CHAPTERS FOR A FATHERLESS GENERATION With honest humor and raw self-revelation, bestselling author Donald Miller tells the story of growing up without a father and openly talks about the issues that befall the fatherless generation. Raw and candid, Miller moves from self-pity and brokenness to hope and strength, highlighting a path for millions who are floundering in an age without positive male role models. Speaking to both men and women who grew up without a father—whether that father was physically absent or just emotionally aloof—this story of longing and ultimate hope will be a source of strength. Single moms and those whose spouses grew up in fatherless homes will find new understanding of those they love as they travel along this literary journey. This is a story of hope and promise. And if you let it, Donald Miller’s journey will be an informal guide to pulling the rotted beams out from our foundations and replacing them with something upon which we can build our lives.
Daughters, Fathers, and the Novel is a provocative study of the father-daughter story--a neglected dimension of the family romance. It has important implications for the history of the novel, for our understanding of key texts in that history, and for theories concerning the representation of gender, family relations, and heterosexuality in Western culture. In the English and American novel, argues Lynda Zwinger, "the good woman" . . . is a father's daughter, . . . constructed to the very particular specifications of an omnipresent and unvoiced paternal desire." Zwinger supports her case with an analysis of both "high-brow" and "low-brow" novels and with ingenious textual analyses of five novels: Clarissa Harlowe, Dombey and Son, Little Women, The Golden Bowl, and The Story of O. In the dominant discourse of Anglo-American culture, the father's daughter provides the cornerstone for the patriarchal edifice of domesticity and the alibi for patriarchal desire. Zwinger's analysis of the sexual politics embodied in the figure of this sentimental daughter raises compelling critical and cultural issues. Zwinger shows how different readings of Clarissa's story form a sentimental composite that makes her available in perpetuity to heterosexual desire. Dombey and Son illuminates the erotic dimension of the sentimental, the titillation always inherent in the spectacle of virtue in distress. Zwinger's analysis of Little Women in the context of Louisa May Alcott's own life-text focuses upon the problems of a daughter trying to write the filial romance. The Golden Bowl deploys the daughter of sentiment as a "cover story" for a feminine version of the Oedipal story, founded on the daughter who can't say yes, but doesn't say no. The Story of O reveals the pornographic dimension in romantic and sentimental love. In her conclusion, Zwinger offers an overview of the nineteenth-century novel, asking what difference it makes when the writer is a daughter. She shows how the daughter's family romance pictures the father as inadequate, ironically requiring the sentimental daughter as a patriarchal prop. She develops a useful concept of hysteria and argues that generic "disorder" and hysterical "intrusions" mark the family romance novels of Jane Austen, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, and George Eliot. And finally, she makes the case that the daughter's choice to stay home is not necessarily an act of simple complicity, for by staying home she comes as close as she can to disrupting the father-daughter romance.
Called home by the news of his mother's heart attack, John Tremont--in his fifties--finds himself trapped in his own middle age, between his college-drop-out son's impatience to live and his father's heartbreaking weariness and inability to cope
A tale of the battles between a father and son by an author whose novels are “robustly intelligent, very funny, and beguilingly humane” (Philip Roth). Cy Riemer is the patriarch of a successful and loving Chicago family. But not all is copacetic in Cy’s world. The scientific newsletter he publishes is foundering financially, his ex-wife still relies on him for money and intimacy, and he can never seem to find the time or the wherewithal to relax. Much of Cy’s stress is caused by the trouble he has with his brilliant and duplicitous son, Jack. With a mixture of humor, grief, and astonishment, Cy becomes our tour guide to the Riemer family’s museum of triumphs and tragedies. A comic and clear-eyed portrait of the quintessential worried father and the son who lives to torture him, A Father’s Words is packed with Richard Stern’s trademark wit, compassion, and insight.
Your name is Daley Amory. Your parents are divorced. Your mother is building a new life; your father seeking solace in the drinks cabinet. At 18-years-old you finally escape his manipulative hold. You build a new life, fall in love, but one day a message reaches you that your father is alone and dying. Will you return to the messy scene of your childhood or embrace the future you have worked so hard to build? Your name is Daley Amory. This is your choice.
Never-before-revealed secrets of the characters, leading to the creation of the government's covert Fringe Division. In 2008, Peter Bishop is estranged from his father and running shady operations in Southeast Asia. His latest scam lands him in a life-or-death situation involving weird events beyond the ken of modern science. On the run, he finds himself pursued by strange specters of his past... and his future. The Fringe Division is summoned when the unimaginable occurs. Armed with experimental technology, special agent Olivia Dunham, “fringe” scientist Walter Bishop, and his son Peter Bishop investigate cases that lie beyond the realm of possibility.
