The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) contains the uniform policies and procedures for acquisitions by executive agencies of the federal government. The FAR is issued and maintained by the Department of Defense, the General Services Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The January 2016 CCH Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) reproduces the FAR and all amendments to the regulations issued prior to January 1, 2016, along with an easy-to-use topical index. Sources of the amended text are listed in brackets along with the date of issuance and the effective date for all sections changed since the initial text of FAR appeared in the Federal Register of September 19, 1983. The January 2016 edition of Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) has been updated to include the latest Federal Acquisition Circulars, final rules, interim rules, and corrections made since July 1, 2015. In addition, it has been updated to include current coverage of: Use of Simplified Acquisition Procedures for Commercial Items Prohibition on Contracting with Inverted Domestic Corporations Justification for Urgent Noncompetitive Awards Exceeding One Year Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool Inflation Adjustment of Aquisition-Related Thresholds And much more!
The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) contains the uniform policies and procedures for acquisitions by executive agencies of the federal government. the FAR is issued and maintained by the Department of Defense, the General Services Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This CCH volume reproduces the FAR and all amendments to the regulations issued through January 1, 2009, along with an easy-to-use topical index. Sources of the amended text are listed in brackets along with the date of issuance and the effective date for all sections changed since the initial text of FAR appeared in the Federal Register of September 19, 1983. This new January 1, 2009 Edition also includes the Amendment to FAC 2005-29 issued 1/14/09 as well as FAC 2005 -30 issued 1/15/09. Also addressed are the important changes to FAC 2005-28 covering requirements for a contractor code of ethics and conduct, an internal control system and mandatory disclosure of criminal activity, False Claims Act violations and significant overpayments. Highlights of the January 1, 2009 Edition include: 7 Federal Acquisition Circulars (including FAC 2005 -30 issued 1/15/09) 1 Amendment (FAC 2005 -29 issued 1/14/09) 31 Final Rules 7 Interim Rules 2 Corrections With up-to-date coverage on these topics: New Contractor Business Ethics Compliance Program and Disclosure Requirements Exemptions from Service Contract Act Public Disclosure Requirements for Noncompetitive Contracts Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool Employment Eligibility Verification Enhanced Access for Small Business Federal Procurement Data System Reporting Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System and Subcontractor Requests for Bonds Extension of Authority for Use of Simplified Acquisition Procedures Enhanced Competition for Task and Delivery Order Contracts Revisions to the Defense Priorities and Allocations System Use of Products Containing Recovered Materials in Service and Construction Contracts Representations and Certifications - Tax Delinquencies Contract Debts Trade Agreements - New Thresholds Online Representations and Certifications Application Review Common Security Configurations ...plus much more!
The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) contains the uniform policies and procedures for acquisitions by executive agencies of the federal government. The FAR is issued and maintained by the Department of Defense, the General Services Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The January 2017 CCH Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) reproduces the FAR and all amendments to the regulations issued prior to January 1, 2017, along with an easy-to-use topical index. Sources of the amended text are listed in brackets along with the date of issuance and the effective date for all sections changed since the initial text of FAR appeared in the Federal Register of September 19, 1983. The January 2017 edition of Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) has been updated to include the latest Federal Acquisition Circulars, final rules, interim rules, and corrections made since July 1, 2016. In addition, it has been updated to include current coverage of: Paid Sick Leave for Federal Contractors Public Disclosure of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Reduction Goals Small Business Subcontracting Improvements Sole Source Contracts for Women-Owned Small Businesses Prohibition on Contracting with Corporations with Delinquent Taxes or a Felony Conviction Federal Prison Industries Blanket Waver Threshold Fair Play and Safe Workplaces Payment of Subcontractors And much more!
The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) contains the uniform policies and procedures for acquisitions by executive agencies of the federal government. This volume reproduces the FAR and all amendments to the regulations issued prior to July 1, 2017, along with an easy-to-use topical index.
CFR 48 continues coverage on Federal Acquisition Regulations System. This volume includes information on clauses and forms, and more.
The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) contains the uniform policies and procedures for acquisitions by executive agencies of the federal government. The FAR is issued and maintained by the Department of Defense, the General Services Administration, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The January 2018 CCH Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) reproduces the FAR and all amendments to the regulations issued prior to January 1, 2018, along with an easy-to-use topical index. Sources of the amended text are listed in brackets along with the date of issuance and the effective date for all sections changed since the initial text of FAR appeared in the Federal Register of September 19, 1983. It contains all of the Federal Acquisition Circular, Final Rule, Interim Rule and Corrections made since July 1, 2017.
