New fathers have at least as many questions and worries as new mothers. Will this be the end of my freedom? Will my child replace me in my partner’s heart? What if I turn out as rotten a father as my father was? What does it mean to be a "good father"? "Father’s Milk" provides answers to a myriad of questions that today’s new dads ask themselves. "Conscious fathering" is the phrase Stein and Samu use to describe a new perspective on fathering - hearing and seeing your child and learning from her what is lacking in her upbringing. Instead of preaching how to be a good father in 12 steps, Stein and Samu demonstrate good fathering through stories and practical advice about everyday situations.
Yet another tasteful and superbly written offering from the pen of one of the most talented and erudite writers of our time. With his unique ability, the author delves into the depths of his poor hapless protagonist, a lost and plagued soul drowning in his own miseries. Undermined by his wife and son; driven to distraction by the miserable circumstances over which he appears to have no control, the wretched Isav can endure no more of his depressingly dark existence, and so abandoning all he has known, sets off - without direction - on a desperate journey from place to place looking to regain his status in the world as a man. Father's Milk is another tasteful and superbly written offering from the pen of one of the most erudite and talented modern writers of our time. Of appeal to the most highly discerning of readers, the adventures of Isav as he travels along the unknown highway of life cannot fail to make an unforgettable impact.
From multi-award-winning Neil Gaiman comes a spectacularly silly, mind-bendingly clever, brilliantly bonkers adventure with lip-smackingly gorgeous illustrations by Chris Riddell
Uncertain Mirrors realigns magical realism within a changing critical landscape, from Aristotelian mimesis to Adorno's concept of negative dialectics. In between, the volume traverses a vast theoretical arena, from postmodernism and postcolonialism to Lévinasian philosophy and eco-criticism. The volume opens and closes with dialectical instability, as it recasts the mutability of the term “mimesis” as both a “world-reflecting” and a “world-creating” mechanism. Magical realism, the authors contend, offers another stance of the possible; it also situates the reader at a hybrid aesthetic matrix inextricably linked to postcolonial theory, postmodernism, Bakhtinian theory, and quantum physics. AsUncertain Mirrors explores, magical realist texts partake of modernist exhaustion as much as of postmodernist replenishment, yet they stem from a different “location of culture” and “direction of culture;” they offer complex aesthetic artifacts that, in their recreation of alternative geographic and semiotic spaces, dislocate hegemonic texts and ideologies. Their unrealistic excess effects a breach in the totalized unity represented by 19th century realism, and plays the dissonant chord of the particular and the non-identical.
Uncertain Mirrors realigns magical realism within a changing critical landscape, from Aristotelian mimesis to Adorno's concept of negative dialectics. In between, the volume traverses a vast theoretical arena, from postmodernism and postcolonialism to Lévinasian philosophy and eco-criticism. The volume opens and closes with dialectical instability, as it recasts the mutability of the term “mimesis” as both a “world-reflecting” and a “world-creating” mechanism. Magical realism, the authors contend, offers another stance of the possible; it also situates the reader at a hybrid aesthetic matrix inextricably linked to postcolonial theory, postmodernism, Bakhtinian theory, and quantum physics. AsUncertain Mirrors explores, magical realist texts partake of modernist exhaustion as much as of postmodernist replenishment, yet they stem from a different “location of culture” and “direction of culture;” they offer complex aesthetic artifacts that, in their recreation of alternative geographic and semiotic spaces, dislocate hegemonic texts and ideologies. Their unrealistic excess effects a breach in the totalized unity represented by 19th century realism, and plays the dissonant chord of the particular and the non-identical.
Now a 5-Part Limited Event Series on Showtime, Starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Blythe Danner Man Booker–shortlisted Mother's Milk, the fourth installment in Edward St. Aubyn's wonderful, wry, and profound Patrick Melrose Cycle, sees Patrick as a lawyer, married, with a five-year-old child and another on the way. The novel shifts points of view from Patrick—furious over his mother's decision to sell their mansion in the South of France to a ridiculous New Age hippie—to Patrick's wife, overburdened by motherhood, to Patrick's mother, growing senile and despondent, and even to Patrick's young son Robert, who reflects with hilarious and disturbing clarity on the moments of his birth.
