There are lots of books about parenthood. But if you look closely most of them are about motherhood. Fathers get brief paragraphs about needing the odd cuddle themselves and being helpful for carrying the heavier elements of baby kit, but that's it. Fatherhood - The Truth, on the other hand, is a shed-friendly man's guide to the whole scary, life-changing business. One that looks beyond the happy-clappy cliches into the fiery hell of night feeds and projectile vomiting. 'Shit happens' will suddenly start to make sense as a phrase. Providing crucial information and insight on every aspect of parenting with pitch-perfect humour, it takes the dad-to-be on a white-knuckle ride from conception to the first birthday that also considers the emotional truths and selfish imperatives that fathers are usually asked to bury out of sight. A personally informed journey, Fatherhood - The Truth also touches all the crucial practical bases to make it a one-stop, know-it-all manual for the father-to-be.
Beloved NBA player, poet, youth advocate, and devoted dad Etan Thomas speaks from his heart on what matters most in his life: being there for his children. As a participant in President Obama's Fatherhood Initiative, Etan has reached out to young men (often young fathers) in the juvenile detention system and in local communities. He knows firsthand the difference having a father in your life can make. Now he brings together a chorus of voices--athletes and coaches, performers, politicians and leaders of faith--to weigh in on the importance of being a father today. Isaiah Washington, Howard Dean, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Taye Diggs, Malcolm-Jamal Warner, Tony Hawk, Al Sharpton, Chuck D, and many more share what they've learned from being a father, having a father, or in some cases not having a father around. By taking an active role as fathers, men not only find their own lives more joyful and fulfilling--they pass on to the next generation a legacy of love, wisdom, responsibility, and strength.--From publisher description.
In this new book, Parke considers the father-child relationship within the "family system" and the wider society. Using the "life course" view of fathers, he demonstrates that men enact their fatherhood in a variety of ways in response to their particular social and cultural circumstances.
Explores the scientific side of fatherhood, revealing that it alters a man's sexuality, rewires his brain, and changes his hormonal profile.
The New York Times bestseller: “Hilarious. No mushy tribute to the joys of fatherhood, Lewis’ book addresses the good, the bad, and the merely baffling about having kids.”—Boston Globe When Michael Lewis became a father, he decided to keep a written record of what actually happened immediately after the birth of each of his three children. This book is that record. But it is also something else: maybe the funniest, most unsparing account of ordinary daily household life ever recorded, from the point of view of the man inside. The remarkable thing about this story isn’t that Lewis is so unusual. It’s that he is so typical. The only wonder is that his wife has allowed him to publish it.
Lyrical, suspenseful short fiction from an Edgar Award–winning author: “Thomas Cook has long been one of my favorite writers” (Harlan Coben). Over his acclaimed career, Cook’s novels have haunted, riveted, and spellbound readers across the world, and his short stories are equally acclaimed. They range from the intensely focused world of “Fatherhood,” the Herodotus Award–winning title story, to the Edgar-nominated “Rain,” a dark, kaleidoscopic tale of Manhattan on a single, rain-swept night. “The Fix,” the story of a famous boxing fix that was, well, not a fix at all, was selected for inclusion in Best Mystery Stories of the Year. “What She Offered,” the gripping tale of a one-night stand, was included in the Best Noir Stories of the Century. Like Cook’s novels, the range of this collection is, itself, astonishing. From a backwoods Appalachian shack during the Depression (“Poor People”) to a Midwestern college campus in the throes of sixties revolt (“The Sun-Gazer”) to a midtown Manhattan bookstore on Christmas Eve (“The Lessons of the Season”), this collection demonstrates precisely that, in the words of Michael Connolly, “no one tells a story better than Thomas H. Cook.”