Save time and eliminate errors with this quick-reference, A-Z guide to the language of procurement! Successful government contracting requires the use of precise, up-to-date terminology, as well as a firm understanding of current regulatory and case law. This quick-reference guide saves time and makes your job easier by providing ready definitions for more than 1500 terms, phrases and acronyms used in government procurement. Completely up-to-date terminology reflects statutory and regulatory changes, including some 600 terms relating directly to the rules and procedures mandated by various statutes and regulations, including: the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act, the Clinger-Cohen Act, the Federal Acquisition Regulation and agency FAR supplements. Written by preeminent experts on government contracts, Ralph C. Nash, Jr., Karen O'Brien-DeBakey, and Steven L. Schooner, The Government Contracts Reference Book provides clear explanations for general terms related to government procurement, as well as agency-specific terms from the Department of Defense, General Services Administration, Department of Energy, other agencies. Each explanation includes a summary of where the term is used in the statutes or regulations, including citations to the source documents. Organized in an easy-to-use alphabetical format and fully cross-referenced, this essential reference will help you manage all aspects of the procurement process with greater efficiency and confidence. The ideal starting point for further research! When you need to explore a term or topic further, The Government Contracts Reference Book serves as an invaluable research tool. You'll find: Current citations to FAR, DFARS, DEAR, NFS and other regulations, as well as to pertinent statutes, federal court decisions, administrative board decisions, and other important material Frequent references to sources of additional information, including some 50 texts, scores of articles from more than 30 different periodicals and many other types of documents issued by both government and private industry Web and Internet addresses for dozens of government and industry resources are also included Cross-references provided in ALL CAPS for ease of use
As governments are major buyers of goods and services, foreign companies are keen to be able to participate in procurement opportunities on an equal footing with national firms. This has given rise to the inclusion of procurement disciplines in trade agreements and to internationally-agreed good regulatory practices in this important policy area. The contributions to this book examine how the dynamic mix of bilateral, regional, plurilateral and international norms on government procurement is reflected in purchasing practices at the national level and whether these are leading to convergence in policies and approaches. The countries studied span both advanced, high-income economies and emerging economies. Some are members of the WTO procurement agreement, others are not. Most WTO members have decided not to commit to binding international disciplines on procurement in trade agreements. This book explores whether there has been nonetheless internationalization of good procurement practices, and what current public purchasing processes suggest as regards the value added of signing on to binding rules of the game in this area. The approach taken in the volume is interdisciplinary. Contributors include economists, political scientists, legal scholars, and practitioners with a solid understanding of both the extant international disciplines and national government procurement policies. Each chapter assesses the current state of play as regards legislation and procurement practices; the degree to which industrial policy considerations feature in the relevant regulatory frameworks; the existence and use of domestic dispute resolution and review procedures that allow firms to contest the behavior of procuring entities; and the availability of data on procurement processes and outcomes.
The world-renowned economist offers "dourly irreverent analyses of financial debacle from the tulip craze of the seventeenth century to the recent plague of junk bonds."—The Atlantic.
The federal government wastes your tax dollars worse than a drunken sailor on shore leave. The 1984 Grace Commission uncovered that the Department of Defense spent $640 for a toilet seat and $436 for a hammer. Twenty years later things weren't much better. In 2004, Congress spent a record-breaking $22.9 billion dollars of your money on 10,656 of their pork-barrel projects. The war on terror has a lot to do with the record $413 billion in deficit spending, but it's also the result of pork over the last 18 years the likes of: - $50 million for an indoor rain forest in Iowa - $102 million to study screwworms which were long ago eradicated from American soil - $273,000 to combat goth culture in Missouri - $2.2 million to renovate the North Pole (Lucky for Santa!) - $50,000 for a tattoo removal program in California - $1 million for ornamental fish research Funny in some instances and jaw-droppingly stupid and wasteful in others, The Pig Book proves one thing about Capitol Hill: pork is king!
The 2008 Edition of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct is an up-to-date resource for information on lawyer ethics. The Rules, with some variations, have been adopted in 48 jurisdictions. Federal, state, and local courts in all jurisdictions, even those that have not formally adopted the Rules, look to the Rules for guidance in resolving lawyer malpractice cases, disciplinary actions, disqualification issues, sanctions questions, and much more.
Summarizes the Federal Acquisition Regulation System (FARS), improper business practices and personal conflicts of interest, publicizing contract actions, outsourcing/privatization, and competition requirements. Addresses acquisition plans, contractor qualifications, contract delivery, and performance. Explains socio-economic policies, commercial items, options, sealed bidding, and negotiation. Reviews general contracting requirements, intellectual property, cost accounting standards, cost principles, financing, protests, disputes, and appeals. Explores research and development contracting, construction and architect-engineer contracts, inspection and warranty, value engineering, delays, suspension of work, modifications, subcontracting, and government contract termination.
We often define ourselves by our work, with a frequent introductory question being, 'What do you do?' Because we devote so much of our lives to our jobs, anything affecting them is of special concern to us. The federal government has assumed a role of protecting the rights of labourers, with the prime example being the Fair Labor Standards Act, which is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wage, overtime pay, and child labour. Since its adoption in 1938, the act has undergone several amendments and periodic changes. A constant issue is the level of the minimum wage, with many public officials and labour groups calling for its raise. Some though, have made proposals to weaken federal wage protection and exempt certain businesses from the law. Heated debate continues on both sides of this topic, which so closely impacts a significant portion of the population. Federal oversight of labour and work conditions is a fact of life, and the standards by which authorities fulfil this task need to be understood. This book studies the history behind and application of the Fair Labor Standards Act in its three distinct areas of minimum wage, overtime pay, and child labour. information this book holds becomes necessary to developing a clear vision of how the government influences the 'workaday world'.
This unbiased analysis of statutes, regulations, and case law clarifies the complex rules of federal procurement policies, explaining the processes that government personnel and contractors must follow in every aspect of government contracting--from inception to completion. Topics include contract administration and personnel, contract interpretation, risk allocation, changes, delays, pricing of adjustments, and much more.

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