Arguing that the mother/child bond tells only part of the story of a healthy childhood, a renowned child psychiatrist shows that fathers play an important role in a child's physical, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development.
Explores gender-based parenting and communication styles to reveal how to overcome conflicts and adapt instinct-based techniques in complementary ways, in a guide that offers insight into biological factors while identifying common milestone pitfalls. Original.
I see many examples of how the children have not been made a priority in many African American families. It seems that many African American men are content to produce children and then simply walk away from most, if not all of the financial, emotional and psychological responsibilities that serve as the foundation of parenting. Baby Daddy Disorder is a reality check on what is terribly wrong in the African American community. Families are the core of every issue that plagues our community. Alcoholism, obesity and poor health, economic hardship, education, crime and violence are just a few elements that need improvement within the African American community. Each one of these elements could be tackled more strategically if families were intact or if parents could work together as a team to ensure success for their children. It’s been said that “It takes a village to raise a child.” Even if grandmother, aunts and uncles create and work in the village, father’s need to step up, man up and get up so that they can fulfill their role in the village. Baby Daddy Disorder is a reality check on what is terribly wrong in the African American community. Families are the core of every issue that plagues our community. Alcoholism, obesity and poor health, economic hardship, education, crime and violence are just a few elements that need improvement within the African American community. Each one of these elements could be tackled more strategically if families were intact or if parents could work together as a team to ensure success for their children. It’s been said that “It takes a village to raise a child.” Even if grandmother, aunts and uncles create and work in the village, father’s need to step up, man up and get up so that they can fulfill their role in the village.
Glenn Doman has demonstrated time and time again that very young children are far more capable of learning than we ever imagined. He has taken his remarkable work, work that explores why children from birth to age six learn better and faster than older children do, and given it practical application. As the founder of The Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential, he has created home programs that any parent can follow. How To Multiply Your Baby's Intelligence provides a comprehensive program that shows you just how easy and pleasurable it is to teach your young child how to read, understand mathematics, and expand his or her general learning potential. It explains how to begin and expand this remarkable program, how to make and organize necessary materials, and how to more fully develop your child's learning ability. By following the simple daily program in a relaxed and loving way, you will enable your child to experience the joy of learning, as have millions of children the world over. With How To Multiply Your Baby's Intelligence, you can give your baby a powerful advantage that will last a lifetime.
Cher-ish-ment, n. F. cher, dear. Sweet, indulgent love, esp. of children. Emotional equivalent of nourishment; soul food. What the world needs now. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl and Faith Bethelard give a name to the kind, warm, tender, and affectionate love that babies expect before they can speak of it and that we all desire our whole lives long. As adults, they note, we all desire our whole lives long. As adults, they note, we don't often acknowledge or even understand our need for this "cherishment." Their book is a rare effort to explore that need, to create a "psychology of the heart." In Cherishment, Young-Bruehl and Bethelard provide a wholly original way of thinking about familiar concepts such as love, attachment, and care, showing how deep-seated disappointments and fears of dependency keep so many of us from forming healthy relationships. Questioning the traditional, celebratory view of independence and self-reliance, they argue that cherishment is the emotional foundation, formed in childhood, that sustains all kinds of growth-promoting adult bonds. Blending the philosophical writing that has won Young-Bruehl international acclaim with Bethelard's imaginative sensibility, Cherishment is a finely balanced interplay of scholarship, dual-memoir, and intimate therapeutic tales. It draws on ancient wisdom traditions of the East and West, telling many instructive stories of men and women, young and old, who have learned to cultivate the cherishment instinct in themselves as well as in others. It helps readers attune sensitively to the ways people express their need for affection in the details of daily life and relationships. The book narrates a journey of discovery, and any reader on his or her own journey in the realm of the heart will feel cherished by it.
Caitlin misses her brother every day. Since his death in a school shooting, she has no one to explain the world to her. And for Caitlin, the world is a confusing place. She hates it when colours get mixed up, prefers everything to be black-and-white, and needs to check her Facial Expressions Chart to understand emotions. So when Caitlin reads the definition of “closure”, she decides that’s what she needs. And as she struggles to find it, a world of colour begins to enter her black-and-white life...
