CHAPTERS FOR A FATHERLESS GENERATION With honest humor and raw self-revelation, bestselling author Donald Miller tells the story of growing up without a father and openly talks about the issues that befall the fatherless generation. Raw and candid, Miller moves from self-pity and brokenness to hope and strength, highlighting a path for millions who are floundering in an age without positive male role models. Speaking to both men and women who grew up without a father—whether that father was physically absent or just emotionally aloof—this story of longing and ultimate hope will be a source of strength. Single moms and those whose spouses grew up in fatherless homes will find new understanding of those they love as they travel along this literary journey. This is a story of hope and promise. And if you let it, Donald Miller’s journey will be an informal guide to pulling the rotted beams out from our foundations and replacing them with something upon which we can build our lives.
Donald Miller's dad left when he was very young. From that point onwards, Donald felt different. Different from the other boys in his class; different from the other boys at camp. He discovered that growing up without a father to show him the ropes is hard work. Dads have essential wisdom to impart to their sons, but without one, life seems a whole lot harder. With honest humour and raw self-revelation, bestselling author Donald Miller talks about growing up without a father and discusses the issues that befall the ‘fatherless generation’.
Born in 1884, Frank R. Paul was slated to study for the priesthood; instead, he studied art and architectural and mechanical drafting. The impact of these studies is evident in his brilliant and original science fiction artwork. To say that Frank R. Paul is the father of science fiction illustration art is an understatement. His fertile imagination, amply demonstrated by the paintings and drawings in this book, speak for themselves and his legacy continues to influence the field today. Here, in this compendium, is the very first collection ever published showcasing many of Paul's full color science fiction artwork along with appreciations and critical essays by Sir Arthur C. Clarke and by Stephen Koshak; Jerry Weist and Roger Hill; Sam Moskowitz; Gerry de la Ree; Forrest J. Ackerman; and Frank Wu.
For Anna, the narrator of Bo Caldwell's richly lyrical and vivid first novel, growing up in the magical world of Shanghai in the 1930s and 1940s creates a special bond between her and her father. He is the son of missionaries, a smuggler, and a millionaire who leads a charmed but secretive life. When the family flees to Los Angeles in the face of the Japanese occupation, he chooses to remain, believing his connections and luck will keep him safe. He's wrong. He survives, only to again choose Shanghai over his family during the Second World War. Anna and her father reconnect late in his life, when she finally has a family of her own, but it is only when she discovers his extensive journals that she is able to fully understand him and the reasons for his absences. With the intensity and appeal of When We Were Orphans, also set in Shanghai at the same time, The Distant Land of My Father tells a moving and unforgettable story about a most unusual father-daughter relationship.
In this “absolutely electrifying” (Jeffrey Deaver) thriller and huge international hit, two people—each shattered by their past—team up to solve a series of killings and abductions that may hint at something far more sinister at play. When a woman is beheaded in a park outside Rome and her six-year-old son goes missing, the police see an easy solution: they arrest the woman’s husband and await his confession. But the chief of Rome’s major crimes unit has doubts. Secretly, he lures to the case two of Italy’s top analytical minds: Deputy Captain Colomba Caselli, a fierce, warrior-like detective still reeling from having survived a bloody catastrophe, and Dante Torre, a man who spent his childhood trapped inside a concrete silo. Fed by the gloved hand of a masked kidnapper who called himself “the Father,” Dante emerged from his ordeal with crippling claustrophobia but, also, with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge and hyperobservant capacities. All evidence suggests that the Father is back and active after being dormant for decades. But when Colomba and Dante begin following the ever-more-bizarre trail of clues, they grasp that what’s really going on is darker than they ever imagined. An “intense, gripping, and entirely unforgettable” (Christopher Reich) thriller with many twists and turns, it’s perfect for fans of Thomas Harris and Jo Nesbo.
Good dads are almost as rare as fire-breathing dragons--or at least so it seems. New from the author of the critically acclaimed Blue Like Jazz--and the man who taught him the things his dad never did--comes a gut-wrenching, honest look at growing up without a father.
An anthology of ten short stories explores the complex bonds between fathers and daughters, in a debut fiction collection that includes the title story in which a young woman attends her father's deathbed and reminisces about how they used to dance together. Reprint.
NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE The searing, post-apocalyptic novel about a father and son's fight to survive. A father and his son walk alone through burned America. Nothing moves in the ravaged landscape save the ash on the wind. It is cold enough to crack stones, and when the snow falls it is gray. The sky is dark. Their destination is the coast, although they don't know what, if anything, awaits them there. They have nothing; just a pistol to defend themselves against the lawless bands that stalk the road, the clothes they are wearing, a cart of scavenged food—and each other. The Road is the profoundly moving story of a journey. It boldly imagines a future in which no hope remains, but in which the father and his son, "each the other's world entire," are sustained by love. Awesome in the totality of its vision, it is an unflinching meditation on the worst and the best that we are capable of: ultimate destructiveness, desperate tenacity, and the tenderness that keeps two people alive in the face of total devastation. A New York Times Notable Book One of the Best Books of the Year The Boston Globe, The Christian Science Monitor, The Denver Post, The Kansas City Star, Los Angeles Times, New York, People, Rocky Mountain News, Time, The Village Voice, The Washington Post
Born in Holland after the war, a son grows up an outsider in the midst of his family. Living in isolation among the dunes of coastal Holland, he looks on as his half-caste half-sisters are mocked for their 'blue skin', endures the bizarre and brutal military training his father puts him through, and wonders about the wartime hardships his family suffered but never discusses. Years later, the middle-aged son begins a quest into his family's past in Indonesia, and the origins of his father's strange mix of charm and cruelty. Despite his sisters' denials and his mother's evasiveness, details surface about the incredible endurance of his father, one of the few survivors of torture in the camp. Returning always to the Dutch coast where he spent his childhood, the man comes to a final acceptance of his father and a new understanding of their relationship.
In this powerful novel, #1 New York Times bestselling author Danielle Steel tells the story of two World War II concentration camp survivors, the life they build together, and the son who faces struggles of his own as a first generation American determined to be his own person and achieve success. When U.S. troops occupy Germany, friends Jakob and Emmanuelle are saved from the terrible fate of so many in the camps. With the help of sponsors, they make their way to New York. In order not to be separated, they allow their friendship to blossom into love and marriage, and start a new life on the Lower East Side, working at grueling, poorly paid jobs. Decades later, through talent, faith, fortune, and relentless hard work, Jakob has achieved success in the diamond business, invested in real estate in New York, and shown his son, Max, that America is truly the land of opportunity. Max is a rising star, a graduate of Harvard with friends among the wealthiest, most ambitious families in the world. And while his parents were thrown together by chance, Max chooses a perfect bride to start the perfect American family. An opulent society wedding. A honeymoon in Tahiti. A palatial home in Greenwich. Max’s lavish lifestyle is unimaginable to his cautious old-world father and mother. Max wants to follow his father’s example and make his own fortune. But after the birth of children, and with a failing marriage, he can no longer deny that his wife is not the woman he thought she was. Angry and afraid, Max must do what he has never done before: struggle, persevere, and learn what it means to truly walk in his father’s footsteps, while pursuing his own ideals and setting an example for his children. Moving from the ashes of postwar Europe to the Lower East Side of New York to wealth, success, and unlimited luxury, In His Father’s Footsteps is a stirring tale of three generations of strong, courageous, and loving people who pay their dues to achieve their goals.
It Was September 28, 2004 When The World Of Literature Was Stunned To Have Lost Its Versatile Genius, A Pioneer Of Indian English Fiction, Mulk Raj Anand. After Enjoying 99 Springs Of Life, He Passed Away Quietly, Leaving Behind A Prolific Literary Legacy. He Was Not Only A Writer But Also A Political And Philosophical Thinker And An Active Humanist Dedicated To The Cause Of World Peace And Universal Brotherhood. His Numerous Novels And Stories Form A Fictional Chronicle, A Record Of His Crusade Against The Social, Political, Ethical And Moral Practices Which Result In The Oppression Of The Poor And Down-Trodden And Also Injustice Against Women, The Weaker Segment Of Society. He Was A Progressive Proletariat And Also Stood For The Emancipation Of Women. He Was A Philanthropist, A Humanist And To Some Extent A Feminist. His Fiction Reveals His Faith In Art For Life S Sake And His Social Commitment To Expose The Exploitation Of The Poor, The Ignorant, The Illiterate By The Imperial Masters, The Village Money- Lenders, The Unscrupulous Traders, The Native Rulers, Priests, Tea-Planters And Above All By Traditional Patriarchs. Such A Committed Writer S Work Was Immensely Significant In Bringing A Change In Society.The Present Anthology A Critical Study Of The Socio-Economic Vision Of Anand, Is Just A Tribute To The Great Founder Of Indian English Fiction Who Has Left Us To Meditate And Ponder Over The Significant Social Issues Raised By Him Through His Fiction. The Best Tribute To Such An Artist Would Be To Comprehend His Vision Of Casteless And Classless Society Based On An Egalitarian Creed. It Is A Modest Attempt To Keep His Dream Alive In Today S World. Contributed By Eminent Writers, The Twenty-One Critical Essays, By And Large, Based Upon Extensive Research And Critical Examination Focus Upon His Social Vision And Humanitarian Approach And, Therefore, Would Be Of Tremendous Use To The Students Of English Literature, The Research Scholars In Particular, And The Academic Community In General. The Present Anthology Is Devoted To This Academic Endeavour.