The Hidden Manna has become a classic on Eucharistic teaching. Now in a second edition, accompanied by a new introduction by Fr. Kenneth Baker, a new preface from the author, new material from John Paul II, and the original foreword by Cardinal John O'Connor, this in-depth study lets the breadth and richness of the Church's Tradition speak for itself. Fr. O'Connor presents and comments on substantial excerpts from the major sources of the Church's Tradition extending all the way back to apostolic times. Focusing on the doctrine of the Real Presence, he follows the earliest witnesses through the challenge in the Middle Ages of Berengarius through the Protestant Reformation and modern disputes.
Based on a true story, Brooke Nolan is a battered child who makes an anonymous phone call about the escalating brutality in her home. When Social Services jeopardize her safety, condemning her to keep her father's secret, it's a glass of spilled milk at the dinner table that forces her to speak about the cruelty she's been hiding. In her pursuit for safety and justice Brooke battles a broken system that pushes to keep her father in the home. When jury members and a love interest congregate to inspire her to fight, she risks losing the support of family and comes to the realization that some people simply do not want to be saved. "Beautifully written, hauntingly real, Spilled Milk is a must read for any young adult today." - F.P Lione, Author
This book is based on an extensive field work in which the author tried to study the customary law of property of an African agrarian tribal community of Ama - also known as Nyima? - of the Nuba Mountains in the northern Sudan. The writer has tried to explain the nature of property holding in the light of the people’s philosophy evidenced in their social structure and their traditional beliefs. Special attention is paid to the traditional structure of political leadership in this highly segmented society that was prone not only to inter-tribal wars but was also in a constant ‘fission and fusion’ among themselves when not at war with other neighboring tribes. In discussing jurisdictional issues, and traditional settlement mechanisms based partly on law and custom, both adopted by this egalitarian society, the study is made currently relevant by keen observation on the effect of modernity on traditional ethics and morality of the Ama society that was once described by some authors as being ‘impervious to foreign influence”. Furthermore, the reception and assimilation of the state law together with the Shari’ah laws in various areas such as that relating to property devolution, family institution, and burial rites is treated as being of great significance in the overall development of the tribal customary laws. Like any other Nuba tribe, the consciousness of the Ama people of their ethos of identity marks their ferociously guarded customs and traditions prevalent up-to-date. The book is not only a precious academic endeavor full of keen observations, in depth study and analysis of tribal customary laws of property; but is also a memoir for the author to commemorate formidable tribal group of the Ama people in the Nuba Mountains of the Sudan.
The Colour of Milk is a literary tour de force of power, class, and fate, told in the fierce, urgent voice of the irrepressible Mary, a character as indelible as The Color Purple’s Celie and Margaret Atwood’s eponymous Alias Grace. Set in England in 1830, The Colour of Milk by Nell Leyshon is an emotionally haunting work of historical fiction — hailed as “charming, Brontë-esque...and hard to forget” (Marian Keyes) — about an illiterate farm girl’s emotional and intellectual awakening and its devastating consequences. Mary, the spirited youngest daughter of an angry, violent man, is sent to work for the local vicar and his invalid wife. Her strange new surroundings offer unsettling challenges, including the vicar’s lecherous son and a manipulative fellow servant. But life in the vicarage also offers unexpected joys, as the curious young girl learns to read and write — knowledge that will come at a tragic price.
The Great Plains are as rich and integral a part of American literature as they are of the North American landscape. In this volume the stories, poems, and essays that have described, celebrated, and defined the region evoke the world of the American prairie from the first recorded days of Native history to the realities of life on a present-day reservation, from the arrival of European explorers to the experience of early settlers, from the splendor of the vast and rolling grasslands to the devastation of the Dust Bowl. Several essays look to the future and explore changes that would embolden the people of the Plains to continue to call home this place they have learned to value in spite of its persistent challenges. ø The infinite variety of the Great Plains landscape and its people unfolds in works by writers as diverse as Willa Cather, Loren Eiseley, Louise Erdrich (Ojibwe), Diane Glancy (Cherokee), Langston Hughes, Wes Jackson, Garrison Keillor, William Least Heat-Moon, Kathleen Norris, Wright Morris, Francis Parkman, O. E. R”lvaag, Mari Sandoz, William Stafford, Mark Twain, Douglas Unger, James Welch (Blackfeet), and Canadians Sharon Butala and Sinclair Ross. From tribal histories to the impressions of travelers today, from tales of isolation and nature?s furious storms to accounts of efforts to build communities, from flights of fancy to nuanced observations of the ecology of the grasslands, this comprehensive volume provides a history of the intricate relationships of land and people in the Great Plains.
