CHAPTERS FOR A FATHERLESS GENERATION With honest humor and raw self-revelation, bestselling author Donald Miller tells the story of growing up without a father and openly talks about the issues that befall the fatherless generation. Raw and candid, Miller moves from self-pity and brokenness to hope and strength, highlighting a path for millions who are floundering in an age without positive male role models. Speaking to both men and women who grew up without a father—whether that father was physically absent or just emotionally aloof—this story of longing and ultimate hope will be a source of strength. Single moms and those whose spouses grew up in fatherless homes will find new understanding of those they love as they travel along this literary journey. This is a story of hope and promise. And if you let it, Donald Miller’s journey will be an informal guide to pulling the rotted beams out from our foundations and replacing them with something upon which we can build our lives.
Daughters, Fathers, and the Novel is a provocative study of the father-daughter story--a neglected dimension of the family romance. It has important implications for the history of the novel, for our understanding of key texts in that history, and for theories concerning the representation of gender, family relations, and heterosexuality in Western culture. In the English and American novel, argues Lynda Zwinger, "the good woman" . . . is a father's daughter, . . . constructed to the very particular specifications of an omnipresent and unvoiced paternal desire." Zwinger supports her case with an analysis of both "high-brow" and "low-brow" novels and with ingenious textual analyses of five novels: Clarissa Harlowe, Dombey and Son, Little Women, The Golden Bowl, and The Story of O. In the dominant discourse of Anglo-American culture, the father's daughter provides the cornerstone for the patriarchal edifice of domesticity and the alibi for patriarchal desire. Zwinger's analysis of the sexual politics embodied in the figure of this sentimental daughter raises compelling critical and cultural issues. Zwinger shows how different readings of Clarissa's story form a sentimental composite that makes her available in perpetuity to heterosexual desire. Dombey and Son illuminates the erotic dimension of the sentimental, the titillation always inherent in the spectacle of virtue in distress. Zwinger's analysis of Little Women in the context of Louisa May Alcott's own life-text focuses upon the problems of a daughter trying to write the filial romance. The Golden Bowl deploys the daughter of sentiment as a "cover story" for a feminine version of the Oedipal story, founded on the daughter who can't say yes, but doesn't say no. The Story of O reveals the pornographic dimension in romantic and sentimental love. In her conclusion, Zwinger offers an overview of the nineteenth-century novel, asking what difference it makes when the writer is a daughter. She shows how the daughter's family romance pictures the father as inadequate, ironically requiring the sentimental daughter as a patriarchal prop. She develops a useful concept of hysteria and argues that generic "disorder" and hysterical "intrusions" mark the family romance novels of Jane Austen, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, and George Eliot. And finally, she makes the case that the daughter's choice to stay home is not necessarily an act of simple complicity, for by staying home she comes as close as she can to disrupting the father-daughter romance.
This book examines the changing roles of fathers in the nineteenth century as seen in the lives and fiction of Victorian authors. Fatherhood underwent unprecedented change during this period. The Industrial Revolution moved work out of the home for many men, diminishing contact between fathers and their children. Yet fatherhood continued to be seen as the ultimate expression of masculinity, and being involved with the lives of one’s children was essential to being a good father. Conflicting and frustrating expectations of fathers and the growing disillusionment with other paternal authorities such as church and state yielded memorable portrayals of fathers from the best novelists of the age. The essays in this volume explore how Victorian authors (the Brontës, Dickens, Gaskell, Trollope, Eliot, Hardy, and Elizabeth Sewall and Mary Augusta Ward) responded to these tensions in their lives and in their fiction. The stern Victorian father cliché persisted, but it was countered by imaginative, involved, albeit faulty fathers and surrogate fathers. This volume poses fathering questions that are still relevant today: What does it mean to be a good father? And, with distrust in patriarchal authorities continuing to increase, are there any sources of authority left that one can trust?