I try to see him among a migrating flock--he will take the loneliness of my room on his long journey; each whistling note he makes will be a little of my sadness falling over the ocean, to be swallowed in the clash of waves and the commotion of many birds flying. "Tell me the truth," demands fifteen-year-old Megumi Shimizu as her mother hurriedly packs. But her mother refuses to admit that she is leaving forever--leaving her husband to his mistress, her home to her silent, resentful mother-in-law, her daughter to survive, if she can. Angry at everyone's polite lies, Megumi realizes that she has a secret of her own: Even though she goes to church, to Bible study class, and to the Christian Girls' Academy, she no longer believes in God. Only Dr. Mizutani, the "spinster lady" veterinarian, tells the truth, and she warns that single birds without their mothers often die. In One Bird, a coming-of-age novel about mothers and daughters, about best friends, boyfriends, and families, Kyoko Mori uses folktales, images of birds, and details of bird life to explore the bonds of love that go deeper than lies. As Megumi learns how to care for injured waxwings, crows, sparrows, and one abandoned grosbeak, she begins her own flight toward truth, and toward home.
Why Fathers Count: The Importance of Fathers and Their Involvement with Children (edited by Sean E. Brotherson and Joseph M. White) is an anthology (27 articles) dealing with the most important work men ever do?-being totally involved in the lives of their children and families. It is men's strengths, their capacity to care and protect and give, that are needed by children, women, and men themselves. In a culture that questions the value of men in family life, we need a compelling perspective on what men can contribute to their families and communities and insight on the ways in which fathers and father figures make a meaningful difference. Why Fathers Count offers that insight, giving a fresh and powerful perspective on the meaningful contributions of fathers and father figures to the lives of children and families.
In this landmark biography, Jane Addams becomes America's most admired and most hated woman—and wins the Nobel Peace Prize. Jane Addams (1860-1935) was a leading statesperson in an era when few imagined such possibilities for women. In this fresh interpretation, the first full biography of Addams in nearly forty years, Louise W. Knight shows Addams's boldness, creativity, and tenacity as she sought ways to put the ideals of democracy into action. Starting in Chicago as a co-founder of the nation's first settlement house, Hull House—a community center where people of all classes and ethnicities could gather—Addams became a grassroots organizer and a partner of trade unionists, women, immigrants, and African Americans seeking social justice. In time she emerged as a progressive political force; an advocate for women's suffrage; an advisor to presidents; a co-founder of civil rights organizations, including the NAACP; and a leader for international peace. Written as a fast-paced narrative, Jane Addams traces how one woman worked with others to make a difference in the world.
"Smart, hilarious, unique-- just terrific." --Anne Lamott A thoughtful, witty memoir from the author of How to Be a Person in the World and the popular advice column, Ask Polly. When Heather Havrilesky was a kid during the '70s, harrowing disaster films dominated every movie screen with earthquakes that destroyed huge cities, airplanes that plummeted towards the ground and giant sharks that ripped teenagers to shreds. Between her parents' dramatic clashes and her older siblings' hazing, Heather's home life sometimes mirrored the chaos onscreen. Disaster Preparedness charts how the most humiliating and painful moments in Havrilesky's past forced her to develop a wide range of defense mechanisms, some adaptive, some piteously ill-suited to modern life. From premature boxing lessons to the competitive grooming of cheerleading camp, from her parents' divorce to her father's sudden death, Havrilesky explores a path from innocence and optimism to self-protection and caution, bravely reexamining the injuries that shaped her, the lessons that sunk in along the way, and the insights that carried her through. Disaster Preparedness is a road map to the personal disasters we all face from an irresistible voice that gets straight to the beauty and grace at the heart of every calamity. From the Trade Paperback edition.
An “absorbing . . . beautifully written” debut about the trials of growing up unique in a restrictive environment (The New York Times Book Review). In 1968, in a remote part of Canada, a child is born—a baby who appears to be neither fully boy nor girl, but both at once. Only three people share the secret: the baby’s parents and a trusted neighbor. Together, the adults make the difficult choice of deciding the gender for themselves, and raise the child as a boy named Wayne. But as Wayne grows up, his shadow-self, a girl he thinks of as “Annabel,” is never entirely extinguished, and indeed is secretly nurtured by the women in his life. As Wayne approaches adulthood, and its emotional and physical demands, the woman inside him begins to cry out. The changes that follow are momentous not just for him, but for the three adults who have guarded his secret. Shortlisted for the Orange Prize in Fiction, this “enchanting” literary gem explores the courage to unveil one’s true self in a culture that shuns contradiction (The New Yorker).
A reasoned yet urgent call to embrace and protect the essential, practical human quality that has been drummed out of our lives: wisdom. It's in our nature to want to succeed. It's also human nature to want to do right. But we've lost how to balance the two. How do we get it back? Practical Wisdom can help. "Practical wisdom" is the essential human quality that combines the fruits of our individual experiences with our empathy and intellect-an aim that Aristotle identified millennia ago. It's learning "the right way to do the right thing in a particular circumstance, with a particular person, at a particular time." But we have forgotten how to do this. In Practical Wisdom, Barry Schwartz and Kenneth Sharpe illuminate how to get back in touch with our wisdom: how to identify it, cultivate it, and enact it, and how to make ourselves healthier, wealthier, and wiser.