"When "Big Mike" Cummings asked Jorja Leap to co-lead a group for men learning how to father their children, she had no idea what to expect. What unfolds in these pages is the story of Project Fatherhood and its members as they meet every Wednesday night in Watts- the epicenter of violence in Los Angeles. The struggles the book illuminates are heartbreaking, infuriating and hilarious. Over time, the fathers both support and argue with one another about the best strategies for raising children and dealing with "significant others." Their family relationships are freighted with joy and uncertainty. But the story moves into deeper territory as the men confront long-term loss and trauma, the chronic pressure of poverty and the unquenchable desire to somehow do better and provide more for the next generation." --
An indispensable survival manual for guys entering the trenches of fatherhood, Be Prepared is loaded with one-of-a-kind insights, MacGyver-esque tips and tricks, and no-nonsense advice for mastering the first year as a dad. Finally, a book that teaches men all the things they really need to know about fatherhood...including how to: -Change a baby at a packed sports stadium -Create a decoy drawer full of old wallets, remote controls, and cell phones to throw baby off the scent of your real gear -Stay awake (or at least upright) at work -Babyproof a hotel room in four minutes flat -Construct an emergency diaper out of a towel, a sock, and duct tape Packed with helpful diagrams and detailed instructions, and delivered with a wry sense of humor, Be Prepared is the ultimate guide for sleep-deprived, applesauce-covered fathers everywhere.
"The day my daughter Marley was born, I went straight to the nursery and held her for well over two hours. I just held her and cried because I had never experienced such a love for anyone or anything in my life. I think the nurses thought I was crazy because eventually they told me I needed to go be with my wife. Three days later, before we left the hospital, the pediatric doctor told us she thought Marley might have Down syndrome. My reaction: Are you freaking kidding me? I immediately had a panic attack." Thus begins the brutally honest account of a new father who struggles with his faith, his family, and mostly himself as he comes to grips with the prospect of raising a child with a disability. The author, Jack Barr, does not hold anything back as he shares his questions and his pain. Through a process of understanding, love, prayer, faith, and support from others, the author's perspective changes and he comes to realize the beautiful blessing that has been given to him and the privilege it is to be a father. "Failing at Fatherhood" is indeed a book for the imperfect father and it will help any parent who may be struggling through a crisis of faith. By sharing Jack's story, one will grow in their perspective on life and God so that they may better understand their own role as a parent and spouse.
This book traces changes in what it means to be a dad in America, from the 1960s through today. Beginning with an overview of fatherhood in America from the “founding fathers” through the 1950s, the book progresses to the role of fathers as they were encouraged to move beyond being simply providers to becoming more engaged parents.
Compelling stories of fatherhood from the popular NPR radio show From the popular radio series This I Believe comes this touching and thought-provoking compilation of original essays on one of the most fundamental of human relationships-fatherhood. It is a relationship filled with joy and heartbreak, love and anger, lessons learned, and opportunities missed. The stories in this collection are engaging and meaningful. Some are reverential and loving; some are sad and clouded by yearning, loss, and regret: You'll read reflections from expectant and new dads, full of optimism, as well as from longtime parents who, through the distance of time, are able to reflect on their successes and failures as fathers. We also hear from children (some young and some well into adulthood) writing about their fathers. They honestly and openly introduce us to the men who shaped them, sometimes in surprising ways. They talk about the fathers they want to emulate, the mistakes they hope to avoid repeating, and the wisdom they realized they've gained. This I Believe: On Fatherhood offers a compelling portrait of the diverse range of experiences and beliefs related to the father-child relationship. With personal insights and inspiration, this collection makes a wonderful gift for long-time fathers, new fathers, and fathers-to-be.
The period between World War I and World War II was an important time in the history of gender relations, and of American fatherhood. Revealing the surprising extent to which some of yesterday's fathers were involved with their children, The Modernization of Fatherhood recounts how fatherhood was reshaped during the Machine Age into the configuration we know today. LaRossa explains that during the interwar period the image of the father as economic provider, pal, and male role model, all in one, became institutionalized. Using personal letters and popular magazine and newspaper sources, he explores how the social and economic conditions of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression—a period of technical innovation as well as economic hardship—fused these expectations into a cultural ideal. With chapters on the U.S. Children's Bureau, the fathercraft movement, the magazine industry and the development of Parent's Magazine, and the creation of Father's Day, this book is a major addition to the growing literature on masculinity and fatherhood.
Examines the shifting paradigm of unmarried fatherhood in inner cities in the United States, citing how economic and cultural changes have transformed the meaning of fatherhood among the urban poor.