An innovative study of two of England’s most popular, controversial, and influential writers, Father and Son breaks new ground in examining the relationship between Kingsley Amis and his son, Martin Amis. Through intertextual readings of their essays and novels, Gavin Keulks examines how the Amises’ work negotiated the boundaries of their personal relationship while claiming territory in the literary debate between mimesis and modernist aesthetics. Theirs was a battle over the nature of reality itself, a twentieth-century realism war conducted by loving family members and rival, antithetical writers. Keulks argues that the Amises’ relationship functioned as a source of literary inspiration and that their work illuminates many of the structural and stylistic shifts that have characterized the British novel since 1950.
Khaled Khalifa ist ein syrischer Autor, der in Damaskus lebt. Hier spricht eine authentische Stimme aus Syrien. Er zählt zu den bedeutendsten arabischen Autoren und schreibt aus seiner Heimat, nicht aus dem Exil, wie viele seiner Kollegen. Die Bücher von Khaled Khalifa sind ins Französische, Italienische, Amerikanische und in viele andere Sprachen übersetzt. Dies ist sein erstes Buch auf Deutsch. Eine Reise durch Syrien der besonderen Art: Die drei Geschwister Fâtima, Hussain und Bulbul transportieren in Hussains Minibus ihren in einem Damaszener Krankenhaus verstorbenen Vater. Sein letzter Wunsch war es, in seinem Heimatdorf bestattet zu werden. Was in früheren Zeiten problemlos zu bewältigen gewesen wäre, wird im Krieg zur fast unlösbaren Aufgabe. Das Land ist durchsetzt von Straßensperren konkurrierender Kampftruppen. Eine Reihe skurriler Hindernisse stehen den Reisenden im Weg: An einem von Islamisten eingerichteten Checkpoint muss eine Religionsprüfung abgelegt werden. Und an einer anderen, von der staatlichen Armee aufgebauten Straßensperre wird sogar der Leichnam für eine Weile inhaftiert, weil sich der Name des Vaters auf einer Liste gesuchter Personen befindet. Während der umständlichen, langen Autofahrt von Damaskus im Süden bis in das väterliche Heimatdorf nördlich von Aleppo hängen die drei Geschwister ihren Gedanken und Erinnerungen an das Familienleben nach. Mit melancholischer Komik beschreibt Khaled Khalifa den Alltag in Syrien und gibt Einblick in die Struktur einer syrischen Familie. Ein wirklich außergewöhnlicher Roadtrip durch ein zerstörtes Land, ein Buch über Kinder und Väter, über aktuelle Verwüstungen und zeitlose Hoffnungen.
From a New York Times–bestselling author, a “gripping and beautifully written” novel of love and family set against the backdrop of Cold War Berlin (Bookpage). Berlin, 1961. Days before the Wall rises, three teenagers from an American school in West Germany travel to the Communist side of the divided city to join a May Day rally. One of them has brought along a flight bag belonging to his father, a US intelligence officer. Before long, the teens are in the custody of the secret East German police, the notorious Stasi. Unbeknownst to them, their parents have unfinished business, reaching back to World War II, which will pull the three friends into the vortex of an international incident. Told through flashbacks by alternating narrators, Secret Father is a novel of missed signals, cloaked motives, false postures, and panicked responses that tragically echo across borders and generations. Like the classic period thrillers of Graham Greene, James Carroll’s politically charged coming-of-age tale provides a “somber and evocative look at some of the most frightening times in one of the most frightening places in the Cold War” (Kirkus Reviews). “Carroll writes with rich, lyrical ease,” raves Publishers Weekly. “His characters are richly drawn, and the pieces of his impeccably paced story fit together with the cool precision of a Mercedes-Benz.”
Best known as the author of the acclaimed novel River of Earth (1940), Alabama native James Still is one of the most critically acclaimed writers of Appalachian literature. This compilation of scholarly essays exploring Stills literary work is the first book-length collection of its kind and features contributions from leading scholars and writers, including Wendell Berry, Fred Chappell, Jim Wayne Miller, Jeff Daniel Marion, Diane Fisher, Dean Cadle, and Hal Crowther.
