milton Keynes is misunderstood, and its valuable recent lessons are mostly ignored in debates about national urban policy. This book discusses the popular and intellectual prejudices that have distorted understandings of the new city. A city is nothing without its people, of course, so Mark Clapson looks at who has moved to Milton Keynes, and discusses their experiences of settling in. He also confronts the common myth of the new city's soullessness with an account of community and association that emphasizes the strength of social interaction there.
"During the Victorian period, England changed from being a predominantly rural to an increasingly urban and suburban society. Clothing and Landscape in Victorian England explores visual and literary representations of clothing in the context of these rapid changes in Victorian life and landscape. Rachel Worth traces how 'traditional' styles of dress -- like men's smock-frocks or women's sun-bonnets -- came to be replaced by 'fashion'. She draws comparisons between different depictions of clothing by artists as diverse as Helen Allingham and George Clausen, as well as by photographers like Henry Peach Robinson and Peter Henry Emerson. She also examines literary accounts of rural life and rural dress, ranging from parliamentary commissions to autobiographies and the novels and poetry of Thomas Hardy. She situates these representations in relation to the particular pattern of survival and collection by museums of garments of rural provenance. Examining the clothing of the rural working classes and its representation in this way, this book illuminates wider social and cultural aspects of society, including rural poverty and changing male and female work patterns, depopulation of the countryside and associated urbanization. It also firmly establishes the importance of clothing as a reference point that enhances our understanding of the social history of the Victorian period"--
This Reader brings together a wide range of material to present an international perspective on topical issues in history of education today. Focusing on the enduring trends in this field, this lively and informative Reader provides broad coverage of the subject and includes crucial topics such as: * higher education * informal agencies of education * schooling, the state and local government * education and social change and inequality * curriculum * teachers and pupils * education, work and the economy * education and national identity. With an emphasis on contemporary pieces that deal with issues relevant to the immediate real world, this book represents the research and views of some of the most respected authors in the field today. Gary McCulloch also includes a specially written introduction which provides a much-needed context to the role of history in the current educational climate. Students of history and history of education will find this Reader an important route map to further reading and understanding.
Taking a global, multicultural, social, and economic perspective, this work explores the diverse and colourful history of human attire. From prehistoric times to the age of globalization, articles cover the evolution of clothing utility, style, production, and commerce, including accessories (shoes, hats, gloves, handbags, and jewellery) for men, women, and children. Dress for different climates, occupations, recreational activities, religious observances, rites of passages, and other human needs and purposes - from hunting and warfare to sports and space exploration - are examined in depth and detail. Fashion and design trends in diverse historical periods, regions and countries, and social and ethnic groups constitute a major area of coverage, as does the evolution of materials (from animal fur to textiles to synthetic fabrics) and production methods (from sewing and weaving to industrial manufacturing and computer-aided design). Dress as a reflection of social status, intellectual and artistic trends, economic conditions, cultural exchange, and modern media marketing are recurring themes. Influential figures and institutions in fashion design, industry and manufacturing, retail sales, production technologies, and related fields are also covered.
Through the Looking Glass, takes a new look at the history of dress. With many contemporary illustrations, this book throws new light on the fashion industry.
A comprehensive analysis of Second World War dress practice and appearance, this study places dress at the forefront of a complex series of cultural chain reactions. As lives were changed by the conditions of war, dress continued to reflect important visual narratives regarding class, gender and taste that would impact significantly on public consciousness of equality, fairness and morale. Using new archival and primary source evidence, Wartime Fashion clarifies how and why clothing was rationed, and repositions style and design during the war in relation to past expectations and ideas about clothes and fabrics. The book explores the impact of war on the dress and appearance of civilian women of all classes in the context of changing social and economic infrastructures created by the national emergency. The varied research elements combined in this book form a rounded and definitive account of the dress history of British women during the Second World War. This is essential reading for anyone with an active interest in the field, whether personal or professional.
When Mark Spencer and his family moved into the beautiful old Allen House in Monticello, Arkansas, they were aware of its notorious reputation for being haunted. According to local lore, the troubled spirit of society belle Ladell Allen, who had mysteriously committed suicide in the master bedroom in 1948, still roamed the grand historic mansion. Yet, Mark remained skeptical—until he and his family began encountering faceless phantoms, a doppelganger spirit, and other paranormal phenomena. Ensuing ghost investigations offered convincing evidence that six spirits, including Ladell, inhabited their home. But the most shocking event occurred the day Mark followed a strange urge to explore the attic and found, crammed under a floorboard, secret love letters that touchingly depict Ladell Allen’s forbidden, heart-searing romance—and shed light on her tragic end. This haunting true ghost story includes several photographs of the Allen House.
National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal. By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troubling consequences of the American wilderness ideal. The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one of the most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.
"The courageous Robert Spencer busts myths and tells truths about jihadists that no one else will tell." -- Michelle Malkin, bestselling author and columnist While many choose to simply blame the West for provoking terrorists, Robert Spencer’s new book The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)™ reveals why it is time to ignore political correctness and identify the enemy, if we hope to ever defeat them. In a fast-paced, politically incorrect tour of Islamic teachings and Crusades history, Spencer reveals the roots of Islamic violence and hatred. Spencer refutes the myths popularized by left-wing academics and Islamic apologists who justify their political agendas with contrived historical “facts.” Exposing myth after myth, The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)™ tackles Islam’s institutionalized mistreatment of non-Muslims, the stifling effect Islam has on science and free inquiry, the ghastly lure of Islam’s X-rated Paradise for suicide bombers and jihad terrorists, the brutal Islamic conquests of the Christian lands of the Middle East and North Africa, and more. In The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades)™, you will learn: How Muhammad did not teach “peace and tolerance”—instead he led armies and ordered the assassination of his enemies Why American Muslim groups and left-wing academics are engaged in a huge cover-up of Islamic doctrine and historyHow today’s jihad terrorists following the Qur’an’s command to make war on Jews and Christians have the same motives and goals as the Muslims who fought the Crusaders Why the Crusades were not acts of unprovoked aggression by Europe against the Islamic world, but a delayed response to centuries of Muslim aggression What must be done today—from reading the Qur’an to reclassifying Muslim organizations—in order to defeat jihad terrorists
Drawing on fashion theory and the first-hand accounts of designers, fashion editors and older women, this book offers the first systematic account of the relationship between dress and age.
This remarkable history encompasses not only the achievements of the early inventors and astronomers but also the less frequently recounted stories of the instrument makers and of the actual instruments. A model of unsurpassed, comprehensive scholarship, this volume covers many fields, including professional and amateur astronomy. 196 black-and-white illustrations.

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