Sophie is in trouble. She is on probation for stealing and is doing poorly at school. Her mom doesn’t talk to her, and the other adults in her life are pressuring Sophie to talk about her bruises. Sophie worries that if she tells, she will be sent to live in a group home. Her friend Jujube is the only person who knows the truth, and now Jujube, too, wants Sophie to speak up.
A children's book for all ages: After learning of her father's need for prayer, Zuzu falls asleep while repeating, "Please bring Daddy back."In her dream, she embarks on a journey to find her father and heal her wilting rose. While her flower loses petals with each person she meets, she is concerned that her gift is falling apart and will soon be gone. What she finds is that the greatest gift of all is caring for others and that never dies.
The personal story of the former Secretary of State traces her childhood in segregated Alabama, describes the influence of people who shaped her life and pays tribute to her parents' characters and sacrifices. Reprint. A best-selling book.
The fully revised and updated must-have resource to help you become a supportive and assertive advocate for your child In print for more than twenty years, The Misunderstood Child has become the go-to reference guide for families of children with learning disorders. This newly revised edition provides the latest research and new and updated content, including: • How to identify and address specific disabilities, from dyslexia to sensory integration disorder • New information on the genetics of learning disorders • Expanded sections on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) • The most recent neurological discoveries about how the brain functions in children with learning disabilities • Insights about other neurological disorders common among individuals with learning disabilities, such as anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviors, anger-control problems, depression, and tic disorders • Resources, Web sites, and organizations that can aid the treatment process and offer support for both parent and child From the Trade Paperback edition.
Baby sisters can be so annoying! That's what Max thinks. Max needs his daddy's help—right now!—to bake a surprise Passover birthday cake for his mommy. But as baby Trudy fusses instead of napping, and Daddy tries to settle her down, their time to bake is slipping away. With her warm and pithy storytelling, Michelle Edwards captures the moment in a child's life when he realizes that he has the power to do things on his own.
"A powerful novel of tensions–sexual, familial, religious, and political–and an affecting but unsparing portrait of the petit bourgeois world of Egyptian Jews standing obliviously on the edge of a precipice. Alexandria-–sensual and enchanting-–shimmers in these pages." —Dalia Sofer, author of The Septembers of Shiraz "A fine work of art . . . riveting from the first page to the last."—Zo Haderekh "A reason to rejoice. . . . You can't help but keep on smiling with great pleasure."—Maariv "A profound literary experience."—Ahshav Alexandrian Summer is the story of two Jewish families living their frenzied last days in the doomed cosmopolitan social whirl of Alexandria just before fleeing Egypt for Israel in 1951. The conventions of the Egyptian upper-middle class are laid bare in this dazzling novel, which exposes startling sexual hypocrisies and portrays a now vanished polyglot world of horse-racing, seaside promenades, and elegant night clubs. Hamdi-Ali senior is an old-time patriarch with more than a dash of strong Turkish blood. His handsome elder son, a promising horse jockey, can't afford sexual frustration, as it leads him to overeat and imperil his career, but the woman he lusts after won't let him get beyond undoing a few buttons. Victor, the younger son, takes his pleasure with other boys. But the true heroine of the story—richly evoked in a pungent upstairs/downstairs mix—is the raucous, seductive city of Alexandria itself. Published in Hebrew in 1978, Alexandrian Summer appears now in translation for the first time. Yitzhak Gormezano Goren was born in Alexandria, Egypt, in 1941 and immigrated to Israel as a child. A playwright and novelist, Goren studied English and French literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv University. In 1982, he cofounded the Bimat Kedem Theater.
"A completely revised and updated second edition of one of the most popular and bestselling parenting books of all time, by America's favorite pediatrician, Dr. Harvey Karp. Harvey Karp, M.D. shares his groundbreaking approach to calming your new baby's crying and transforming your infant into the happiest baby on the block! His highly successful method is based on four revolutionary concepts: 1. Create the Fourth Trimester: How to re-create the womblike atmosphere your newborn baby still yearns for. 2. Find the Calming Reflex: An "off switch" all babies are born wtih, which quickly soothes fussing and crying. 3. Use the 5 S's: Five easy methods to turn on your baby's amazing calming reflex. 4. Apply the Cuddle Cure: How to combine the 5 S's to calm even colicky babies. THOROUGHLY REVISED SECOND EDITION"--

Best Books