Being America's favorite heiress is a dirty job...but someone's gotta do it. Lexington Larrabee has never had to work a day in her life. After all, she's the heiress to the multi-billion-dollar Larrabee Media empire. And heiresses are not supposed to work. But then again, they're not supposed to crash brand-new Mercedes convertibles into convenience stores on Sunset Boulevard either. Which is why, on Lexi's eighteenth birthday, her ever-absent, tycoon father decides to take a more proactive approach to her wayward life. Every week for the next year, she will have to take on a different low-wage job if she ever wants to receive her beloved trust fund. But if there's anything worse than working as a maid, a dishwasher, and a fast-food restaurant employee, it's dealing with Luke, the arrogant, albeit moderately attractive, college intern her father has assigned to keep tabs on her. In Jessica Brody's hilarious "comedy of heiress" about family, forgiveness, good intentions, and best of all, second chances, Lexi learns that love can be unconditional, money can be immaterial, and regardless of age, everyone needs a little saving. And although she might have fifty-two reasons to hate her father, she only needs one reason to love him.
In this memoir of fathers and sons, Gregory Martin struggles to reconcile the father he thought he knew with a man who has just survived a suicide attempt; a man who had been having anonymous affairs with men throughout his thirty-nine years of marriage; and who now must begin his life as a gay man. At a tipping point in our national conversation about gender and sexuality, rights and acceptance, Stories for Boys is about a father and a son finding a way to build a new relationship with one another after years of suppression and denial are given air and light. Martin’s memoir is quirky and compelling with its amateur photos and grab-bag social science and literary analyses. Gregory Martin explores the impact his father’s lifelong secrets have upon his life now as a husband and father of two young boys with humor and bracing candor. Stories for Boys is resonant with conflicting emotions and the complexities of family sympathy, and asks the questions: How well do we know the people that we think we know the best? And how much do we have to know in order to keep loving them?
Never-before-revealed secrets of the characters, leading to the creation of the government's covert Fringe Division. In 2008, Peter Bishop is estranged from his father and running shady operations in Southeast Asia. His latest scam lands him in a life-or-death situation involving weird events beyond the ken of modern science. On the run, he finds himself pursued by strange specters of his past... and his future. The Fringe Division is summoned when the unimaginable occurs. Armed with experimental technology, special agent Olivia Dunham, “fringe” scientist Walter Bishop, and his son Peter Bishop investigate cases that lie beyond the realm of possibility.
"Superb novelists deserve first-rate literary analysis. Cynthia Ozick has found such critics... most recently in Elaine Kauvar, whose present work is simultaneously a profound contribution to Ozick interpretation and an astonishingly readable account of the novelist's ideas and artistic manner.... Highly recommended."Â -- Choice "... comprehensive and beautifully written... "Â -- Studies in the Novel "... an indispensible work of scholarship.... Cynthia Ozick's Fiction, in sum, demonstrates an astute and comprehensive grasp of both Ozick's writings and the vast store of writings that influence her... a definitive and indispensible study... "Â -- American Literature "... a rare combination of painstaking scholarship with dazzling critical intelligence and inventiveness." -- Edward Alexander "... Elaine Kauvar's comprehensive and beautifully written study of Cynthia Ozick's fiction should be welcomed as a heroic counter-cultural manifesto, both in what she says and in the elegance with which she says it." -- Congress Monthly Looking beyond the stereotype of Ozick's work as American-Jewish literature, Kauvar illuminates the intricacies of Ozick's texts and explores the dynamics of her creativity. Kauvar provides readings of all of Ozick's fiction from her first published novel, Trust, through The Messiah of Stockholm.
The Dead Father is a gargantuan half-dead, half-alive, part mechanical, wise, vain, powerful being who still has hopes for himself--even while he is being dragged by means of a cable toward a mysterious goal. In this extraordinary novel, marked by the imaginative use of language that influenced a generation of fiction writers, Donald Barthelme offered a glimpse into his fictional universe. As Donald Antrim writes in his introduction, "Reading The Dead Father, one has the sense that its author enjoys an almost complete artistic freedom . . . a permission to reshape, misrepresent, or even ignore the world as we find it . . . Laughing along with its author, we escape anxiety and feel alive."