From a New York Times–bestselling author, a “gripping and beautifully written” novel of love and family set against the backdrop of Cold War Berlin (Bookpage). Berlin, 1961. Days before the Wall rises, three teenagers from an American school in West Germany travel to the Communist side of the divided city to join a May Day rally. One of them has brought along a flight bag belonging to his father, a US intelligence officer. Before long, the teens are in the custody of the secret East German police, the notorious Stasi. Unbeknownst to them, their parents have unfinished business, reaching back to World War II, which will pull the three friends into the vortex of an international incident. Told through flashbacks by alternating narrators, Secret Father is a novel of missed signals, cloaked motives, false postures, and panicked responses that tragically echo across borders and generations. Like the classic period thrillers of Graham Greene, James Carroll’s politically charged coming-of-age tale provides a “somber and evocative look at some of the most frightening times in one of the most frightening places in the Cold War” (Kirkus Reviews). “Carroll writes with rich, lyrical ease,” raves Publishers Weekly. “His characters are richly drawn, and the pieces of his impeccably paced story fit together with the cool precision of a Mercedes-Benz.”
A young brother and sister try to rehabilitate their father on their own after he slips into a drug-induced coma and then emerges suffering from brain damage, in a novel that addresses the crisis in authority and faith in American families. Original.
In den USA wird ein Attentat auf den Präsidentschaftskandidaten der USA verübt – und der Verdächtige ist der eigene Sohn. Sprachlos verfolgt der Arzt Paul Allen die Meldung im Fernsehen. Und setzt nun alles daran, die Unschuld seines Sohns Daniel zu beweisen. Geplagt von Vorwürfen, die Erziehung vernachlässigt zu haben, deckt er unglaubliche Ungereimtheiten auf. Immer mehr deutet auf eine Verschwörung hin, bei der sein Sohn das Opfer sein soll. Als Daniel zum Tod verurteilt wird, setzt Allen alles auf eine Karte. Ein intelligenter psychologischer Roman über den Kampf eines Einzelnen gegen staatliche Macht, um Schuld und die Verfehlungen in der Vergangenheit.
This book examines the changing roles of fathers in the nineteenth century as seen in the lives and fiction of Victorian authors. Fatherhood underwent unprecedented change during this period. The Industrial Revolution moved work out of the home for many men, diminishing contact between fathers and their children. Yet fatherhood continued to be seen as the ultimate expression of masculinity, and being involved with the lives of one’s children was essential to being a good father. Conflicting and frustrating expectations of fathers and the growing disillusionment with other paternal authorities such as church and state yielded memorable portrayals of fathers from the best novelists of the age. The essays in this volume explore how Victorian authors (the Brontës, Dickens, Gaskell, Trollope, Eliot, Hardy, and Elizabeth Sewall and Mary Augusta Ward) responded to these tensions in their lives and in their fiction. The stern Victorian father cliché persisted, but it was countered by imaginative, involved, albeit faulty fathers and surrogate fathers. This volume poses fathering questions that are still relevant today: What does it mean to be a good father? And, with distrust in patriarchal authorities continuing to increase, are there any sources of authority left that one can trust?
Dante Torre besitzt eine besondere Gabe. Er kann Menschen lesen. Aber er hat teuer dafür bezahlt. Elf Jahre war er eingesperrt in ein Betonverlies und darauf angewiesen, die kleinste Regung seines Entführers zu deuten. Als Jahre nach seiner Befreiung ein kleiner Junge verschwindet, weiß Dante Torre, dass der Mann, den er Vater nennen musste, dahintersteckt. Doch der Vater gilt längst als tot. Nur Colomba Caselli glaubt Dante. Sie ist jung, gerade vom Dienst suspendiert und hat nichts zu verlieren bei dieser Ermittlung fern von allen Regeln. Dantes Spürsinn bringt die traumatisierte Frau auf eine Fährte: Jahrelang sind unzählige Kinder entführt worden – mit dem Ziel, ihre Erinnerung auszulöschen und sie zu neuen Menschen zu machen. Jetzt wird Colomba Caselli endgültig von ihrer Vergangenheit eingeholt ...
"Canadian bookseller Alex Graham is a middle-age widower whose quiet life is turned upside down when his college-age son disappears without any explanation or trace of where he has gone. With minimal resources, the father begins a long journey that takes him for the first time away from his safe and orderly world. As he stumbles across the merest thread of a trail, he follows it in blind desperation, and is led step by step on an odyssey that takes him to fascinating places and sometimes to frightening people and perils. Through the uncertainty and the anguish, the loss and the longing, Graham is pulled into conflicts between nations, as well as the eternal conflict between good and evil. Stretched nearly to the breaking point by the inexplicable suffering he witnesses and experiences, he discovers unexpected sources of strength as he presses onward in the hope of recovering his son--and himself"--Jacket.