Let me guess: your Facebook page is littered with baby studies and you're hearing "Having a baby changes everything" more often than "Having a baby is pure joy." The sad fact is that pregnancy has been turned into a cataclysmic medical emergency and parenthood's become an obstacle course of optimization. Music journalist Chris Kornelis has no patience for any of it. He didn't know the first thing about pregnancy when his wife gave him the good news, but he knew that the birth of a child should be a joyous occasion, not a minefield of stress and shame. Rocking Fatherhood provides a week-by-week guide to pregnancy for twenty-first century fathers, but unlike most pregnancy books, it doesn't address every scenario and statistic you and your lady could encounter in the next nine months. Rather, Chris encourages you to make decisions based on what you think is best for your family, not to conform to someone else's definition of ideal. To write the book, he mined his own time as an expectant pop and new dad, but he also solicited wisdom from doctors, scientists, songwriters, and the real rock stars—moms. His entertaining insights include: You don't need a book or birthing course (only a 3x5 card. Babies can't change everything. They can't even change themselves. Pregnancy sex can be great sex. Nobody else knows how they're going to make it work, either. Bottle or breast: you decide what's best.
This book discusses and analyses the ways in which fatherhood is in transition in contemporary and globalized society. The authors identify and examine fathering practices in relation to hegemonic and marginal patterns of masculinity, the concept of heteronormativity and sexuality, and patterns of segregation, class and national differences. Contextualised in relation to theories of fatherhood and relevant statistics, Fatherhood in Transition presents rich empirical material gathered in a number of western countries. It focuses on key themes including transnational fathering and families, gay fathers and the virtual global arena of fatherhood images found on the internet. Containing a number of new discussions about masculinity and fatherhood, whilst contributing to and developing existing debates and theories about men, masculinity, gender and society, this book will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines, including Men’s Studies, Gender Studies, Sociology, Psychology, Media Studies and Cultural Studies.
Hacking Fatherhood is the content rich, 24-month guide for serious dads-to-be. This chronological action plan is loaded with little known insights and superior strategies to become a family hero in the modern age. It's the ultimate manual for guys who are willing to work smarter to achieve elite success. Much more than a collection of easy tips for merely surviving pregnancy, this is the advanced plan for thriving as a new father and family leader. Each section is packed will valuable tactics to fortify your marriage, save your wallet, and transform you into the man you were designed to be. Topics include: Fertility secrets that men have never been told Navigating health insurance like a pro Hacking nutrition and pre-programming your baby's good habits Maintaining peak performance for the entire family Managing pregnancy, one trimester at time How to be a rock star husband and make your marriage stronger than ever How to deal with unexpected complications Preparing for and managing pre-labor, labor, and delivery Hospital hacks to make life easier Establishing superior feeding and sleeping routines to reduce stress How to negotiate medical bills and cut them in half Restarting your life with a new identity From 24 months B.C. (before child) to 1 week A.D. (after delivery), Dr. Nate Dallas will be your step-by-step mentor, ensuring that you get a tremendous start as you step into your new role.
Using an entirely new conceptual vocabulary through which to understand men's experiences and expectations at the dawn of the twenty-first century, this path-breaking volume focuses on fatherhood around the globe, including transformations in fathering, fatherhood, and family life. It includes new work by anthropologists, sociologists, and cultural geographers, working in settings from Peru to India to Vietnam. Each chapter suggests that men are responding to globalization as fathers in creative and unprecedented ways, not only in the West, but also in numerous global locations.
“Magical prose stylist” Michael Chabon (Michiko Kakutani, New York Times) delivers a collection of essays—heartfelt, humorous, insightful, wise—on the meaning of fatherhood. For the September 2016 issue of GQ, Michael Chabon wrote a piece about accompanying his son Abraham Chabon, then thirteen, to Paris Men’s Fashion Week. Possessed with a precocious sense of style, Abe was in his element chatting with designers he idolized and turning a critical eye to the freshest runway looks of the season; Chabon Sr., whose interest in clothing stops at “thrift-shopping for vintage western shirts or Hermès neckties,” sat idly by, staving off yawns and fighting the impulse that the whole thing was a massive waste of time. Despite his own indifference, however, what gradually emerged as Chabon ferried his son to and from fashion shows was a deep respect for his son’s passion. The piece quickly became a viral sensation. With the GQ story as its centerpiece, and featuring six additional essays plus an introduction, Pops illuminates the meaning, magic, and mysteries of fatherhood as only Michael Chabon can.
Explores fatherhood from psychological, genetic, and neuroscience perspectives to challenge misperceptions and demonstrate the profound impact of fathers on children's lives.

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