Gathers seventy stories by Paley, Hannah, Barthelme, Cheever, Updike, Tallent, Carver, Boyle, Williams, Oates, Hemingway, and Malamud
In this “absolutely electrifying” (Jeffrey Deaver) thriller and huge international hit, two people—each shattered by their past—team up to solve a series of killings and abductions that may hint at something far more sinister at play. When a woman is beheaded in a park outside Rome and her six-year-old son goes missing, the police see an easy solution: they arrest the woman’s husband and await his confession. But the chief of Rome’s major crimes unit has doubts. Secretly, he lures to the case two of Italy’s top analytical minds: Deputy Captain Colomba Caselli, a fierce, warrior-like detective still reeling from having survived a bloody catastrophe, and Dante Torre, a man who spent his childhood trapped inside a concrete silo. Fed by the gloved hand of a masked kidnapper who called himself “the Father,” Dante emerged from his ordeal with crippling claustrophobia but, also, with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge and hyperobservant capacities. All evidence suggests that the Father is back and active after being dormant for decades. But when Colomba and Dante begin following the ever-more-bizarre trail of clues, they grasp that what’s really going on is darker than they ever imagined. An “intense, gripping, and entirely unforgettable” (Christopher Reich) thriller with many twists and turns, it’s perfect for fans of Thomas Harris and Jo Nesbo.
From the prize-winning Chilean novelist Antonio Skármeta, author of Il Postino, comes this soulful novella about a son and his estranged father Jacques is a schoolteacher in a small Chilean village, and a French translator for the local paper. He owes his passion for the French language to his Parisian father, Pierre, who, one year before, abruptly returned to France without a word of explanation. Jacques and his mother's sense of abandonment is made more acute by their isolation in this small community where few read or think. While Jacques finds distraction in a crush on his student's older sister, his preoccupation with his father's disappearance continues to haunt him. But there is often more to a story than the torment it causes. This one is about forgiveness and second chances.
Ann Veronica is a New Woman novel, which describes the rebellion of Ann Veronica Stanley, "a young lady of nearly two-and-twenty," against her middle-class father's stern patriarchal rule. The novel dramatizes the contemporary problem of the New Woman. It is set in Victorian era London and environs, except for an Alpine excursion. Ann Veronica offers vignettes of the Women's suffrage movement in Great Britain and features a chapter inspired by the 1908 attempt of suffragettes to storm Parliament. Herbert George Wells (1866-1946), known as H. G. Wells, was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, and social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games.
A young brother and sister try to rehabilitate their father on their own after he slips into a drug-induced coma and then emerges suffering from brain damage, in a novel that addresses the crisis in authority and faith in American families. Original.
"Canadian bookseller Alex Graham is a middle-age widower whose quiet life is turned upside down when his college-age son disappears without any explanation or trace of where he has gone. With minimal resources, the father begins a long journey that takes him for the first time away from his safe and orderly world. As he stumbles across the merest thread of a trail, he follows it in blind desperation, and is led step by step on an odyssey that takes him to fascinating places and sometimes to frightening people and perils. Through the uncertainty and the anguish, the loss and the longing, Graham is pulled into conflicts between nations, as well as the eternal conflict between good and evil. Stretched nearly to the breaking point by the inexplicable suffering he witnesses and experiences, he discovers unexpected sources of strength as he presses onward in the hope of recovering his son--and himself"--Jacket.
A tale of the battles between a father and son by an author whose novels are “robustly intelligent, very funny, and beguilingly humane” (Philip Roth). Cy Riemer is the patriarch of a successful and loving Chicago family. But not all is copacetic in Cy’s world. The scientific newsletter he publishes is foundering financially, his ex-wife still relies on him for money and intimacy, and he can never seem to find the time or the wherewithal to relax. Much of Cy’s stress is caused by the trouble he has with his brilliant and duplicitous son, Jack. With a mixture of humor, grief, and astonishment, Cy becomes our tour guide to the Riemer family’s museum of triumphs and tragedies. A comic and clear-eyed portrait of the quintessential worried father and the son who lives to torture him, A Father’s Words is packed with Richard Stern’s trademark wit, compassion, and insight.

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