Father and Son tells the story of five days following Glen Davis’s return to the small Mississippi town where he grew up. Five days. In this daring psychological thriller, these are five days you’ll never forget. Convicted and sentenced on a vehicular homicide charge, Glen is the bad seed--the haunted, angry, drunken, and dangerous son of Virgil and Emma Davis. Bobby Blanchard is the sheriff, as different from Glen as can be imagined, but in love with the same woman--the mother of Glen’s illegitimate son. Before he’s been back in town thirty-six hours, Glen has robbed his war-crippled father, bullied and humiliated his younger brother, and rejected his son, David. Bobby finds himself sorting through the mayhem Glen leaves in his wake--a murdered bar owner, a rape, Glen’s terrorized family, and the little boy who needs a father. And, as he gets closer and closer to the murderous Glen, tension builds like a Mississippi thunderstorm about to break loose. This classic face-off of good against evil is told in the clear, unflinching voice that won Larry Brown some of literature’s most prestigious awards. And, reverberating with dark excitement, biblical echoes, and a fast, cinematic pacing, this novel puts a new side of his genius on display--the ability to build suspense to an almost unbearable pitch. Father and Son is the story of a powerfully complex kinship, an exhilarating and heart-stopping story. 1997 Southern Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction
Originally published in Italy in 2014 as Uccidi il padre.
An innovative study of two of England’s most popular, controversial, and influential writers, Father and Son breaks new ground in examining the relationship between Kingsley Amis and his son, Martin Amis. Through intertextual readings of their essays and novels, Gavin Keulks examines how the Amises’ work negotiated the boundaries of their personal relationship while claiming territory in the literary debate between mimesis and modernist aesthetics. Theirs was a battle over the nature of reality itself, a twentieth-century realism war conducted by loving family members and rival, antithetical writers. Keulks argues that the Amises’ relationship functioned as a source of literary inspiration and that their work illuminates many of the structural and stylistic shifts that have characterized the British novel since 1950.
NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE A gripping novel about a young woman being chased by her violent past, and the flawed father forced to come to her rescue Lydia Carson is an accident waiting to happen. Strung out, she's always running from disaster, and more often she's running right into it. Now at seventeen, Lydia has stumbled onto real trouble. Not only has she witnessed a brutal murder perpetrated by her boyfriend, but his minions are out to make sure that she doesn't have a story to tell the police. John Link is a former Hell's Angel, an ex-con, trying to stay clean and sober while running a tattoo parlor from the kitchen of his trailer home. He's also Lydia's long-estranged father, and when both the police and her boyfriend's thugs are hot on Lydia's trail, Link becomes Lydia's only hope. From the highly acclaimed author of Hot Plastic, Blood Father is a gripping novel that confirms Peter Craig's place among the best crime novelists of his generation.
Gathers seventy stories by Paley, Hannah, Barthelme, Cheever, Updike, Tallent, Carver, Boyle, Williams, Oates, Hemingway, and Malamud
Best known as the author of the acclaimed novel River of Earth (1940), Alabama native James Still is one of the most critically acclaimed writers of Appalachian literature. This compilation of scholarly essays exploring Stills literary work is the first book-length collection of its kind and features contributions from leading scholars and writers, including Wendell Berry, Fred Chappell, Jim Wayne Miller, Jeff Daniel Marion, Diane Fisher, Dean Cadle, and Hal Crowther.
Thomas Keneally pulls no punches in this powerful novel about the Catholic Church's attempts to cover up cases of child abuse, and a priest who decides to help its innocent victims' fight to be heard. Expelled from the archdiocese of Sydney as a young priest for his outspoken views on the Vietnam War, Father Frank Docherty returns to Australia in 1996 to speak at a conference on paedophilia within the Catholic Church. He had hoped to spend time with his mother and old friends. Instead, he finds himself caught up in the cases of two people who claim to have been sexually abused by an eminent Sydney cleric - one the son of Docherty's former parishioner, the other a former nun. And the cleric in question is brother to the woman Docherty fell in love with many years before. If the accusations are true, the consequences for many will be devastating, but Docherty has to follow his conscience. In this riveting, profoundly thoughtful novel, Thomas Keneally draws on his own experience as an ex-seminarian to bring alive matters of faith, celibacy, perversion and marriage. Portraying the Catholic Church at a pivotal moment, he shows that its prevarications and cover-ups wreaked terrible damage not only on innocents but on itself, with toxic repercussions to this day.

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