The highly anticipated complement to the New York Times bestselling Momofuku cookbook, Momofuku Milk Bar reveals the recipes for the innovative, addictive cookies, pies, cakes, ice creams, and more from the wildly popular Milk Bar bakery. Momofuku Milk Bar shares the recipes for Christina Tosi’s fantastic desserts—the now-legendary riffs on childhood flavors and down-home classics (all essentially derived from ten mother recipes)—along with the compelling narrative of the unlikely beginnings of this quirky bakery’s success. It all started one day when Momofuku founder David Chang asked Christina to make a dessert for dinner that night. Just like that, the pastry program at Momofuku began. Christina’s playful desserts, including the compost cookie, a chunky chocolate-chip cookie studded with crunchy salty pretzels and coffee grounds; the crack pie, a sugary-buttery confection as craveable as the name implies; the cereal milk ice cream, made from everyone’s favorite part of a nutritious breakfast—the milk at the bottom of a bowl of cereal; and the easy layer cakes that forgo fancy frosting in favor of unfinished edges that hint at the yumminess inside helped the restaurants earn praise from the New York Times and the Michelin Guide and led to the opening of Milk Bar, which now draws fans from around the country and the world. With all the recipes for the bakery’s most beloved desserts—along with ones for savory baked goods that take a page from Chang’s Asian-flavored cuisine, such as Kimchi Croissants with Blue Cheese—and 100 color photographs, Momofuku Milk Bar makes baking irresistible off-beat treats at home both foolproof and fun.
A fascinating discussion of the kabbalistic image of a nursing god, its historical context, and its theological implications.
Veteran San Francisco private eye Dan Kasdan manages to find and then lose Pricilla, the love of his life, several times over the course of thiry years, always competing with his criminal counterpart, Karim
Great British Sweets is a gloriously indulgent celebration of our Great British love affair with sweet-making and good old-fashioned confectionery. The perfect gift for Valentines, birthdays and mums! From pear drops to humbugs, honeycomb confections to liquorice, coconut ice to sugar mice, Nozedar gives us the rich history of these classic sweets along with over 50 easy-to-follow recipes for how to make them at home. Make your own Macaroon Bars. Have a go at homemade Humbugs. Create a giant Curly Wurly bar. Or rustle up some lovely Liquorice.
Bo Mason, his wife, Elsa, and their two boys live a transient life of poverty and despair. Drifting from town to town and from state to state, the violent, ruthless Bo seeks out his fortune—in the hotel business, in new farmland, and, eventually, in illegal rum-running through the treacherous back roads of the American Northwest. Stegner portrays more than thirty years in the life of the Mason family in this masterful, harrwoing saga of people trying to survive during the lean years of the early twentieth century.
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, Hot Milk moves "gracefully among pathos, danger, and humor†? (The New York Times). I have been sleuthing my mother's symptoms for as long as I can remember. If I see myself as an unwilling detective with a desire for justice, is her illness an unsolved crime? If so, who is the villain and who is the victim? Sofia, a young anthropologist, has spent much of her life trying to solve the mystery of her mother's unexplainable illness. She is frustrated with Rose and her constant complaints, but utterly relieved to be called to abandon her own disappointing fledgling adult life. She and her mother travel to the searing, arid coast of southern Spain to see a famous consultant--their very last chance--in the hope that he might cure her unpredictable limb paralysis. But Dr. Gomez has strange methods that seem to have little to do with physical medicine, and as the treatment progresses, Sofia's mother's illness becomes increasingly baffling. Sofia's role as detective--tracking her mother's symptoms in an attempt to find the secret motivation for her pain--deepens as she discovers her own desires in this transient desert community. Hot Milk is a profound exploration of the sting of sexuality, of unspoken female rage, of myth and modernity, the lure of hypochondria and big pharma, and, above all, the value of experimenting with life; of being curious, bewildered, and vitally alive to the world.

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