How does a child become a criminal? How does a father lose a son? An epic crime novel reminiscent of The Godfather, Heat and Shantaram, The Father is inspired by the extraordinary true story of three brothers who held Sweden to ransom, committing ten audacious bank robberies over just two years. None had committed a crime before. All were under 22 years old. All of them would be changed forever. In this intoxicating, heartbreaking thriller, the fourth brother, who was not involved in the real robberies, tells of three boys who grew from innocent children to become public enemy number one - and of the man who made them that way.
In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father—a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man—has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey—first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance. Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama's paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama's maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl). From the Trade Paperback edition.
Not Me is a remarkable debut novel that tells the dramatic and surprising stories of two men–father and son–through sixty years of uncertain memory, distorted history, and assumed identity. When Heshel Rosenheim, apparently suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, hands his son, Michael, a box of moldy old journals, an amazing adventure begins–one that takes the reader from the concentration camps of Poland to an improbable love story during the battle for Palestine, from a cancer ward in New Jersey to a hopeless marriage in San Francisco. The journals, which seem to tell the story of Heshel’s life, are so harrowing, so riveting, so passionate, and so perplexing that Michael becomes obsessed with discovering the truth about his father. As Michael struggles to come to grips with his father’s elusive past, a world of complex and disturbing possibilities opens up to him–a world in which an accomplice to genocide may have turned into a virtuous Jew and a young man cannot recall murdering the person he loves most; a world in which truth is fiction and fiction is truth and one man’s terrible–or triumphant–transformation calls history itself into question. Michael must then solve the biggest riddle of all: Who am I? Intense, vivid, funny, and entirely original, Not Me is an unsparing and unforgettable examination of faith, history, identity, and love. From the Hardcover edition.
From one of our greatest living writers, a bold and timely novel about sin cloaked in sacrament, shame that enforces silence, and the courage of one priest who dares to speak truth to power. Sent away from his native Australia to Canada due to his radical preaching against the Vietnam War, apartheid, and other hot button issues, Father Frank Docherty made for himself a satisfying career as a psychologist and monk. When he returns to Australia to lecture on the future of celibacy and the Catholic Church, he is unwittingly pulled into the lives of two people—a young man, via his suicide note, and an ex-nun—both of whom claim to have been sexually abused by a prominent monsignor. As a member of the commission investigating sex abuse within the Church, and as a man of character and conscience, Docherty decides he must confront each party involved and try to bring the matter to the attention of both the Church and the secular authorities. What follows will shake him to the core and call into question many of his own choices. This riveting, profoundly thoughtful novel is “the work of a richly experienced and compassionate writer [with] an understanding of a deeply wounded culture” (Sydney Morning Herald). It is an exploration of what it is to be a person of faith in the modern world, and of the courage it takes to face the truth about an institution you love.
"Mothers everywhere will identify with Lucy Stone and the domestic problems she encounters." —Publishers Weekly When her part-time reporting gig gives Lucy the opportunity to attend a Boston newspaper conference, she looks forward to the vacation from domestic bliss. But upon leaving Tinker's Cove, she quickly discovers that alone time can be kind of. . .lonely. And in between libel workshops and panel discussions, Lucy takes a guilt trip. She feels terrible that she won't be home to help her husband celebrate Father's Day. But when Luther Read—head of a nearly bankrupt newspaper dynasty—suddenly drops dead, Lucy has other things to think about. Murder, for instance. She's not buying the theory that Luther died of an asthma attack. The man just had too many enemies. Always the intrepid snoop, Lucy vows to investigate. But she can't help wondering if her name will end up on a byline—or in an obit. . . "I like Lucy Stone a lot, and so will readers." --Carolyn Hart Leslie Meier writes with sparkle and warmth." --Chicago Sun-Times "A truly American version of the English cozy." --Tulsa World
Now abridged for young people, Flags of Our Fathers is the unforgettable chronicle of perhaps the most famous moment in American military history: the raising of the U. S. flag at Iwo Jima. Here is the true story behind the immortal photograph that has come to symbolize the courage and indomitable will of America. In February 1945, American Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima–and into history. The son of one of the flag raisers has written a powerful account of six very different men who came together in the heroic battle for the Pacific’s most crucial island.

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